Swordmaster

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  1. Question about graphics of an older game

      Do you mean using video capture as 'reference footage' for motion capture or something else?  Also when it comes to photographing objects that don't exist in the real world, what are your thoughts on something like claymation?  Does the game industry still use this technique?  If you ever played the first Mortal Kombat, the character Goro was developed using this technique and made it look pretty realistic.  http://www.joystiq.com/2009/06/22/mortal-kombats-goro-actual-size/     @Hodgman,  thanks for the thorough insight.  In regards to the problem of the T-pose example, what if instead you took different photos of the person?  As an example one with the subject facing the sun or light and the other with palms facing away.  I don't know if this has been tried before but even it has, is there any hardware and game engine that could handle fluid unoticeable switching between said 'light and shadow maps' (sorry, I'm not shure of technical terms yet) based on the orietation of the the games 'camera' and how the player sees the game objects?  I'm sure this would be a lot of work though.  No argument there.   Also, I'm probably just misunderstanding, but what is the purpose of using all white walls as opposed to a traditional green or blue walls?  And what kind of lights are actually used light the room?  Aside from what you've explained to me though, why is it that as realistic as games are starting to look today (such evidenced by that in-engine render of the face you posted), that even realtime gameplay is still discernable to the naked eye between simulated and real-world (such as the game Ryse)?  Graphically speaking of course.  I imagine it has to to with the lighting and ray tracing, and correct me if I'm wrong here.  Whatever the reason, realtime graphics have not been perfected when it comes to gameplay as of yet.  At least in my eyes, as others may see things differently.   All of you have been very helpful though.  Thanks again.
  2. Question about graphics of an older game

    Thank you Hodgman for clearing that up.  I don't know if you'd agree with me in asking you this, but why can't more recent game entries look this real?  So would it be correct to say if I was to use the same sort of photo mapping technique they used for this game, it would be a trade off of not having dynamic lighting in favor of this more 'photorealistic' look and vice versa?
  3. Question about graphics of an older game

    Thank you both for your help.  It occured to me to look up the entry on wikipedia and to my surprise it mentions this under 'Development':  "The in-game characters were created using a technology called "digital skin", which involved digitizing reference photographs of live actors and mapping them onto 3-D models"  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_Gods_(video_game)   Can anyone go into more detail about this?  DId they use video cameras?   Yeah C0lumbo, that grainy look adds to the realism somehow.
  4. There was an arcade game entitled 'War Gods' back in the 90's, and I remember it for having in particularly photorealistic character models (more so for one character at the least; Vallah).  Which at this time could be considered the infant stages of 3D games to some.   Anyways, this follwing video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ro8icXuBkP8  shows some gameplay from said game.  To me at least, the character Vallah, has quite realistic looking skin and sheen for a game of that era anyways.  I mean, I look at some 3D games nowadays and while I can see a step in the right direction... many triple-A games end up looking almost 'cartoonish' in their final product, intentional or not.  Case in point; the most recent Mortal Kombat or Killer instinct.  I'm not saying this game looks 100% realistic either, but I think the developers did a pretty god job with the visuals considering it's age and in comparison to the aforementioned games.   My question is this though...  technically speaking, how did the 3D modelers achieve this look?  Did they do anything out of the norm from current games?  I know video talent is sited in the credits along with the actors that played the character.  What exactly is 'video talent' though? I'm quite new to all the inner workings of 3D, so maybe someone can enlighten me on the matter.  Also I know this game may not be the best example, but it's the best example I can give.    Thank you to anyone who can offer me any advice.
  5. Where can I go about designing video games?

