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Zionmoose

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  1.   Very interesting. I will keep that in mind.
  2.   I am looking for some suggestions/inspirations for the name of this character.   He is from Australia and the time frame is in the mid 22nd century, about 2130 or so. He is a blue-collar working type of guy; A bit rough around the edges but a family loving man. He works in a futuristic factory to provide for his kin. He will have one of the most essential roles in the story of our game, so his name is very important to us.   So if you are interested in helping us shape this character, feel free to drop a line and tell us what sort of name you think suits him. Thanks!  
  3.     Thank you for your feedback. I will definitely be coming back to the forums at a later time in development to get feedback on systems we already have implemented in the game. I was mainly here to spark up a conversation about the mechanics people enjoy in story rich games and to get an overall sense of what is fun for the majority. I realize we will not be able to please everyone with out game, but we would still like to make it great for a majority of folks.   Your little rant about what you liked about MGS4 compared to other games was specifically the kind of feedback I was looking for. Even by you just saying what you liked about 1 particular game helps me envision the things you thought were memorable about it, and that helps. 
  4.   You are absolutely correct, at least in my opinion, which is why I am here.   Our story is what we are really trying to tell. Some games want to let people build cities, some just want you to run around aimlessly and shoot things. Both of those types of games in their own right may not have any sort of story whatsoever. This is why we absolutely do realize that the core base we need to reach are people that just enjoy playing a game, not watching a movie. The story will be very rich and the dialog will be heavy, but how the players experiences it is currently under development.    I had originally come here to ask what mechanics you would want to see in a game that is rich with story and dialog(not text); stuff that you think would make the game "fun" to play.   Also, thanks for the tip about dissecting games. I knew it was probably going to throw some people off a bit with those references, but there were just some "general" ideas from each of the games that I wanted to relate to.
  5.   To answer you question, any subplots you may find along the way will more than likely be their own stories to promote the atmosphere of the game, and most will not affect the overall main story of the protagonist. I guess you could call them fillers...but not in the sense that they will be after thoughts; no, more in the sense that they are there to help promote the authenticity of what is happening even if it is not directly related to you.
  6. Deep story and linearity is not always a bad selling point. Lets look at Uncharted and MGS series. Both series offer you a very rich story that is full of exemplary character development, thus capturing its audience. At the same time, their core game is a very linear experience. This has not deterred people from investing in either one, as they are some of the best selling out there.    Now imagine though that you had such a grand story, but you didn't have that obviously linear path to walk down anymore. Your key objective is to just survive. How you survive is up to you. Let me put into perspective how it will work. The story itself is obviously a very linear entity in the entire package. No matter how the game is played, ultimately the players will all enjoy the same rich story that is passionately being created by our team. Imagine though, that the "main" story only progresses based on certain conditions. You will be in a deserted place trying to survive. You will encounter people that will allow you to engage in sub-plots that might not be related to your own story, but they will help build the atmosphere. Maybe an area you have been living in and gathering supplies from no longer bares any fruit. You only decide to move from that location because you can no longer fulfill your basic needs. Moving has always been extremely dangerous due to the nature of the apocalypse, but you have to do it. While you are trying to find another area to call home, you stumble upon an area that you decide to investigate. This investigation leads to a character dying and hence the story has moved forward. Had you not visited that location, that character would still be alive and you might experience another part of the "main" story that does not involve the character dying yet.    As you can see, we want the overall outcome to be the same for all of the players, because with a story so rich, having multiple outcomes is just not something we are striving for. At the same time though, how and when you progress through that story will largely be up to you.
  7.   Well that's just why I am here my friend. To see what you all felt was wrong with said game and find out what you would have liked to experience in such a grand story. Our goal is simply this; to deliver a powerful and emotional story but encapsulate it inside of fun, survival heavy gameplay. Where we will differ from Heavy Rain will simply be in the nature of the gameplay and control. Heavy Rain was almost front to back strictly focused on its intense story and, when you weren't pushing 40 buttons to fire up a coffee pot, you got an occasional pre-scripted action sequence.    Our game will be nothing like what is stated above except for the level of interaction with characters and their story. You will still play through scenes that are meant to help develop the story, scene like my machine shop example in my last post; and just like in that example, there will be integration into deeper systems then just talking. But on top of those elements, the gameplay will largely be an unscripted, AI driven survival game. You will have an inventory, you will have to study enemy patters, their will be stealth/action/suspense elements and ultimately you need to protect your loved ones at all costs.
