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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

khawk

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  1. I don't disagree, but some work will need to be done. While there is a setting to disable posting after so many days, there are some negative effects to doing this. Basically, some custom work needs to be done. Not impossible, just not a quick fix.
  2. I don't know why this happened other than there must be a bug with scheduling a publish date. Either way, I've made some changes but it might take a little time for the cache to update. I'll keep an eye on it. In the meantime, nice post - I set it to featured so at least it will show there.
  3. Jonathan Blow, designer for Braid and The Witness, has been live streaming his latest game engine development and posting the streams to Youtube. The latest streams cover the implementation of an improved animation system and animation control methods. Click here to view the full series or watch the embed below.
  4. Jonathan Blow, designer for Braid and The Witness, has been live streaming his latest game engine development and posting the streams to Youtube. The latest streams cover the implementation of an improved animation system and animation control methods. Click here to view the full series or watch the embed below. View full story
  5. We're approaching the time when reputation for all members will be re-indexed. As has previously been described, in our previous system reputation had a fuzzy definition. While a member could earn reputation through the usual up/downvotes, a member's activity could also generate reputation. For example, logging in on a daily basis would give you +1 reputation each login. Posting a blog, voting in the screenshot showdown, or posting an article would also generate reputation (at times +100!). But activity is not representative of how others in the community gauge your helpfulness, knowledge, or general contribution. In addition, the previous system does not match the new system where your reputation is only representative of your up/downvotes, which means the reputation still is not a representative value. To correct this, we will re-index the reputation for all members and remove all reputation points not earned through up/downvotes. Meaning, your reputation value will no longer include your site activity points, but it will include all of the up/downvotes you've received. A lot of members have a lot of reputation points, and in most cases the re-index will result in a severe drop in reputation value. So what about those reputation points based on activity? They have to be worth something, right? They are. All the activity reputation points will be converted into Pixels. We're finalizing how those points will be converted, but the current plan is for the conversion to align the activity with the Pixel awards in the new system. Site note: If you haven't figured it out yet, you earn Pixels through activity on the site. More activity through contributions to the community = more Pixels. We'll go into more about Pixels later. For now, I wanted to communicate this upcoming change and give the community an opportunity to provide feedback or ask questions.
  6. Develop:Brighton, announced record attendance figures with a 7.5 per cent year on year increase. The conference and expo which included sessions from industry visionaries including Brenda Romero, Graeme Devine, Tetsuya Mizuguchi and John Romero had 2,171 attendees over the three days, the most in its 12-year history. “I’d like to thank all our speakers, sponsors, exhibitors and attendees for making this year’s Develop:Brighton such a success,” commented Andy Lane, managing director of Tandem Events. “Each year we strive to improve and deliver an event that provides the game development community with the opportunity to learn, network and be inspired and we intend to continue on this journey.” Following the conclusion of Develop:Brighton, Tandem Events confirmed that Develop:VR, a one day conference and expo focused on the new commercial opportunities that Virtual and Augmented Reality present for today’s game developers, will return on Thursday 9 November at a new location, London’s Olympia. Tandem Events also announced Sony Interactive Entertainment will be a headline sponsor of Develop:VR. On the announcement of Develop:VR, Andy Lane commented, “We are delighted to announce the return of Develop:VR at its new home. Every day we’re learning more about what is possible with VR and AR technology. This is a fast growing sector both inside and outside the games industry and we believe Develop:VR is a destination for developers to learn from and network with those who are making waves in the space. I’d also like to thank Sony Interactive Entertainment for their support of the event as a headline sponsor.” Michael Denny, SVP WorldWide Studios, Sony Interactive Entertainment Europe, added, “Following on from the success of last year’s event, Develop VR promises to be an essential addition to the industry events calendar. As our PSVR ecosystem pushes at the boundaries of VR, with award winning experiences like the Joshua Bell immersive video project and exciting new games like Farpoint, having an event like this is vital to spread ideas, knowledge and best practice to ensure that, across the creative industries, we can truly deliver on the exceptional promise of VR to our consumers.” Speaker Submissions is now open for Develop:VR 2017 and prospective speakers have until 23 August to submit proposals at http://www.developconference.com/conference/vr-call- for-speaker- submissions.
