hundel

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About hundel

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  1. Homunculus - My New Character

    Thanks all. I am using Blender 2.36. I think I am now a convert from 3DS Max.
  2. Here's my latest computer graphic work. His name is "Homunculus". Translation - "the little man". Homunculus has a rich tradition in history and again in modern psychology (where he represents the human body as it would look if it were proportioned to the area each body part has in the brain). Homunculus-03
  3. ITS GOBLIN TIME

    Consider increasing the polygon count to make some of these angles more subtle. It's unlikely any use case would require such a budgeted model. For example, the nose, chin, and brows all would benefit greatly from refinement. They are not truly pointed in the concept, they are an approximation of pointedness. If the artist had drawn a sharp angle anywhere but at the tips of the ears, you would have noticed (and probably not liked it). Mimic that in your work. I agree that ears need work. They do a lot for the character and attitude of the drawing, and give the opposite look in the mesh. The profile can be evaluated in terms of the goblin looking left in the sketch. I think it shows some difference of opinion in the neck width and angle. Would this work benefit from a little more weight in the toe-area of the foot? They are not visible in the sketch, but if they were drawn as the 3D mesh implies, they would look unstable - almost fragile. Finally, I think the angle of the brow and the drop-off from the brow to the eye sockets could be altered in your model. The brow is not capable of the expression in the sketch, even with appropriate texturing. You may wish to add polygons, refine and reangle some of these edges. Mustra, this is your best model. It is great to see you working towards your goals.
  4. Elven model

    Mustra - watching your posts, I think you're improving a good deal with each new attempt. One skill you can work on is making your mesh "manifold". In short, that means the mesh is one continuous surface. That's easy to accomplish by selecting and "welding" vertices. You wouldn't want a leaky manifold on a car and you wouldn't want a leaky manifold on a model. It will have obvious visual impact on everything from smoothing to animation to texture unwrapping. Next, I'd consider some of the fine tutorials available. They're remarkably quick and effective in the skill-building stage. You may be surprised at what can be accomplished when you "stand on the shoulders of giants", learning from their mistakes and experience. Here's a couple of examples from very skilled artists: Ben Mathis Michel Roger Once you've completed a tutorial, begin again, armed with new skills, and with your own creativity and style. We only need so many Joan of Arc's around, and are always eager to see what the next "Mustra" by applying his own original thoughts to time-tested processes and techniques described there.
  5. Low Poly Male WIP

    INVERSED - regarding the texture, see the textured model in "Concept Perspective 2" above.
  6. Low Poly Male WIP

    Thank you for your continued help. Looking back at the early suggestions and renderings, the changes look so obvious now. The comments are helping my work give a convincing effect. I've tweaked the upper arm a bit. I reduced the width of the neck at the base, and still would like to reduce neck width for this implementation. Looked back at some references. Added a real texture, which created some new questions about muscle groups. For example, the pectorals are distorted. Also, will need a hand texture. Concept Perspective 2
  7. C++

    ZinkForb - You may find Microsoft DirectX tutorials to be a quicker way to get started. I love OpenGL and DX, and would just guess Visual C++/DX tutorials might get you up and running with low frustration. That said, I wouldn't jump into any 3D graphics libraries without doing at least a few C++ tutorials. If C++ for dummies was frustrating to you, graphic API documentation might be a bit too much to ask. If you have a lot of experience with other languages, you already know what's reasonable to expect in the first few months with a new language.
  8. Low Poly Male WIP

    Anna - made the legs longer. Edward - could you be more specific? Perhaps you refer to the slope of the forehead - and agree. sunandshadow - I've added an edge loop to the upper arm. I find it still a work in progress. Perhaps the profile is approaching what it should be now. All - I've found orthographic renderings are better for judging proportion, but if the viewer expects perspective, it can be misleading. For example, in the orthographic left views, the hand appeared to clearly be too small. But, in retrospect, that may have been because we expected it to be enlarged by perspective. Also, I'm finding hair and clothes can greatly effect our perception of the figure's proportion. I've attached a link to a quick dress-up of the model under a perspective rendering as food for thought on this topic. The dress-up matches one of my concepts which I will post at some later date. Clearly, the semi-clothed, non-bald, perspective rendering identifies new areas for concern, and obscures some of the older issues. However, it is my goal to correct as many of your issues as possible in the base mesh so as not to propogate errors in form to the all my characters. Concept Perspective
  9. Fishman - critiques?

    I think the sketch does what it needs to for concept art. It fills the gap between an idea or written description and the specific artistic decisions needed by the modeller. Well done in that regard. I agree with Anonymous regarding background choice. Not a serious issue, but it would enhance the work to place it against something less active. Let our eyes rest on the subject of the work. In fact, I'd guess this picture would appear significantly stronger with that one trivial change. As for shading comment, one can go too far with shading in the concepts. On the other hand, unshaded silhouettes don't really describe all the 3D volumes the concept should be defining. That's the case here, and in my opinion some minimal shading would really enhance your concept. Lastly, I'd think through what this pose communicates about how this concept would move in the water. It does have that Japanese winding dragon kind of feel, but it also makes one feel a bit crowded with too much water resistance to be in that position in the water. Perhaps he's bundled up to build power for a kick! That's about it, nice job sunandshadow. I like the feel of the character and bet it would be a really good looking model with some high-quality textures and underwater shading applied!
  10. Low Poly Male WIP

    Here are the updates to the eyes, lips, brow edge loop, cheek edge loop, calf width, forearm width, neck and some other areas as per suggestions. Still awaiting recommended upper arm shaping for which I may require another edge loop. wire-front-3 wire-left-3 wire-face-front-3 wire-face-left-3 Improvements/ideas always welcomed.
  11. Low Poly Male WIP

    As per above suggestions, reduced leg depth, neck depth, lengthened hand slightly. Perhaps the changes are not enough. Enlarged output. Provided close ups of head. wire-front-2 wire-left-2 wire-front-face-2 wire-left-face-2 Thanks Anonymous - any additional specifics are appreciated.
  12. Low Poly Male WIP

    It's just portfolio work at this point, Artifex.
  13. Low Poly Male WIP

    Valuable comments - will update accordingly.
  14. Low Poly Male WIP

    Please post feedback on this low-poly male mesh. He is budgeted at 1400 triangles, with another 1600 available for clothes, hair, possessions. He'll be used as a template and modified to match various concepts, so much of the geometry will be reworked in any specific implementation. However, as a template, the edge-looping, anatomical proportion, animation/deformation should be perfected at this stage. Thanks in advance for helping me to do so. wire-front-01.jpg wire-left-01.jpg