  8. I guess one could say I left it intentionally vague.   To put things in perspective, let me list some of the overall key elements there will be in the game. Hopefully these will help you come up with ideas for features you would want when you played through the adventure.   There will be: -Deep conversational interaction between you and all important NPCs. (How important is it to you to have a branching cause and effect system as opposed to a thorough story driven conversation system?)   -Survival in deserted places, away from the "entities" that threaten humanity. (Would you want to see basic needs survival, and if so what would make it fun for you?)   -Logical Puzzle Solving that is integrated well into the story. (An instance of this might be the main protagonist at work having a discussion with his friend while tinkering on an engine together, then the main character stops conversation to finish the work and it cuts to you having to put the right bolts and wires in place)   -Action elements both passive and active. What I mean by this is the character is wholly unable to content with the "entities" that threaten life. So on many occasions the action will be passively activated by being caught and you must escape because it is the only option. Active action would be after you find a specific item that gives you at least some ability to take on the "entities", so you might stalk one of them. (Killing will not be as simple as running and gunning down enemies. Each kill is significant and is done for a purpose)   So based on just a few samples from above, I am interested to know "how" you would want to play the game. The story is by and large a huge deal in what will make this game great, but I don't want it to turn into Heavy Rain. What I mean by this is, while Heavy Rain was good, it wasn't always fun in the sense of action/suspense and control.   How would you want to play through a game where humanity's existence is all but hanging by a thread, and your only option is to survive and protect the ones you love at all costs?
  9.   Hello friends,    I am Shane Padgett and I am here to get opinions on game mechanics you would like to see in the first project being developed by Cryoshock Studios.   I have posted a rather lengthy topic already on the Unity forums to see what that particular community thought of our vision. You can see the original thread here: http://forum.unity3d.com/threads/172607-Would-You-Play-It-Criticism-Welcome   I am here because I wanted to step outside the confines of that community and tap into a broader audience. I come to seek the opinions, criticism and general knowledge from the gamedev community on our project.    I will provide a summary of what is in the article above so you have an understanding of our vision and the direction we wish to take this game.   In Short: I, as well as my team, feel that storytelling is becoming a lost art in game development. I am an avid gamer, and as such I have played my fair share of every genre. There are weekends I could spend just shooting with friends in COD matches and I have lost countless nights lately to PlanetSide 2. I have also played many strategy games, RPGs, 3rd person action/adventure games and so on.    Out of all the games however, the only ones that have made any sort of lasting impression on me were the ones that told a deep and meaningful story. Not every game needs to tell such grand tales as the MGS series; the COD style multiplayer is quite fun and doesn’t require it. To that end though, I regard games just in the same way I regard movies…entertainment. Like movies, games are going to have their “Sucker Punches” their “Transformers” and their “Wanted” titles. For me, just as those movies are visually appealing to watch and satisfy my entertainment need, I also need that “Lincoln” and “Slumdog Millionaire” experience to engage my mind and make me care about the people and settings. That being said, I feel largely that games have lost this touch. There are a few games with great stories, don’t get me wrong, but there are not nearly enough games with characters and a plot that I can care for. When playing a game, we invest much more time taking in the experience then we do with movies. This is why, to me, the story is the most important thing in a game.   Our project is to create a game that can tell a story and capture the audience in the same way “Heavy Rain” did, but also giving the player game mechanics which make the experience fun and much less mundane. Think of this as a cross between Heavy Rain, Resident Evil 4, and Fallout 3. These examples are used solely as a basis for certain mechanics they provided which, when combined, will create the total package that our team envisions. For instance, imagine you get the same story interaction that Heavy Rain provided, mixed with a control system like the new Resident Evils, tossed in with surviving following an apocalyptic event, but on a much more personal scale. You are a powerless human being, up against entities you stand no fighting chance against…and yet, you must survive.   So now that you have a rough idea of what we are trying to achieve, I would like to ask for your thoughts. I am looking for opinions and discussion that may help my studio shape how the game should be played. We have rough ideas about how controls and mechanics will work, but getting outside opinions on mechanics you would want to see in the final product will help us greatly.    So please, drop a line in this thread if you have questions or would like to spark up conversation about our project and I will be as thorough with explanations as I can.   Thanks from myself and the team!