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NoobProger

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  1. I've learned from the get-go that you've got to practice what you've learned, and I do so - I complete all 3 off the question/exercises at the end of the chapters... and from time to time I sit down and have a rather randomized session of coding (I'll make a calculator... a program that takes/stores/saves a list of entered data to a .txt file, text based RPG's...(very short ones.) - all the things that simply let me apply what I've learned.) Maybe the problem is that in turn the book is not detailed enough in C++, and that it has a rough over-view of how to program in relation to GAMES, and simply not enough information for me to learn to program C++ in general... this is only my second book on C++, the first which was small also (in detail) I thought it would be more important to try to grasp the concepts of programming at first rather then the syntax... I'll give that rock - paper - scissors game a go and see how things turn out. Thanks for the tutorials and links - I'll be checking them out guys.
  2. Ok so I've been learning C++ for afew months now, and I'm pretty bad at remembering the syntax of the language, but I remember the how everything works. I understand... data types, functions, refs, pointers... and when I step'd into the wonderful world of classes I got it at first... but the book quickly moved onto more indetailed subjects about OOP... and I feel like I'm lost at some points... once the book explains the syntax in full detail I understand it.. I've been reading about OOP now for about 2 weeks, and I feel I can't even remember how to program regular things (to program without the use of classes, just functions with refs and pointers...) should I back off the reading throttle, and let my mind take everything in, or push forward and keep learning about classes, inheritance, and polymorphism? I can make functions... or methods I guess they are called in classes rather easy... I understand private and public... and attributes as well... but I can't hang onto the syntax for anything, its annoying to refer back to a book over and over again when I'm trying to make something rather simple. Either way just figure'd I would vent about how I should of maybe went with C# first... Just joking I'm happy with C++, just wondering what some of you vets did when learning... Thanks in advance. BTW - reading "Beginning C++ Game Programming" - Michael Dawson. Its my second book in C++ - the first was a quick start primer book.
  3. I understand why you think you are to old - alot of programmers start at a very young age, often teens (not in my case) and sometimes that can put a starter off... or make you feel that "others have had a major head start". But its not entirely true. I've meet people that have been trying to learn C++ for about a year, and they aren't really sure how to even use the console yet for simple C libs. Programming isn't for everyone, just because the fellas that took that networking classes didn' stick with it, or got put off by it doesn't mean YOU can't do it. Try - and I am also worried about the math, but take it one step at a time. People say study long, hard hours - if you've got the motivation great, but remember not to cram TO MUCH or you'll be rereading things over and over again. ALWAYS put what you've learned to use! ALWAYS, don't just read the chapter, and type the source code in the chapter... rewrite it, make it your own, or write it from scratch to get the program goals in that chapter done without reading their source code (you'll be looking back and forth in the pages alot as your first start, but then you'll find yourself flipping less and less so don't sweat it.). The thing I can't stress the most from my learning is that you won't understand everything the first time you read it. As odd as that sounds, try not to stress on what you don't understand all the way.
  4. I kind of agree with the above - but only for the simple fact that you said " it's just I have never gotten to the point where it didn't horribly bore and confuse the hell out of me." Everytime I open my C++ books, I enjoy learning new things and even get excited sometimes about learning how to communicate with a computer... (please don't think differently of me people.) I can't draw if my life depended upon it - nor would I be able to do much else rather then code (which I'm still rather horrible at, but getting better.) You've got to be passionate about it, or maybe its just not your cup of tea... Either way if you are interested still, you have to understand that learning to program they are going to teach you concepts and methods that won't entirely click the first time you read them, and that you won't get alot of things at first... but after you read afew books, things start to click. (Read the books, don't just read over them, pretain the things they are saying, or reread them. You don't have to understand them all entirely at first, but atleast know of them) Try different methods of learning, I don't grasp ANYTHING I read online tutorial wise, with these free books etc,. I've got to have a paper-back infront of me... but I know of other people that are other way around. If you're having a real hard time getting on your feet in coding, I'd suggest going with Python like alot of fellas say.
