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let_bound

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  1. I don't know much about Apache et PHP, and even less about Windows, but could it be a permission problem? The Apache process needs to be able to load the libraries. You're also mixing forward- and backslashes, so I'd make sure that backslashes are authorized at all in the Apache configuration files. How are you creating the PDO object?
  2. Quote:Original post by Joshuad I'm currently dual booting between windows XP and Fedora 10. I'm just curious if developing software designed for windows would be flawed by developing them on a linux environment. Not as long as you know what you're doing. If you've got a working cross-compiler, a working development environment (Windows headers and libraries), etc, then I can't think of any major hurdle. Testing your software, OTOH, could prove more difficult.
  3. I don't use visual studio, but I'd be very surprised if it didn't allow you to get a backtrace of the call stack, at the very least.
  4. Have you restarted Apache after making the modifications?
  5. Quote:Original post by Hodgman Quote:Original post by KreK Another problem is that a lot of cryptographic algorithms are protected by patentsAlso, the US classifies certain crypto algorithms as weapons, and thus exporting a working implementation is illegal. I was under the impression this was over, at least as far as algorithms are concerned, unless one is attempting to export said algorithms to so-called rogue states. Is that incorrect?
  6. If you don't mind a very large library, then ICU is an option, though it does much more than just provide support for UTF-8.
  7. Quote:Original post by Bru i thought of an idea of having those files also in the server side, and when the client tries to connect, force the client to randomly check some bytes(their data and location in the file) in some files, and send it to the server to check if these bytes have the same data and are in the same location in the file. it's a little costy if you have alot of files. if might not work if the files are slightly modified, but only way to pass it i can think of is reverse engineering the client. what do you think about it? Reverse engineering a client is easy-ish, since you control its environment anyway. If you mean the client to refuse running if the server's answer is negative, then it's very easy to circumvent: just disassemble the executable and change the jump instruction. If you mean the server to refuse the connection if the client notifies it that the files have changed, I can see two easy way to work around that. Either hack the client to always tell the server that the files haven't changed, or just hack the client (again) to make the check against the original files, while using the modified files during the actual playing of the game. That would work with checksums as well (just record the checksums of the original files and send that instead of the current checksums). It's also possible to simply reverse-engineer the protocol and to write a small application proxy that'll sit between the application and the server, thus avoiding the need to disassemble the client altogether. DLL injection can also be used to override some functions. Really, there's no way to protect that data.
  8. I think the idiomatic Qt way would be to create a Direct3D widget that inherits QWidget. If you use the QMainWindow's HWND, you'll probably draw over/under its children. I don't know D3D, so I can't help you, but if I was in your shoes, I'd check out the QGLWidget source and adapt it to D3D.
  9. Nevermind. I read your post again, and I don't understand your problem. You've obviously found the palette member of the SDL_PixelFormat type.
  10. Try :load Random or :also Random? It's been a while since I've done anything with Haskell, especially with Hugs.
  11. I'm too lazy to read all your code, but a simple way to compare classes in Python is to implement __cmp__: class MyClass: def __init__(self, someValue): self.someValue = someValue def __cmp__(self, other): return cmp(self.someValue, other.someValue) def main(): a = MyClass(1) b = MyClass(2) print a < b if __name__ == '__main__': main()
  12. Quote:Original post by elih1 "Can you connect to your database via ODBC with another program?" How can I do that? I'm new to the whole thing. Also I try to connect to the database with C#( not with ODBC) ,and it worked. Can you give me some link that says how can I connect to the databse using odbc? I don't think you need anything special: if you can test the connection from within the ODBC datasource configuration window on the same host you run the Qt application on, then the database is listening to external connections. A quick Google search brought me to this page where a tool could be of interest: OdbcTest. There are 2 versions linked, one for what I'll assume is wide-character support, and another one for what I'll assume is UTF-16 (flagged as "Unicode"). Maybe using one of these tools will allow to find out if your database server is using Unicode or not. Quote:I forget to mention that I connect qt4.4.3 with sql server 2008 in one machine, and the problem is that I can't connect qt.4.4.0 with sql server 2000 which I really need to do. In that case the servers configurations are probably widely different. The 2008 version is very likely to be using Unicode by default, whereas the 2000 version might be using some wide-character encoding. Of course, encoding might not be the problem at all... Have you tried using ODBC 3.x instead of the default ODBC 2.x? #include <QCoreApplication> #include <QSqlDatabase> #include <QSqlError> #include <QDebug> int main(int argc, char* argv[]) { QCoreApplication app(argc, argv); QSqlDatabase db = QSqlDatabase::addDatabase("QODBC"); db.setConnectOptions("SQL_ATTR_ODBC_VERSION=SQL_OV_ODBC3"); // Also, try replacing the two previous lines with: // QSqlDatabase db = QSqlDatabase::addDatabase("QODBC3"); // No need to set any version option in that case db.setHostName("Com3"); db.setDatabaseName("PRIMER"); bool r = db.open(); if (!r) { qDebug() << db.lastError().text(); } else { qDebug() << "OK!"; } } Here, I get the following error message: " [iODBC][Driver Manager]Data source name not found and no default driver specified. Driver could not be loaded QODBC3: Unable to connect" Obviously, it's because I haven't configured a DSN, but it's interesting to note the error message saying that the driver couldn't be loaded, even though it was. What is the exact error message you're getting?
  13. I've got more questions for you. ;-) Can you connect to your database via ODBC with another program? Have you made sure your code, the ODBC driver and the SQL server are all using the same encoding (eg "Unicode", as Microsoft likes to call UTF-16)? You said it worked fine with Qt 4.4.3. Are both versions on the same machine? If so, could it be that Qt 4.4.0 is attempting to load the Qt 4.4.3 plugin, because that's where %QTDIR% points it to? I don't know if it should matter, but it's worth a thought, especially if they use different character encodings (see above). in db.setDatabaseName("PRIMER");, is "PRIMER" the name of the ODBC data source (DSN), or the name of the database? I know the error happens before the call to setDatabaseName(), but I might as well ask. If none of the above solves your issue, the only thing I can suggest is to rebuild Qt with -qt-sql-odbc instead of -plugin-sql-odbc and see if that changes anything.
  14. Just out of curiosity, could you compile and run the following code: #include <QApplication> #include <QSqlDatabase> #include <QStringList> #include <QDebug> int main(int argc, char* argv[]) { QApplication app(argc, argv); qDebug() << "Available drivers:"; QStringList drivers = QSqlDatabase::drivers(); foreach(QString driver, drivers) qDebug() << "\t" << driver; QSqlDatabase db = QSqlDatabase::addDatabase("QODBC"); qDebug() << "ODBC driver valid?" << db.isValid(); } I used the following project file: TEMPLATE = app TARGET = testdb DEPENDPATH += . INCLUDEPATH += . QT += sql SOURCES += TestDB.cc On my system, the output was: urizen:~/testdb$ ./testdb Available drivers: "QSQLITE" "QMYSQL3" "QMYSQL" "QODBC3" "QODBC" "QPSQL7" "QPSQL" ODBC driver valid? true Out of curiosity, are you using XP64? EDIT: fixed source code display, and typo.
  15. I probably won't be of much help, as I don't use Windows if I can avoid it, but: is the build working at all? I thought the GPL version of Qt 4 would only work with GNU make? Is there a qsqlodbc.dll file under the %QTDIR%\plugins\sqldrivers directory once the build is finished? I'm not too clear on your configure step. Isn't that supposed to be done before building Qt, so it'll also build the required plugins? How are you attempting to load the ODBC module within your code? Show us at least the project file (.pro) and the source code causing the issue.