Kryzon

Members
  • Content count

    926
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

4633 Excellent

About Kryzon

  • Rank
    Advanced Member

Personal Information

  • Interests
    Art
  1. Best way to create terrain/assets for 3D JRPG?

    I would categorise that Tales of Vesperia style as "low poly hand-painted". Everything you do with a graphics tablet is technically "hand-painted", but when people use this term they usually mean a model that is textured with only a diffuse \ albedo texture that was painted using mostly noiseless brushes, such as a hard round brush, and little to no post-processing or filtering. It has a specific stylised clean look. It's a very popular style and you can find plenty of stuff (on how to create your own assets) on Pinterest (you need a free account to see everything), Youtube etc.
  2. Day-night cycle colors

    If you're technically inclined, there's this website full of info on computer graphics -- including the sky-scaterring phenomenon that's related to the colours of a day-night cycle: http://www.scratchapixel.com/lessons/procedural-generation-virtual-worlds/simulating-sky
  3. Which color picker do you prefer?

    I prefer this one, the saturation-value square inscribed in a circular hue border: Couple of benefits that I think it has: - Slightly bigger picking area than the triangle variant. - The square shape is aligned with the saturation and value axes, so it's more intuitive to use than the triangle with its tilted vertex axes.
  4. Need Help Choosing Art Style

    If you're in doubt of what style to go with, here's a suggestion: flip a coin. If it's heads you go with the comic style and if it's tails you go with the hand-painted style. If you flip the coin and go "oh, no..." (disappointed at the result), then you finally found out which style you really prefer. Going a different way, though, you could pick the style that's enjoyable and easy to work with so you can move on and make your game -- since you worked with both styles, you're the best person to gauge which one has these qualities. One thing that I would do differently is to make a full mock-up of a game screen, including characters, ui elements etc. Maybe one of these styles will clash with something in an unexpected way, so you should give yourself more visual information to make a good decision.
  5. How to stay motivated?

    Did you make any progress, or had any breakthroughs? I'm very curious.
  6. How to stay motivated?

    I echo what @ApochPiQ said. While you look for someone that's qualified to give you life advice, here are some more things for you to consider: This is a quote from a local newspaper article on motivation. A specialist says: Use your eating habits to improve your quality of life. Avoid takeout and processed foods and rely on homecooking more. Since homecooking takes time, there's this tip from Jamie Oliver which is to cook in big batches (during the weekend, for example) so you can freeze portions for the week. Besides the obvious nutrition benefits, it will save you time during the week since you won't have too cook (just heat in the microwave or stove for example), and depending on your situation homecooking can also be more economical, saving you a few bucks. The following post by @Dannthr is for the music industry, but I consider it inspirational for creative fields in general. Print it (on actual paper) and read it from time to time: 557522-i-want-to-be-a-game-composer Forgot to add something, and it's very similar to what @fireside7 said. Any progress is progress. It's cumulative. Big valuable projects are made with incremental steps, that's how you'll get yours done. Good luck.
  7. Annoying e-mails

    Hi @jbadams, this is the entire e-mail: At the bottom there's only that "privacy policy" link. There's no unsubscription link like in the example you posted. The HTML code of the e-mail is this: Thank you for fixing it. In case it helps some more, there were four e-mails total arriving at (19 Aug 2017 22:22:10 (UTC), 20 Aug 2017 00:35:06 (UTC), 20 Aug 2017 05:05:15 (UTC) and 20 Aug 2017 07:17:26 (UTC) ) But in terms of unsubscribing, the process could be improved, in my opinion. This is how I rate the UX of different unsubscription procedures, from best to worst: E-mail has a "unsubscribe here" link at the bottom, and simply visiting the address will automatically unsubscribe you, without the need to login. E-mail has a "unsubscribe here" link, and visiting it prompts you to login before the operation can finish (this is what Facebook does) . E-mail has a link at the bottom that leads you to your notification settings in your profile. You need to login, look for and find the setting and then disable it. E-mail does not have any unsubscription link (the GD.net reminder e-mails being talked about in this thread). Thanks again.
  8. Color interpolation between orange and blue

    If you interpolate the RGB values of two complementary colours you will go through a neutral region of the RGB space. The middle of your gradient will be "grey". There are other ways of interpolating colours, like interpolating the parameters of your two colours while in the L*a*b* or HSL space. Use this tool for some previews: http://davidjohnstone.net/pages/lch-lab-colour-gradient-picker
  9. Holy... I've received 4 of these in the last 2 days. Put a cork in it. At the very least add a "unsubscribe from e-mails like these" option, like the ones you can find at the end of e-mails from decent newsletters (especially the ones that you've opted-in, unlike this one). Now the only reason I've visited the forums is to complain about this. --- I've had a bad day.
  10. Sketchbook Pro or GIMP for Tilesets?

    Sketchbook Pro looks more like the type of tool to make illustrations, not precise pixel art. If you're going for sophisticated high-resolution tiles (like this), then sure, you can use it. But you mentioned RPGMaker, so if you have to do small tiles (like something less than 64x64 px) then it's better to work with a tool that let's you more easily control individual pixels such as GIMP, Photoshop, Krita, Paint.NET etc. Krita in particular has a "tile mode" feature that displays your canvas tiled to infinity. It's very useful for making seamless graphics, like tiles.
  11. Web/Mac based Heightmap generators?

    You can use the Compositor module of Blender to generate an image based on any sort of combination of procedural textures you may think of. It's available for Mac and you wouldn't have to mess with 3D, just textures and the compositor.
  12. Creating a game like Episode Interactive?

    The name of that style of animation is literally "cut-out", and is one of the two major styles used in 2D animation. The other style is called "frame-by-frame". Some animation use both techniques at the same time for a hybrid look (modern My Little Pony is an example, it's made with Adobe Flash which is now called Adobe Animate CC). Besides what's already been mentioned, any of these tools have built-in cutout animation functionality. Check their documentation: - OpenToonz - Synfig - Toon Boom Harmony - Moho Also, someone made animated portraits for their game using Live2D, a Japanese program that relies on warping effects to give the illusion of depth. This type of style is usually called "2.5D", like it's 2D but with something extra. - Live2D Cubism - Animated portraits
  13. A meditation trick to clear your mind

    For that and for other reasons I think every highschool should have practical meditation classes. I believe I would have benefited from knowing stuff like this when I was at school.
  14. [media]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HCeJHtRtztU[/media] Someone showed this to me and I ended up using this every day when sitting in front of the computer. Your decisions become much more objective. So I felt compelled to spread the science. Once you stop all the thinking you can breath slowly trying to lower your heart rate and remain in this neutral state. There's nothing esoteric about it, you're letting the anxiety fade away.
  15. pixel art: the egyptian soldier in the egyptian temple

    I like the idea of visual storytelling that you have there. You see the image and you need to scroll down to see what the image is about, so there's a bit of suspense. You could add some blood splats and scratches on the walls as you scroll down, as an indication of the fight that you're about to see. But exactly for this reason I think the scene at the bottom should be much more impactful. Use more dramatic lighting, viewpoint, poses etc. Right now it's a bit tame. Take a look at some theatre photographs, that's exactly what they try to do: impactful visuals.