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JohnyCage

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  1. [quote name='Evil Steve' timestamp='1326981616' post='4904266'] You need to set the destination blend type too. Something like: [code] device.SetRenderState(RenderState.DestBlend, SlimDX.Direct3D9.Blend.InvSourceAlpha); [/code] I'm not sure what the SlimDX state names are, but you want to set the destination blend to inverse source alpha. [/quote] y, its right answer, thanks.
  2. attached better picture.
  3. hi dudes., how can i start to use 256 degrees of transparency on my textured objects? I use following lines of code: [CODE] texture512 = Texture.FromFile(d, "1.png", 512, 512, 1, Usage.None, Format.A8R8G8B8, Pool.Managed, Filter.Triangle, Filter.Triangle, Color.FromArgb(255, 255, 0, 0).ToArgb()); . . device.SetRenderState(RenderState.AlphaBlendEnable, true); device.SetRenderState(RenderState.SourceBlend, SlimDX.Direct3D9.Blend.SourceAlpha); device.SetRenderState(RenderState.AlphaTestEnable, true); device.SetRenderState(RenderState.AlphaRef, 0x01); device.SetRenderState(RenderState.AlphaFunc, SlimDX.Direct3D9.Compare.Always); [/CODE] Attached picture can describe better my problem. Black places are not mixed by yellow background.
  4. Hi, how can i monitor messages from DX? Does exist any equivalent of Spy++?
  5. y its searched problem, thanks.
  6. ok, thanks...and.. does exist any way, how can we make a game for 2 multiplayer internet players if each ones use router with NAT?
  7. Hi all, nowdays i installed SlimDX but i cant see DirectPlay namespace. How can i use DirectPlay under SlimDX(DX9)? Thanks for yours reply.
  8. Its working now. It takes a few minutes such as you said.
  9. i am using VS08. SlimDX reffs are still unvisible.
  10. Hi all, I installed latest SlimDx and DX SDK. I am trying to add SlimDX reference to my project but under Project/Add reference/Net or Com tab is not SlimDX item to choose. Whats happen?Thanks for reply.
  11. Quote:Original post by Ravuya Quote:Original post by JohnyCage Quote:Original post by Ravuya I'm pretty sure 'memory' in this context refers to 'disk space' since, as Promit said, the driver will just wedge the 32-bit version in primary memory. Since 8 is a quarter of 32, there's your 75% savings. What kind of memory limits are you under that you need an 8-bit indexed colour texture? As for your size question, if you have a 256 x 256 texture with eight bits per pixel... well, you have 256 * 256 * 8 = 524288 bits = 65536 bytes = 64 kilobytes. On top of that there's probably some header information or something. Summary.: *pic: 256*256px -> PNG, JPG, BMP (8,16 or 32bit) -> 256Kb RAM in DirectX used. *pic: 256*256px -> DXT, 8bit -> 64Kb RAM in DirectX used IS IT TRUE OR FALSE ? thanx for patience :-) Kilobytes (KB) are different from Kilobits (Kb). But based on what Promit said, the first condition (256KB) is the correct one. hmm...than the second condition is incorrect ?we can read : a quotation from.: http://vvvv.org/tiki-print.php?page=HowTo%20Prepare%20Textures "If you want to load a very large number of textures its recommended to choose a compressed texture memory format to save RAM space." How much ram is it...If the second condition is the incorrect ??
  12. Quote:Original post by Ravuya I'm pretty sure 'memory' in this context refers to 'disk space' since, as Promit said, the driver will just wedge the 32-bit version in primary memory. Since 8 is a quarter of 32, there's your 75% savings. What kind of memory limits are you under that you need an 8-bit indexed colour texture? As for your size question, if you have a 256 x 256 texture with eight bits per pixel... well, you have 256 * 256 * 8 = 524288 bits = 65536 bytes = 64 kilobytes. On top of that there's probably some header information or something. Summary.: *pic: 256*256px -> PNG, JPG, BMP (8,16 or 32bit) -> 256Kb RAM in DirectX used. *pic: 256*256px -> DXT, 8bit -> 64Kb RAM in DirectX used IS IT TRUE OR FALSE ? thanx for patience :-)
  13. Quote:Original post by Promit Don't bother. The graphics driver will simply expand it to 32 bit ARGB anyway. okok..but they wrote: while still offering a 75% savings in disk and SYSTEM MEMORY.
  14. PLEASE PEOPLE…HELP ME… I read this article about the DXT : http://udn.epicgames.com/Two/UnrealTexturing EXTRACT.: * Eight-bit Palettized P8 textures, as they are denoted in the editor, are the same 8-bit palettized (256 color) textures used in the build 436 engine and earlier ("Unreal" and "Unreal Tournament" timeframe). Even though they are uploaded to the video card as a full 32-bit RGBA texture, when properly quantized a P8 can look identical to the original 24-bit source art, while still offering a 75% savings in disk and system memory. P8 textures offer 1-bit alpha in the form of a mask color. If a texture is imported as masked, color index 0 is set as transparent. Once you palettize your texture, you'll need to edit your 256-color image and apply color zero to the transparent portions of the texture. * MY QUESTION, EXAMPLE: I have a picture (256*256px).. How much ram will be used…if i will use „Eight-bit Palettized „ Thanx very much.
  15. PLEASE PEOPLE…HELP ME… I read this article about the DXT : http://udn.epicgames.com/Two/UnrealTexturing EXTRACT.: * Eight-bit Palettized P8 textures, as they are denoted in the editor, are the same 8-bit palettized (256 color) textures used in the build 436 engine and earlier ("Unreal" and "Unreal Tournament" timeframe). Even though they are uploaded to the video card as a full 32-bit RGBA texture, when properly quantized a P8 can look identical to the original 24-bit source art, while still offering a 75% savings in disk and system memory. P8 textures offer 1-bit alpha in the form of a mask color. If a texture is imported as masked, color index 0 is set as transparent. Once you palettize your texture, you'll need to edit your 256-color image and apply color zero to the transparent portions of the texture. * MY QUESTION, EXAMPLE: I have a picture (256*256px).. How much ram will be used…if i will use „Eight-bit Palettized (maybe in dxt) „ Thanx very much.