  7. Develop:Brighton, announced record attendance figures with a 7.5 per cent year on year increase. The conference and expo which included sessions from industry visionaries including Brenda Romero, Graeme Devine, Tetsuya Mizuguchi and John Romero had 2,171 attendees over the three days, the most in its 12-year history. “I’d like to thank all our speakers, sponsors, exhibitors and attendees for making this year’s Develop:Brighton such a success,” commented Andy Lane, managing director of Tandem Events. “Each year we strive to improve and deliver an event that provides the game development community with the opportunity to learn, network and be inspired and we intend to continue on this journey.” Following the conclusion of Develop:Brighton, Tandem Events confirmed that Develop:VR, a one day conference and expo focused on the new commercial opportunities that Virtual and Augmented Reality present for today’s game developers, will return on Thursday 9 November at a new location, London’s Olympia. Tandem Events also announced Sony Interactive Entertainment will be a headline sponsor of Develop:VR. On the announcement of Develop:VR, Andy Lane commented, “We are delighted to announce the return of Develop:VR at its new home. Every day we’re learning more about what is possible with VR and AR technology. This is a fast growing sector both inside and outside the games industry and we believe Develop:VR is a destination for developers to learn from and network with those who are making waves in the space. I’d also like to thank Sony Interactive Entertainment for their support of the event as a headline sponsor.” Michael Denny, SVP WorldWide Studios, Sony Interactive Entertainment Europe, added, “Following on from the success of last year’s event, Develop VR promises to be an essential addition to the industry events calendar. As our PSVR ecosystem pushes at the boundaries of VR, with award winning experiences like the Joshua Bell immersive video project and exciting new games like Farpoint, having an event like this is vital to spread ideas, knowledge and best practice to ensure that, across the creative industries, we can truly deliver on the exceptional promise of VR to our consumers.” Speaker Submissions is now open for Develop:VR 2017 and prospective speakers have until 23 August to submit proposals at http://www.developconference.com/conference/vr-call- for-speaker- submissions. View full story
  8. Epic Games has announced that the 2017 Unreal Engine Marketplace Summer Sale is officially underway and runs from July 18 to August 1. Over 1,200 items are available at discounts up to 90% off. Blueprints, textures, music, and more are all available. From the blog: In case you hadn't heard yet, GameDev.net's own GameDev Marketplace also has a summer sale. Until August 31, get 50% off all GameDev Marketplace assets using the code gdnetsummer2017. Browse, buy, and sell at https://gamedev.market.
  9. Epic Games has announced that the 2017 Unreal Engine Marketplace Summer Sale is officially underway and runs from July 18 to August 1. Over 1,200 items are available at discounts up to 90% off. Blueprints, textures, music, and more are all available. From the blog: In case you hadn't heard yet, GameDev.net's own GameDev Marketplace also has a summer sale. Until August 31, get 50% off all GameDev Marketplace assets using the code gdnetsummer2017. Browse, buy, and sell at https://gamedev.market. View full story
  10. Nearly 5,000 developers and tech professionals across the world responded to Packt’s third annual Skill Up survey to share their thoughts on the latest tech tools and trends, and how they work and learn. Skill Up 2017 also investigated wider questions about the tech industry - from its status and value in organizations and industry today, through to urgent issues around diversity. The aim of Packt’s Skill Up survey is to help those working in tech make better decisions about the tools they decide to use, how they use them, and how they learn about them, in order to stay relevant and gain a competitive edge in their careers. Download the full Skill Up report to discover what it’s like to work in tech today. Who took part in Skill Up 2017? Skill Up was circulated globally to people working across an array of sectors in tech; from mobile developers to big data engineers, and everyone in between. 4,731 respondents from 43 countries around the world took part. The majority of responses came from men aged between 35 and 45 working full-time in software solutions in the United States. A full breakdown of this year’s demographics can be found in the full Skill Up report. Skill Up at a glance And the number one tool is… Python. Its popularity has surged over recent years and it has clearly gained huge mainstream uptake due to its accessibility, fully featured standard library, rich ecosystem of libraries and frameworks, and highly engaged community. Joining Python in the top 5 are Git, Visual Studio, Eclipse, and Java. Discover who’s using Python and the tools they’re most likely to use with it in Skill Up. What should people be learning next? Python’s popularity won’t be waning any time soon – it came in at second place as the tool to learn over the next 12 months. Python was pipped to pole position by Docker. With the growth of containerization, a surge in people learning Docker makes sense. Angular, Visual Studio, and Jenkins also make the top 5. Take a look at Skill Up to explore who will be learning what over the next 12 months. Why learn something new? ‘There is a problem that I need to fix and don't know how’ is the number one reason why developers and tech professionals choose to learn something new. They also cite solving problems more effectively at work, and curiosity about tools and languages they’ve read about online as reasons to get learning. 