  5. I'm learning C++ as my first language, and I'm starting to understand it - everyone says start with C# first because simple things that you won't have to worry about (like memory management if I'm correct, I'm still a noob myself) I was going to learn VB 6.0 as my first language... (LOL) but then someone made a real good point... "You're going to get used to the simplicity of that language and when you attempt to apply what you've learned to C++ it will just put you off to it, C++ requires that you to do more... plus VB 6.0 is pretty old dummy." Don't move away from one language to another because one is 'faster' to learn, you just have to stick at either one you choose to learn first... 3 tips from mistakes I've made while trying to learn C++ (if you pick to learn it) 1) Read books, and reread parts of the book you've think you've forgotten, or are unclear on (DONT GET STUCK IN ONE PART, Move on and come back but don't sit in one part, you won't get or understand everything you read the first time you read it...) 2) Read small books. No need to jump into C++ books that are 1000 pages long and have a very large section in detail on classes, functions - you only want to learn the basics then learn more details of the basics later. 3) MAKE YOUR OWN PROGRAMS. It was until I've covered afew books that I realized I could read code and understand it, but when I tried to apply my own I'd fall on my face... same thing as learning to drive a car - you can be told which pedal is the brake, and the gas - but you've got to drive it yourself to learn how to get it to operate smoothly. The learning curve of C++ is a monster. Grab afew cigars, get a nice book, bring the laptop outside, and read away while we still have good weather. Or just ignore this post in its entirety... I'm still a noob here myself.
  6. I mean I COULD use someones pointer, or someones ref example - but I wouldn't understand whats really going on, thus in my own opinion I'd be typing code I don't really even understand(I understand how refs and pointers work - or atleast I think I do - but I haven't a clue for remembering the syntax yet... I guess thats what I mean.) I've learned abit about references, and abit about pointers but I don't feel comfortable with them yet. For the most part I've just learned functions, how to return things from them and place arguments... I know how to type these lines of code, but with pointers and refs I'm still in the dark. After asking about removing the switch statement I realized I over looked some posts... (checked at work, then went over it again at work, guess I just missed it.) I'll try to apply some of those snips you supplied. Thanks.
  7. Ok well I had some time today so I did a small revamp on my very first program (while taking a break from learning about refs and pointers) So I imporved the program abit to help handle if the user inputs a incorrect answer - rather then just having the program ignore invalid input and move on... heh... No longer declaring listv or the iter as a global - as I've started to learn how to correctly use functions (started, didn't say I was entirely using them correctly.) //gamelist.cpp //the exercise asked that I make the following program use these functions. //get a list started //store a list //remove items form a list //display the list #include <iostream> #include <vector> #include <string> using namespace std; void display(const vector<string>& listv); char askYesNo(string question); int main() { vector<string> listv; vector<string>::iterator iter; system("TITLE My very first - try not to laugh to hard."); string add; char add_another; char display_list; char remove_game; cout << "Welcome to the game list program\n"; cout << "You'll be able to store games on the list, and remove them!\n"; do { cout << "Type in the name of a game you liked to store it.\n"; cin >> add; listv.push_back(add); system("CLS"); cout << "GAME SAVED TO LIST!\n"; add_another = askYesNo("Would you like to add another game to the list?"); }while((add_another == 'Y') || (add_another == 'y')); char reply = askYesNo("Would you like to see your list of games?"); if (reply == 'y' || reply == 'Y') { system("CLS"); display(listv); } char remove_another; char reply_remove = askYesNo("Now that you've got a list - would you like to remove any games?"); if (reply_remove == 'y' || reply_remove == 'Y') { do { char number; system("CLS"); cout << "Which game would you like to remove?\n"; for (int i = 0; i < listv.size(); ++i) cout << listv[i] << endl; cout << "Enter a number for the game that wasn't a good favorite\n"; cout << "If you are done removing games, type [done]\n"; cin >> number; switch(number) { case '1': cout << "Deleting the first game listed.\n"; listv.erase(listv.begin()); break; case '2': cout << "Deleting the second game listed.\n"; listv.erase(listv.begin() + 1); break; case '3': cout << "Deleting the 3rd game listed.\n"; listv.erase(listv.begin() + 2); break; case '4': cout << "Deleting the 4th game listed.\n"; listv.erase(listv.begin() + 3); break; case '5': cout << "Deleting the 5th game listed.\n"; listv.erase(listv.begin() + 4); break; default: cout << "Invalid input - remove a item from the list.\n"; cout << "using a number 1 - 5.\n"; break; } remove_another = askYesNo("Would you like to remove another from the list?"); }while (remove_another == 'y' || remove_another == 'Y'); } cout << "Here is a list of your finished favorites!\n"; display(listv); system("pause"); return 0; } void display(const vector<string>& listv) { cout << "Your current list!\n"; for (int i = 0; i < listv.size(); ++i) cout << listv[i] << endl; } char askYesNo(string question) { char reply; do { cout << question << " [Y or N]"; cin >> reply; }while ((reply != 'y') && (reply != 'n')); return reply; } I still want to get rid of the switch statement, but at this time I'm not really sure how to or what would be a good tool to remove things from the list (keep in mind I'm not trying to use anything I haven't learned yet.)