      Since you have experience in recruiting non pros, can you tell me how hard it was to actually do that?  What is or was your role in the team and were your team members local to you?  I was wondering if you could tell me (if you know), if starting an online team has any good success rates of completing a project?  That is a team of people that live outside your city or further?  The reason i ask is because I'm a budding artists that's not where he wants to be skill wise, and with what I believe to be 'unorthodox' ideas when it comes to game features, elements or presentation.  Not game design per se but more 'protypical' concepts, such as a character customiztion feature in a 3d fighting game that revolves around fighting styles.  I won't go to in depth here, but all I can say is I've never seen it done before and would like to see this game come to fruition.   Anyways if I build a design document that outlines key points of all the aspects of a game (or at least most of them), do you think that in itself is enough for others to take interest in what I'm presenting?  My plan was to get some sort of prototype going with a team and see if we can do a Kickstarter project once we have the protoype complete.  So then i can possibly get more people on board for the project and pay each team member (equally maybe?) with the Kickstarter funds to finish the game.  Is this something that sounds feasible, or how would you go about it?  Can you offer me any more advice on the subject of hobbyist developmen or experinces you have had while in a team?  Anything to expect or not, etc.?   Also, I'm sure PC would be my best bet for which platform to develop on correct?  Thank you for any advice you can offer me.
  6. The State of the Indie World

      What games do you mean when you say 'cookie cutter games' ?    If your game isn't getting noticed over these cookie cutter games maybe people actually prefer these games over yours.       I agree and disagree with that statement for these reasons.   Yes becuase consumers are going to buy and like whatever they want.  No becuase some 'cookie cutter games' are being designed with the mentality of copying other games to an extreme degree.  I'll be honest and say I don't know if game devs that copy many 'original' game ideas actually profit.  But personally I find content creators who just want to copy other peoples ideas and call it their own to be frauds.    You can always borrow ideas but when you don't come up with anything original and you are profiting on a game where you just changed things up only a little, then I feel you don't have a leg to stand on.  And I'm talking about most aspects of development (art, music, game design, the games theme)   This is all of course subjective to each person, but in my book that's a cookie cutter game.   That why I don't understand why some folks on here say ideas are a dime a dozen.  Which again is all opinion based.  But to me the best analogy would be the reception of a singer to the public.  Some people think that screaming vocals sound terrible and prefer something cleaner, and vice versa.   At the end of the day, I'm just going to make the game that I want becuase it pleases me to see my creation on screen.  And hope others find interest in too, becuase they see what I see in the product and know it was a labor of passion. 
  7. Questions about game development platforms

