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jRaskell

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  1. I think to an extent ambidexterity could be taught/learned, but for most people would just require double the effort, or perhaps more than double. The truly ambidextrous are those that learn HOW to do something, and are naturally able to do it both ways without any additional effort. Myself, I'm a bit of an oddity, a mixed bag. I write right-handed. In soccer my left leg was the dominant leg. In baseball I had a MUCH better batting average batting left handed. My first two years in middle school I struggled to get above a .150 average batting right. My third year I switch hit. In High School I hit exclusively left handed and was averaging in the low-mid .200s range. And it wasn't just a getting better over time thing. There was a noticable step change when switching from right to left, and vice versa, there still is, as I occasionally go to the batting cages for fun. Basketball, I shoot right handed though. I am left eye dominant though, which makes firing a gun a challenge. Golf, I swing right handed. My right arm is physically stronger than my left arm. My left leg is physically stronger than my right leg, so much so that it's readily noticable in Karate classes and when I used to spar. Right handed in Ping Pong, but I can also play only slightly worse left handed.
  2. The real problem with the industry today isn't where everyone thinks it is. The real problem isn't with the publishers and developers. The real problem is us consumers. We repeatedly and willingly pay good money for crap. Business is business, and there really is nothing wrong with that. They listen to one thing, money. Us consumers speak with our money, and what we tell Publishers is that we'll buy crap. You can bitch and moan and whine and complain all you want after you've purchased the product, but it means nothing until consumers start to really talk with their pockets. The developers and Publishers can be blamed for releasing crappy products, but only us consumers are to blame for buying crappy products.
  3. It's probably preferrable over having approximately 4 prongs. I've seen and used 2 and 3 prong forks in the past as well, though only a couple times with a 2 prong fork. could a skewer be considered a 1 prong fork? Historically speaking, I don't know.
  4. Quote:Original post by necreia Quote:Original post by Run_The_Shadows ... Send a bug report to Toady. Ahh, so I take it from that response that this was not what should have happened. Okay, I'll toss him one. I've run into the same problem myself. What's worse, is that you won't be able to flood that room again now. I got around it by placing the floodgate right at the very entrance to the mountain. Even one square in will result in an empty channel spot right in front of the floodgate after your first flooding. The game is still in alpha though, and Toady seems to be pretty responsive to reproducible problems. I've also had some relative success with hunting and trapping as well, though I started my first fortress in a calm, well forested location, so the results may be considerably different in more hostile territories.
  5. Quote:Original post by Ravuya Quote:Original post by Steadtler Yes, exactly. They dont want an impulse buy on a 20$ bargain to 'steal' an impulse buy on a 70$ new release. 90% of the cash they make on a regular game is done in the first month they release it. I usually only buy games when they drop to $20, and then at that point I buy about $300 worth of games that I kinda-sorta want at once. That way I avoid total shit, and make sure the games are patched and have extra user-built content available. I am still waiting for Half-Life 2 to drop to $20, but this seems like it will never happen. This "wad" of purchases blows the minds of the EB employees, who cannot believe their good fortune. Usually they try to sell me a pre-order for a new game, or some cards to get good prices on used games. One rather keen employee tried to sell me "disc protection" for my $20 games, for, uh, $10 apiece. The worst part is that they then press me repeatedly for these stupid point-of-sale gimmicks, figuring me for a sucker. I've walked out of EBs before after they fail to understand that I just want to spend some goddamn money on these new-in-box old games and that's it. It's rather irritating, and now most of the EB stores generally aren't offering older games (even budget re-releases of same) so they won't even let me attempt this buying pattern. I'd love to use Amazon but they sell everything at its original price ($70+ for NWN). Right now I just make trips to a local game enthusiast store, though they jack the price up pretty quick as a game becomes "rare" and attempt to engage me in conversation about my purchases. EB is deliberately trying to piss off the kind of customer who buys older games in bulk, and I'd wager they'd lose more every time I walk out than they get from a couple new game buyers at a time. Damn kids! Get off my lawn! You pretty much covered all the reasons why I won't go near any gaming storefronts anymore. 99% of my gaming related purchases are done online these days. No stupid teen employees bugging me about crap I have no interest in, and no having to deal with what the store feels is and isn't appropriate to keep stocked.