  8. Not at all - quote away - just make sure you give it a nice noob stamp that fits me. Heh. I'm going to rewrite the gamelist program I made and I'll most likely repost it in a week or so with new things I've learned and tried to apply... I'm sure I'll say more creative things like that along the way.
  9. As much as I hated the idea of buying a non-game orientated C++ book, I knew I would have to. I started with "C++ Programming, Larry Ullman, Andreas Singer" its one of them quick start books - it covers pretty much eveything (but not in a high level of detail). The book has several typos, more so toward the end which was a put off! Now I'm on to "Beginning C++ Game Programming, Michael Dawson" for the most part I feel I'm reading the same thing over, but from a different point of view... (as I'm starting to learn, with C++ there are alot of ways to write code at which will still have the same end result) I can't wait to get started with Windows APIs, DirectX APIs - and just plain BLITTIN TO THE SCREEN. I'm interested in mainly 2D strategy games if you've got any nice links while we are at it...
  10. Yes! This is the type of replies I wanted to see - and fast to. Thanks guys I'll be sure to look over them in more detail once I've got more time. (just quickly scan'd over them) I was feeling abit okward when I made the switch statement, like I was using a wrench to drive a nail into the deck, when I have a nice hammer right beside me... :) Also I didn't know I could use cout to set the title of the program as same with the system, just learned that little line of code from a random online tutorial. Nice to see you could just use cout also. And declaring the variables right before use makes alot more sense... I kept scrolling to the top of main() to make sure I was using the correct name... tehehe. I'll get into the habbit of {}'s it also seems like good habbit. that last function rewrite also cleared things up on how to reference a list. Thats what I was wondering, but I just couldn't remember the code needed to do the task - this mean I'm starting to get ready for a ref book? :D Thanks again.
  11. Yeah the reason it is not OOP is because people told me it would be alot more simple if I learned the lango and worry about how to apply different programing styles later... they said don't worry about classes off the start... but as you said that is my next thing I'll be triyng to tackle. Yeah I could have made the code abit more clearer and should have condenced alot of sections of it - but I wanted to apply alot of things I've already learned in my first program... I hear that its one thing to learn it, but its another to apply it. I might have taken drivers-education to learn which pedals which, but you still have to learn to drive for yourself.
