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Dwiff

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  1. I've been to a regular college(s) and I'm currently in a game specific college (Full Sail). Having a strong regular computer science background makes learning the game development stuff much easier IMHO. Plus schools like this really skimp on the math, so you'll come out of a regular college much more well rounded. That said if you want to learn how to program and get your feet wet right away then a school like Full Sail might be more your style. Getting a degree in less than two years is a huge plus, but you're not going to get the depth you'd get at other schools.
  2. I sent you a PM.
  3. Just to clarify for the Post 9/11 GI Bill you did not have to pay the $1200 to receive it, those of us that did pay into it get that money back if we exhaust all the benefits. Not trying to harp you on school or anything, just making sure you understand you probably still are eligible for it.
  4. I'm sure you know about the GI Bill, but you mentioned several times you were in the Marines. You were medically discharged and I don't know all the rules about that but something to look into if school is an interest at all for you. They are paying for my tuition and my living expenses so its pretty much a full ride if you qualify. Food for thought.
  5. I really like this idea. In response to JasRonq my suggestion would be, just don't have heal spells. And there is no guideline that says magic users must have lower health points. It is just kind of an assumed thing in so many games, I guess because the stereotypical concept of someone that is into magic reads books all day and is fragile because of it? If in your world magic users are taxed in terms of health whenever you use magic then it makes sense to me that magic users would be as physically strong if not more so than the normal person. My idea immediately went to introducing fatigue, where as you cast spells its weakens you (maybe movement/attack speed, hp/regen, physically aging the character??, whatever fits for your game), and after a certain level of fatigue it starts draining your health. Kinda sounds like a mana bar is being replaced with a fatigue bar, but just an idea.
  6. Well using your basketball analogy. If you sit two feet from the basket and practice that shot over and over you get better at that shot. That doesn't correspond to a one-to-one experience gain at three point shots or even making that same shot under intense defense. Seems like you need to put the sword swing or whatever they are doing into some kind of context. Easier said than done, I know, but in many normal XP based RPGs XP is based on you level compared to the targets level. Same sort of thing can apply to a skill based RPG.
  7. Haven't played MUD's in ages, but I used to be hugely into them. I even convinced my High School computer science teacher to let me work on one for my senior year, but I digress. Completely different style but I always started with the lore of the world I was attempting to create. Building back-stories, history, layouts for social organizations, interactions between NPC's, that kind of stuff was always my favorite and also when I used to play a lot of D&D in the day. From there I would build on the character types coming from the perspective of "How do I want the characters to interact" rather than how are Fighters or Spellcasters going to behave. Class balance is one of the hardest things to achieve in RPGs but you don't always have to base character balance on combat effectiveness(even though that seems to be the most common thing to do these days). On my favorite MUD of all time my character was a thief. In a straight up One-on-One fight with a fighter or spell caster I was toast in no time, but what made the character so fun was the non-combat stuff. I remember being with friends while we would spy and creep around while looting stuff off of higher level players and the rush we felt when we knew we got caught and had to hide for hours because death actually carried a stiff penalty. Just throwing it out there.
  8. I think you just need to rework your block class a little. Really the way I think you are doing it there should never be a reason to destroy a block, only a reason to destroy tiles. A block is just a relationship that holds the positions for four tiles to control things like moving, rotating, and collision detection. Once the block collides and can no longer move all you need to do is move your pointer to a new instance of a block containing four new tiles and the four tiles that were in the old block stay put, unless a row is deleted. So deleting a block shoud delete the pointers that point to the tiles but not actually delete the tiles themselves.
  9. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linear_algebra I'd read the elementry introduction section Honestly though, I'm not a math guy and I just finished the class and couldn't tell you concisely what linear algebra is and how to use it. I just took from it the stuff I knew I would need from the math I've seen and used for programming and it cleared some things up but left me with a billion more questions.
  10. I have the book, but I have had those classes you're talking about. Understanding basic matrix math would be nice, and I know we learned it around pre-calc and hit it hard in linear but honestly its easy enough you can figure it out by reading an appendix from a math book that covers it. To be honest it completely depends on your goals for the book. If you just want to use the book as a reference to do all the math for you and you can get to things that interest you more, then it might be a good idea. If you actually want to learn 3D math you can probably read through the book a lot but will definately struggle depending on how well you pick it up. So in summary, for reference only, yes for learning, I'd wait
  11. It is hard to say who you should cater to more. I would guess that it would depend on who your players generally are. If you have a small group of players that play a lot then perhaps it would make sense to have those types of players have a stronger advantage. Then again if you have a larger group of new players that want to try PvP then by all means attempt to make it as far as possible. Me personally I want to participate in PvP early on. I don't like games where you have to have a near maxed character in order to consider PvP. WoW did okay with allowing different segments of the population to compete against each other in an area fashion but the player that was level x9 compared to x0 had a significant advantage and equipment made up the biggest make or break factor. Games like SWG (before being completely reformed) did not have arena style combat but PvP was just, if I see someone that I can attack I will, even if they are significantly lower. This caused almost anyone who wasn't maxed out level to hide and not allow PvP until they knew they wouldn't get slaughtered. Then you have games like Ultima Online when it was in its first generations (don't know if it still this way) that if you were playing in a PvP environment you would basically expect to be PvP'd numerous times daily until you have a good enough character. This was the most frustrating of them all. I'm just kind of rambling now, but this leads me to a key idea of PvP in general. There should be some kind of motivation needed to PvP someone. The problem with games is someone will just walk up and kill someone else because they think it is fun. If they can kill their own team you will have people that will just do that all day. I'm sure you've played FPS's with friendly fire on that someone just keeps logging onto a sever to just frag their own teammates over and over. How do you make it fun for people that want a meaningful PvP experience keeping in-line with the story of the game and not limit PvP to the extent where it is just a duel type of event?
  12. I'll try to decipher what you wrote Buckeye and try it out this weekend. Thanks.
  13. Thanks for the ideas. The decal thing won't work for my project because the general idea is I have these rooms that the user can walk around in and pick up various spray paint cans. So basically we want to be able to allow the user to paint the walls with various colors however they feel like it, and we don't want them to be able to undo anything. I know this probably isn't the most efficient matter but right now we have particle systems for the various nozzles of the spray cans that allow to user to specify "paint brushes" if you will. Some spread out more than others and what not. Right now we just made it so if the particle collides with the wall it "sticks" and gives us an OK effect but obviously if you spray for a long time we are talking about a ton of objects and that just doesn't work.
  14. I have a basic 3D room I can walk around in and I want the user to be able to click and draw on the wall, kind of like tagging. Right now I have fairly large walls that are texture mapped. I was thinking about painting the texture in very small quads and determining which quad the user had the mouse over and making that part of the texture a specific color. Unfortunately I don't know how to change the color of the original texture. Any suggestions?
  15. I kind of agree with Chrono and I might like the mini game idea depending on the implementation of it. If you do a mini game type of thing it has to make sense and not just be there to be there. The reason I like this is if a person isn't paying attention while smithing, or whatever, they could mess up on even basic smithing (which happens), and if you allow a greater and greater level of refinement where the game keeps getting harder with the amount of extra tinkering you're attempting I could see where people with skills at the game will exceed beyond what most people can do, and I like that idea.