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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Runesabre

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  1. Kickstarter update posted today! http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/enspiraonline/enspira-online/posts/574015
  2. There's some in-game videos posted:   Build Your  Island http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/enspiraonline/enspira-online/posts/570954   Player Homes http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/enspiraonline/enspira-online/posts/564773   Additional gameplay videos showing the adventures are in the works and will be posted next week
  3. Greetings!   I am Kirk Black and I've been a major contributor on great entertainment products over the past 20 years such as League of Legends, Ultima Online, Star Wars Galaxies and The Lord of the Rings Online to name a few.   I want to bring to your attention a new Non-Violent MMO I am developing called Enspira Online that has the Vision to bring Fun, Safe and Inspiring Entertainment to people all around the world to build a Global Community.   Please check out the Kickstarter for Enspira Online and consider backing this project.   http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/enspiraonline/enspira-online   There's already a community of 16,000 fans from around the world all waiting for the game to completed and released.  This can be achieved within a few weeks by reaching the target funding goal. https://www.facebook.com/EnspiraOnline   Thank you for your consideration and support!
  4. Greetings!   I am Kirk Black and I've been a major contributor on great entertainment products over the past 20 years such as League of Legends, Ultima Online, Star Wars Galaxies and The Lord of the Rings Online to name a few.   I want to bring to your attention a new Non-Violent MMO I am developing called Enspira Online that has the Vision to bring Fun, Safe and Inspiring Entertainment to people all around the world to build a Global Community.   Please check out the Kickstarter for Enspira Online and consider backing this project.   http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/enspiraonline/enspira-online   There's already a community of 16,000 fans from around the world all waiting for the game to completed and released.  This can be achieved within a few weeks by reaching the target funding goal. https://www.facebook.com/EnspiraOnline   Thank you for your consideration and support!
  5. I generally break my chunks/objects down into 3 basic categories: 1. Chunks that the client and server can generate identically with little to no shared information. (static chunks). 2. Chunks that are dynamic but don't tend to change much or at all once they are created at runtime. For instance, a terrain block that is created and never moves or changes state. 3. Chunks that are dynamic and change a lot (state info updates, position updates, etc). Player objects as an example. They change state a lot and move around a lot. Then I build a system that can tackle these three major areas.
  6. As a hiring manager, I can say that having a degree is not necessarily required, however you will have the burden of proof of showing your passion and capability for me to take a chance on you. I have hired and worked with some spectacularly talented individuals who did not have a college degree, but, they are few and far between and in all cases they exhibited exceptional and proven passion and capability whether it was in Art, Design, Production or Engineering.
  7. From a hiring manager's perspective, I have hired and been pleased with graduates from both Full Sail and Digipen.
  8. I had the Ultima Online servers running at 4 fps and SWG servers running at about 10 fps. League of Legends servers run as fast as they can in order to be as responsive as possible.
  9. If the world generation is deterministic, the first optimization is to have the server share the generation seed with the client and have client and server generate the base map identically. From that point, think about how often a "chunk" or "object changes. If you have a world where objects/chunks rarely change once generated, then you can leverage a hybrid update range system where the player has an update range established in which change objects will be sent and then "remembered" on the server so they don't ever need resent BUT can be updated to the player in the event that object or chunk happens to change (so when the player comes wandering back they see the updated chunk even if they were miles away when the chunk changed.). This means chunks have to know who knows about them in order to update all players accordingly. This optimizes the initial loading of dynamic chunks that changed from the base generation since players are only sent info about chunks as they first come across them. Assuming these chunks don't change often, then, you never have to send the info for that chunk again once it's sent the first time. If you have objects or chunks that change frequently, then you want to go with a standard update radius approach where dynamic objects are sent to the client when the player comes in range and then "forgotten" about when the player leaves range and resent when they come back in range. This strategy works well for objects that change a lot (like other players running around for instance) on large maps.
  10. If your interests are focused on doing more client-side development, I would go with C#. If your interests are more focused on doing more back-end server development, I would go with Java. If you go the Java route and really want to learn back-end development, then I suggest also getting dirty with Glassfish or JBoss and start absorbing Enterprise Java concepts.
  11. One prominent commercial MMO I worked on years ago had a similar save cycle as you described originally (saving data to files periodically). To avoid freezing the whole world (players and everything) in order to get a proper snapshot, you could consider forking the game processes at the time you would normally freeze the whole world to save and then have the forked processes save all the data per usual while the main game processes continue with the game. The game continues on while the original data states remain unchanged in the forked process. This solution does require more server memory (or an OS that only duplicates memory data when data needs changed from the original process), however, it preserves all the existing saving mechanisms with minimal changes to the overall MMO. At the very least it could serve as an interim solution while you reimplement the saving process to a database backend.