    Thanks guys. I appreciate the answers. I have some questions though if that's okay. 1. How hard is it to program in Flash, since I would most likely be making a game by myself. 2. Is there a market for Flash games on PC? If so what type of games should I be making and where should I promote them? 3. Would you guys recommend using Flash over something like the Python language for someone new to programming? And why? 4. Does Flash support 3D? 5. If I understand correctly (from what I've been told) games where your character can roam freely in 3D space are harder to program than ones in a 2D space? Is this right? Or how does it work? I'm really quite new to game development, so forgive me if some of the things I said aren't accurate. My true passion is really art, but I'll delve into programming also if it's necessary to makes games.
  8. Can anyone list the platforms you can make games on that would be relevant to a hobbyist developer like myself (or provide links to articles)? Along with whatever else is needed to create the games, like other software, and what the advantages and disadvantages and requirements are for developing on a respective platform. Thank you.
  9. Thank you DarklyDreaming. Can you elaborate on what you mean by this: "[i]Don't be mistaken, you can certainly create a fairly simple 3D game if you are determined and smart enough with a reasonable amount of time investment. But it will have to be a [i]very [/i]simple concept or it'll get awefully complex dangerously fast[/i]" What is considered a very simple concept? I think I might end up going the indie route though, even if mistakes are made. I was speaking to a friend and he said the creator of [i]Mount & Blade[/i], sought help online by posting his vision of what he wanted in the game to many forums, and many people contributed since they really liked his idea. Does anyone know the details about the development of this game? For example, did he pay the people who worked on his idea and did it start as a commercial venture? I can't find any of this info on the game. Hodgman, I forgot to ask you, but when you said this, "[i]Also importantly, you've got to realise that your first attempts at game-dev are going to be flawed.[/i]" Okay, well what is it that makes someones attempt at game development flawed? Is it lack of knowledge? Because if so, can't someone just come to a forum such as this or go to school to learn about their respective practice? Is there something I'm missing here? I get that doing this as a hobby is potentially unstable, but can't other team members pick up where other team members who took leave on the project left off?
  10. ApochPiQ, Thank you again. You answered all my questions. And given the information you just provided me, my only other question is what are the chances a publisher would green light a new fighting game specifically, by a company I start? If lets say in the future I do start a company and my team members and I are known to have good track records in delivering a shipped product. I ask because one doesn't really see any new fighting game IP's coming from large companies within the U.S. Do you by chance know why this is? Also forgot to ask, can games in 3d space still be considered simple games? And if so, to what extent is this simplicity constrained to? Thanks to all who contributed to this thread.
  11. [quote name='PropheticEdge' timestamp='1316225477' post='4862663'] [quote name='Swordmaster' timestamp='1316223623' post='4862658'] @ApochPiQ, To that specific question, no. But game development won't put anybodies life in danger if mistakes are made. If your talking about the massive undertaking of work put into something like a triple-A game, then wouldn't that all depend on the skills of the team I recruit and the amount of people on it? As well as how much work they're actually willing to put in, no matter how long it takes? @GHMP, So are you saying that I would have to release the project as freeware because my team wouldn't get any money out of it? Because they would, and part of the money they get would come from whatever earnings we make from the game. And possibly whatever I can pay them during the course of development, if they're open to that. Also can you define what in your mind a simple game is? Because I think everyone one has a different idea of what constitutes as one. And does anyone have an answer to the question I made earlier about blood effects? [/quote] You could potentially implement flowing blood type stuff in most any 3D engine. An engine is not wholly mutable. But but but! Question for you. Do you play fighting games? If so, which ones and how do you play them? Are you an enthusiast, someone who just kind of likes them, or a tourney level player? What is your goal for this game? [/quote] I understand the first sentence in your answer, but why do you go on to say "an engine is not wholly mutable?" Thanks by the way. I grew up playing fighters like Mortal Kombat and Street Fighter and was really influenced by these types of games. Then I started playing Virtua Fighter and Soul Calibur on the PS2, but I sold it. I know many fighters are incredibly well thought out when it comes to game play. I wanted to get back into Soul Calibur, so I can study it closely and implement similar mechanics from it into my project once I buy a new console. Either this or get someone else who knows more about fighting games than I do and have them work on designing the game play. I think I may be setting the bar too high though, as I don't know how long it would take me to learn these games in and out and become a high level player. Or if could even find someone to help me who knows about such things. Do you have any advice you can give me on the matter? But this is the reason I come asking you guys, because I don't have anyone to guide me in the right direction. [quote name='ApochPiQ' timestamp='1316228541' post='4862674'] [quote name='Swordmaster' timestamp='1316223623' post='4862658'] @ApochPiQ, To that specific question, no. But game development won't put anybodies life in danger if mistakes are made. If your talking about the massive undertaking of work put into