  6. I learned to cook from both my mother and my father, both of which are great cooks in their own rights, though they do tend to specialize on different things. Interestingly enough though, my mothers side of the family is more traditional in that it's the woman that does the majority of the cooking, where my fathers side is more balanced, and it's very common for the man to share in the cooking duties. I can't really say how the dishcleaning part was handled in the past though. With dishwashers being commonplace nowadays, it's pretty much a moot issue. As an additional data point, my youngest sister married a man that's a competent cook as well, while my three middle sisters all married men who expect the wife to do the cooking. Whether it has any bearing or not, my youngest sister's marriage is the only one that has survived.
  7. Is this call for real?
  8. Quote:Original post by Puzzler183 So let me get this straight. Black people still call each other niggers, but yet, they get offended when someone puts up a billboard that is obviously not racist but yet has a connection to some obscure thing from more than a century ago? Right... The simple truth is, there are a whole lot of people out there that are simply looking for things to be offended by.
  9. I would keep the item details in a seperate table. The inventory table itself is then just a handful of id fields. Properly indexed, this will result in a very fast and efficient query, and you don't have to worry about how many records are in the table itself because each record is very small, Memory footprint really shouldn't be an issue.
  10. Quote:Original post by digitalfreak don't say a bad deed is right just because you don't like what it hurts. be objective. illegal deed is illegal. I don't view legality and right/wrong as being one in the same. Illegal actions are not always wrong, and legal actions are not always right. I'm not trying to justify any of the alleged actions being discussed in this thread. My original words against Ubisoft may have been a bit strong, though the one statement I always stand by, you get what you pay for.
  11. Quote:Original post by owl "Being in love" to me, is a psychological and physiological state in which your mind gets convinced that the person you feel atracted too is perfect in almost every aspect you could wish. This usually comes along with a state of depression when you are not with the person in question and a rush when you make any kind of contact. There is an intense desire of being with that person even if sex is not guarrantied to happen. Woa there! That sounds more like a definition of obsessive infatuation than "being in love".
  12. I wouldn't really be concerned with WoWs source code as it's of little value without the servers to run the game itself. Other games, well, if it's being outsourced to cut costs, then my thoughts are you get what you pay for. I'm rather in support of just about any events that are detrimental to Ubisoft because I'm not at all fond of any of their business practices. There are a couple companies in the industry I feel this way about, though I won't mention any others as that's off topic to this thread. And I've heard nothing regarding Flagship studios providing Hellgate: London's source code to any outside groups, nor can I see why they would do so. If the code is written with internationalization in mind, the efforts, even for Asian languages, can be done with minimal exposure to the games core source code.
  13. There's theory, and then there's practice. The only real results are in practice. There may or may not be any detrimental affects to short term fasting, but I am quite positive there are ZERO positive affects to it when compared with a long term permanent lifestyle change designed to drop your weight to a specific target. You said yourself.. Quote:Original post by ArchGAs long as you arn't retarded about it and not binge after it's over and adjust your calorie intake to fit your new weight, I don't see how you would gain the weight back either.. The key to long term success is developing the eating habits to hit that caloric intake for your target weight right from the very beginning. Maintain that caloric intake, add proper exercise, and you have THE long term plan for successful, permanent weight loss. To put it short and sweet, long term thinking gets long term results.
  14. I must say, after having read a number of his threads and posts, I must nominate The C modest god as the Poster Boy for allowing User Ratings to go negative. I find it extremely difficult to believe this person is studying any sort of engineering at a University. I won't argue that Oblivion (and it's predecessors) is a buggy game. It is also far more complex than most other games out there. RPGs as a genre tend to be some of the most complex games in the market. These days they are all very large scale and very intricate. Ones like Oblivion come with 100+ hours of gameplay without including any sort of replayability. Hundreds of quests, thousands of items, in Oblivions case over 1000 NPCs as well. Tons of scripting. The logistics involved with this game are enormous. Few gamers even come close to comprehending the scope of creating such a game, and it's obvious that The C modest god doesn't either.
  15. Walmart was a lot more strict and conservative about the products it sold back when good ole Sam was still alive and running things. Since his death the company has loosened their belts a bit.