  12. Ok I've been learning C++ for afew months now as my first lango ever - and with that said I took a stab at one of the exercises in a book I'm using. Keep in mind I'm still learning, and there are concepts I've already learned about but unable to apply in this program because well... I know of them, just not how to use them... if ya follow. So either way have a good laugh if ya want... The reason I'm posting this is to get help from you vets on how I could have make this program better, its really buggy... little things like typing a string to long to add to the list makes the program jump all over the place... adding more then 5 items to the list (you wouldn't be able to remove anything past 5 on the list, I didn't make the switch big enough... could I have used a enumerator here? I didn't get around to using int MAX_LIST yet either to limit the list size. saved that for verison 2.0 :X) //gamelist.cpp //the exercise asked that I make the following program use these functions. //get a list started //store a list //remove items form a list //display the list #include <iostream> #include <vector> #include <string> using namespace std; vector<string> listv; // I know that declaring a global variable, like this is bad if over used. vector<string>::iterator iter; //and that its not good practice - I plan to rewrite this whole thing. //the reason I declare these is because I don't know how else to add to the vector (via in functions like main AND display)unless its declared here. //if I declare it in the main function my display function cannot see it (keep in mind I'm still learning making functions of my //own) and if I declare it in my function itself (display)I make a seperate list in that function... //I'm sure I might be able to user a pointer or something, but the problem is I still don't fully understand that. //the reason I wrote this program was because of a book exercise that was given to me. It is my very first time writing //c++ code entirely by myself... with that said it barely works. I've been learning C++ for afew months... first time //learning any programming lango. void display(); int main() { //vector<string> listv; -commented out until I learn how to get my function to reference this. //vector<string>::iterator iter; -same as above. system("TITLE My very first - try not to laugh to hard."); string add; int MAX_LIST = 5; char add_another; char display_list; char remove_game; cout << "Welcome to the game list program\n"; cout << "You'll be able to store games on the list, and remove them!\n"; do { cout << "Type in the name of a game you liked to store it.\n"; cin >> add; listv.push_back(add); system("CLS"); cout << "GAME SAVED TO LIST!\n"; cout << "Would you like to add another game to the list?[Y or N]\n"; cin >> add_another; }while((add_another == 'Y') || (add_another == 'y')); cout << "Would you like to see your list of games?[Y or N]\n"; cin >> display_list; if (display_list == 'y' || display_list == 'Y') { system("CLS"); display(); } cout << "Now that you've got a list - would you like to remove any games?[Y or N]\n"; cin >> remove_game; do { char number; system("CLS"); cout << "Which game would you like to remove?\n"; for (int i = 0; i < listv.size(); ++i) cout << listv[i] << endl; cout << "Enter a number for the game that wasn't a good favorite\n"; cout << "If you are done removing games, type [done]\n"; cin >> number; switch(number) { case '1': cout << "Deleting the first game listed.\n"; listv.erase(listv.begin()); break; case '2': cout << "Deleting the second game listed.\n"; listv.erase(listv.begin() + 1); break; case '3': cout << "Deleting the 3rd game listed.\n"; listv.erase(listv.begin() + 2); break; case '4': cout << "Deleting the 4th game listed.\n"; listv.erase(listv.begin() + 3); break; case '5': cout << "Deleting the 5th game listed.\n"; listv.erase(listv.begin() + 4); break; default: cout << "Invalid input - remove a item from the list.\n"; cout << "using a number 1 - 5.\n"; break; } cout << "Would you like to remove another?[Y or N]\n"; cin >> add_another; }while((add_another == 'Y') || (add_another == 'y')); cout << "Here is a list of your finished favorites!\n"; display(); system("pause"); return 0; } void display() { cout << "Your current list!\n"; for (int i = 0; i < listv.size(); ++i) cout << listv[i] << endl; } [Edited by - NoobProger on September 3, 2007 12:06:48 PM]
  13. Ravuya - LOL Binky is great, it makes me feel like a kid again!
  14. I've been learning C++ for afew months now, and I want to stick with it - problem is there is really no one for me to talk to about what I've learned 'cept for good ol' GameDev.net. I don't plan on taking any college classes or anything of that such but I'm interested in chatting with anyone about what I've learned (which isn't much, I myself am still playing around with text in a console window.) Either way it seems hard to have learned all this stuff, and have no one to really share it with, explain it to - or anything for that matter... I understand your post completely. :)
  15. Yeah just a side note from one NOOB to another Tangent - I've been learning C++ for afew months now, and I've LEARNED alot ... but I realized I don't really know how to create any of my own projects - or atleast its hard for me to look at the bigger picture of even completein' a small program. Reading books and following the source code they give is lovely and all for understanding things and how C++ works, but you need to write your own code to really learn how to use C++... if yanno what I mean... start with the console programs, make a simple calculator or something then try to work your way up - it sucks trying to learn to game program and not even being able to display images yet... but whats happening in text in the console window will later translate to images and their properties... I guess - I'm just a noob. Heh.