• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

rubicondev

Members
  • Content count

    592
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

296 Neutral

About rubicondev

  • Rank
    Advanced Member
  1. My personal take: Someone who wants a "coder" thinks that he has the harder job, being the designer.
  2. Someone else said it was about the players so I was just playing along. I get your point though and agree that once your environment is well populated then upper limits are indeed just fluff. Someone above said they could do it all with procedural content and player generated stuff. Which is fine, I'm not knocking it. But how would you attach the superlative "massive" to something like that? You just can't. It's just an online game and in my world there's nothing wrong with online games.
  3. Wow, that's quite a bit deeper than I was intending to go but I do see the value in it. Seeing as you were good enough to share the important bits I might stick this in as well and have a play around, thanks. The tiling stuff will definitely be handy.
  4. Jesus why does everyone on this board have to be so pedantic the whole time. I take a deep breath every time I post in case something I say might be as much as 1% out. A million is massive to me. Maybe only a few games make that, it was just an out of ass number. Perhaps "massive" should officially mean only a quarter million. Let's ask the OED. Maybe WOW really only has ten players online at once. If you're doing a boutique MO game and want to call it an MMO, go right ahead. Especially if you only need one server, which is pretty much the definition of "not massive" to the rest of us. No content either? Great, where can I sign. Now cite the one exception that proves I'm talking out of my ass... Minecraft probably.I don't know why I get into these, it was a religion one last week. You know, the God version, not the "my definition is better than yours" one. Rant over now. What stupid_programmer said +1
  5. [quote name='Butabee' timestamp='1296947589' post='4770176'] [quote name='Rubicon' timestamp='1296903346' post='4769949'] I think anyone still in the camp of "it can be done" are missing something simple. It's been alluded to already but I'll restate it again. Writing a game that's server based multiplayer, even if it's persistent, just adds the MO part. To get that other M, the game needs to be, er, massive. That's it. How is one guy or even a small team going to make something that anyone would look at and say "wow, that's not just big, it's massive!". Answer: None, regardless of competence levels. The fact that newbies think they can do it is laughable and only good for a fun poke. When good developers talk about doing one, they're just redefining the "M" bit to mean "minimal". Bottom line: To make an online game that is truly massive, even if the code and assets just dropped into your lap one day, you'd still need to spend more money than you've ever earned to date in your life on servers, server staffing and customer support [/quote] I think there are some different definitions of MMO going on here. The M stands for a massive amount of players playing together, not necessarily a massive game, content or mechanic wise. [/quote]Yes and no. It's probably a case that an indie team defines massive as a thousand?. A thousand isn't massive though, it's merely "a bit big". To me, "massive" means a million players and that's not going to fit on your pc in the corner. Especially when to get a million players you do in fact need massive content else they won't come. But I don't want to get into a fight about it. People bend titles/headings/definitions to fit there own goals all the time and I'm quite possibly being contrarian for the hell of it...
  6. I'm just getting around to making a proper fist of a perlin noise class. I aim to do 1D, 2D and 3D versions and I already have code to do the necessary interpolations. For all 3x classes, I aim to provide a larger function to return a finished value with given number of octaves etc and also a smaller function that gives just the bare result so you get to dick around with the values as you "zoom in". One thing I've always struggled with though is what the inital sample coordinates actually mean. For example in the 2D case would it be better to map the inputs such that a range of 0-1 spans the number of samples in each dimension? A value of 2.5 would then get wrapped to 0.5 before looking up halfway through the samples. Leaving things to just wrap by casting to int and masking off with the number of samples just seems a bit arbitrary to me. What would the panel consider the ideal behaviour for a class like this? All comments welcome.
  7. I think anyone still in the camp of "it can be done" are missing something simple. It's been alluded to already but I'll restate it again. Writing a game that's server based multiplayer, even if it's persistent, just adds the MO part. To get that other M, the game needs to be, er, massive. That's it. How is one guy or even a small team going to make something that anyone would look at and say "wow, that's not just big, it's massive!". Answer: None, regardless of competence levels. The fact that newbies think they can do it is laughable and only good for a fun poke. When good developers talk about doing one, they're just redefining the "M" bit to mean "minimal". Bottom line: To make an online game that is truly massive, even if the code and assets just dropped into your lap one day, you'd still need to spend more money than you've ever earned to date in your life on servers, server staffing and customer support
  8. Can I just chip in here with another really useful snippet? I do indeed think that anyone who thinks the Earth is 6,000 years old is an idiot. Worse than an idiot in fact. Unless he is severely retarded, even an idiot can still learn stuff if you take the time to teach him. Whereas a zealot won't budge a millimetre on anything.
  9. I'd propose you just think they're cool names because they're successful companies making stuff you probably like, or at least respect. Few people have heard of my little piss pot firm and if I renamed it to "valve" and announced it here*, people would think the name sucks ass. Because it does. [size="1"] * Assuming the other one didn't exist[/size]
  10. Edit: Superpig's point 3) explains perfectly why I broke my silence on this topic for once. Anything said by someone who believes in something that doesn't come with even a shadow of evidence is therefore to be taken with a pinch of salt. Even when on non-religious subjects, because you don't know if there opinion on say the environment has any basis in fact whatsoever or is just a matter of "faith". Well, almost an edit!
  11. "I follow religion because it makes me feel good" is a perfectly reasonable standpoint. If religionists stopped there I'd be a happy man too. It's all the pseudo-science that often follows behind it that I take exception to.
  12. I'd love to Mikeman, but there's utterly no point. All zealots ever do is look for cracks in arguments and shout "case not proven", and then utterly fail to see the irony of that. Like the crap above about intelligent design and the big bang being not quite explained yet, so therefore God did it. For fucks sake. Despite my somewhat unsublte stance, I'm really not just trying to troll for the sake of it. I want someone, without using the word "belief" or "faith" to prove to me there's a God. And like I said at the start, prove to me that God exists and I'll kneel alongside you. Or even forget absolute proof - I'll settle for a fairly compelling bit of circumstantial evidence. Anything at all really. I mean, ok. Big Bang. Better people than I can't understand it. That means it's not understood yet. So that's where the speculation should end either way. If you want to claim that God did it, then fine - just don't piss on me and tell me it's raining. I was addressing the usual zealotry btw, not you personally. I know you didn't set out to prove or disprove anything and you freel admit that you believe in God because it seems right to do that. And who am I to say you can't. What annoys me is people claiming that because science doesn't yet have all the answers, religion provides them. It provides no answers at all. Where in the bible, the quran or whatever does it say when and how the big bang happened? Surely we're not going with the old testament version, so which?
  13. Oh man, I soooo love these threads. Especially when the religious start trying to bend science to fit. I do envy zealots their one trait. The absolute certainty that what they believe in really does exist despite much proof to the contrary. The rest of the world are losing out on that one for sure. But if I wanted to live the rest of my life in some fantasy land that doesn't match reality, I'd probably go with the hardcore drugs option tbh.
  14. To address the original question, it's not to be proven that God doesn't exist. Given how intangible it is be default, it's for believers to convince the rest of us that he [b]does[/b] exist. When I see some real evidence, I'll get down on my knees with the rest of you, I promise.
  15. Degree also. In math. You need a degree of some sort to get past the HR drones before you could in theory start arguing the case for why "you're the one" A CS degree is about only useful for background info. If you have what it takes to make it in the game dev world then you could doubtless learn the programming side by yourself. However a math degree is far more useful imo and I wish I'd done this myself. And that's what most of my colleagues with some sort of computer degree also seem to say on a regular basis.