something like a triple-A game, then wouldn't that all depend on the skills of the team I recruit and the amount of people on it? As well as how much work they're actually willing to put in, no matter how long it takes? [/quote] The question doesn't have anything to do with putting lives in danger or anything like that. Suppose nobody was ever going to [i]cross[/i] your bridge, thereby rendering its safety moot. Would you still build a Golden Gate replica first? The point is that you don't have the skills to make that bridge yet. You need to learn the fundamentals of engineering, of materials, of physics, of harmonics (c.f. the infamous Tacoma Narrows incident), of any number of managerial and practical tasks - you have to know [i]a lot of stuff[/i] to build a bridge on that scale. Your bridge won't even come close to existing if all you've ever built is a house of cards. Maybe you don't have all the prerequisite knowledge in materials, and the concrete shatters as it hardens. Maybe you don't know basic engineering, and the cables snap. Maybe you don't know physics, and the impact of a bird walking along one of the cables destabilizes the entire construct. Maybe you don't know harmonics, and a gentle breeze causes your bridge to oscillate at its natural resonant frequency and collapse. Maybe you don't know basic organizational skills and you can't actually get the crew of thousands of manual laborers needed to actually construct the thing. There are almost certainly many other aspects to building bridges that I don't know about, so I can't even suggest where things might go wrong. As Hodgman already said, throwing more people (or time) at it isn't a magic solution. A thousand monkeys will never build the Golden Gate Bridge no matter how much time you give them. One brilliant architect will never build the bridge either. You have to hit a critical mass of skill, time, money, manpower, and dedication - for both bridges [i]and[/i] games. Realistically? You personally will not be able to recruit the people or skill sets you need to build your dream game unless you have huge amounts of money to command. Don't have a couple million dollars to commit to the project? Sorry, all the talent will go work for someone who can actually pay them. Even if you do have the cash, you'd have to be a managerial genius (or at least a very experienced businessman with good sense for delegation) to wrangle the team for the several years it would take to produce the game. Nobody is trying to suggest that you can't reach that point eventually; obviously, people make great, huge games all the time. But they don't just wake up one day and go do it. There are prerequisites, and trying to ignore them will only lead to frustration and failure. [/quote] I hear what you're saying and it makes sense. And so then, what would you suggest if I want to keep heading in the path of game development? Since I'm an aspiring 3d modeler, I've been learning a lot about how to model in 3d applications from tutorials on the web. Is my only recourse to try to make it into a large company? I mean, what are the chances that one day a publisher will green light an idea I have and would the game turn out anywhere close to how I'd like it to?
  12. @ApochPiQ, To that specific question, no. But game development won't put anybodies life in danger if mistakes are made. If your talking about the massive undertaking of work put into something like a triple-A game, then wouldn't that all depend on the skills of the team I recruit and the amount of people on it? As well as how much work they're actually willing to put in, no matter how long it takes? @GHMP, So are you saying that I would have to release the project as freeware because my team wouldn't get any money out of it? Because they would, and part of the money they get would come from whatever earnings we make from the game. And possibly whatever I can pay them during the course of development, if they're open to that. Also can you define what in your mind a simple game is? Because I think everyone one has a different idea of what constitutes as one. And does anyone have an answer to the question I made earlier about blood effects?
  13. Thanks for the reply. But why would I need to treat this as a freeware project? If and when I complete the game, wouldn't it benefit my team and I more, to release a demo version for free instead? And charge for the full version? Also, why do I need to make simple games first? And the reason I ask about the blood effects is because I'm worried that if I start working within a specific engine, that I won't be able to implement that feature in the future due to some limitation in the engine.
  14. Hey everyone. I had a few questions about game development and thought, what better place to turn than Gamedev! [list][*]Generally speaking how long would it take to make a 3d fighter, or any 3d game for that matter with an indie team? And what specific type of personnel would I need in making a indie game? And how many of each job position?[*]Which platform/s should I make my game for? I've heard PC would be the best choice for indie games, but what are the requirements to get on Xbox Live or Playstation Network? Is it difficult to get a game distributed for the aforementioned latter two platforms?[*]Have any of you ever built your own motion capture studio? I've seen videos where people use Microsoft Kinect's for mo cap work. Would this be a viable option or what options do I have?[*]Have any of you ever started an indie team, where you didn't pay the personnel working on your video game idea? Instead they treated it more like a hobby?[*]What recommendations would you give me as far as what game engine I should use to make a 3d fighting game? I was thinking something like either the Unreal Engine 3 or CryEngine 3 SDK's. Also, in the game I'd really like implement a feature of dynamic and progressively flowing blood on character models clothing and skin. Is there any engine that can make this possible?[/list] Thanks for the help and I'm all ears on any other advice you can give me.
  15. I see how it works now. Thanks for answering my questions larvantholos. [smile]