18-34 year olds are most likely to learn something new in order to expand their skillset and apply for a new role. Despite this career focus, they are the most likely to say they are not motivated to learn. The over 45s are very practical about their learning, saying that a new update or change to a language or tool they work with spurs them on to learn. Whilst they have the motivation to learn, they find that lack of time is their biggest barrier. Skill Up also revealed that 18-34 year olds are big Stack Overflow fans, whilst the over 45s are into their reading. Packt is committed to learning to suit everyone; offering eBooks, print books, videos, blogs, and an online learning platform, Mapt. Discover more about how those working in tech are learning in the full Skill Up report. The skills that pay the bills The big question – who’s earning the most? The top five roles to be in for ultimate earning power are C-Suite Level Managers, Big Data Engineers, Mid-level Leads/Managers, Security Engineers, and Information Architects. Unsurprisingly, developers and tech professionals in North America have the highest average salary, whilst those in South and South-East Asia are worst off. As for the lowest paid roles, hobbyists came out on top, yet we can assume respondents identifying as hobbyists do not work full-time in a tech role. In terms of full-time professions, Game Developers had the lowest average salary, followed by Web Developers, Technical Support Professionals, and Mobile Developers. So what do you need to learn to earn? Respondents with Splunk, Hadoop, Kafka, Chef, or SAS under their belt earn more than the average salary. It seems as though Big Data is the industry to be in. Does the tech industry have a gender diversity problem? 90% of respondents to Skill Up were male, which in itself reveals the industry’s lack of gender diversity. Packt asked respondents if they thought the tech industry does have a gender diversity issue, and a majority of 47.2% agreed. 24.3% didn’t think there was an issue, whilst 28.5% were sat on the fence. The biggest gap between gender equality appeared in the Financial Services and Software Solutions sectors, whilst Design and Marketing came out on top for diversity. It may come as no surprise that 18-24 year old males were the least likely to agree there is a gender diversity issue. Perhaps a rose-tinted view stemming from a lack of industry experience? The full Skill Up 2017 survey report is free and available for download here.
  11. Nearly 5,000 developers and tech professionals across the world responded to Packt’s third annual Skill Up survey to share their thoughts on the latest tech tools and trends, and how they work and learn. Skill Up 2017 also investigated wider questions about the tech industry - from its status and value in organizations and industry today, through to urgent issues around diversity. The aim of Packt’s Skill Up survey is to help those working in tech make better decisions about the tools they decide to use, how they use them, and how they learn about them, in order to stay relevant and gain a competitive edge in their careers. Download the full Skill Up report to discover what it’s like to work in tech today. Who took part in Skill Up 2017? Skill Up was circulated globally to people working across an array of sectors in tech; from mobile developers to big data engineers, and everyone in between. 4,731 respondents from 43 countries around the world took part. The majority of responses came from men aged between 35 and 45 working full-time in software solutions in the United States. A full breakdown of this year’s demographics can be found in the full Skill Up report. Skill Up at a glance And the number one tool is… Python. Its popularity has surged over recent years and it has clearly gained huge mainstream uptake due to its accessibility, fully featured standard library, rich ecosystem of libraries and frameworks, and highly engaged community. Joining Python in the top 5 are Git, Visual Studio, Eclipse, and Java. Discover who’s using Python and the tools they’re most likely to use with it in Skill Up. What should people be learning next? Python’s popularity won’t be waning any time soon – it came in at second place as the tool to learn over the next 12 months. Python was pipped to pole position by Docker. With the growth of containerization, a surge in people learning Docker makes sense. Angular, Visual Studio, and Jenkins also make the top 5. Take a look at Skill Up to explore who will be learning what over the next 12 months. Why learn something new? ‘There is a problem that I need to fix and don't know how’ is the number one reason why developers and tech professionals choose to learn something new. They also cite solving problems more effectively at work, and curiosity about tools and languages they’ve read about online as reasons to get learning. 18-34 year olds are most likely to learn something new in order to expand their skillset and apply for a new role. Despite this career focus, they are the most likely to say they are not motivated to learn. The over 45s are very practical about their learning, saying that a new update or change to a language or tool they work with spurs them on to learn. Whilst they have the motivation to learn, they find that lack of time is their biggest barrier. Skill Up also revealed that 18-34 year olds are big Stack Overflow fans, whilst the over 45s are into their reading. Packt is committed to learning to suit everyone; offering eBooks, print books, videos, blogs, and an online learning platform, Mapt. Discover more about how those working in tech are learning in the full Skill Up report. The skills that pay the bills The big question – who’s earning the most? The top five roles to be in for ultimate earning power are C-Suite Level Managers, Big Data Engineers, Mid-level Leads/Managers, Security Engineers, and Information Architects. Unsurprisingly, developers and tech professionals in North America have the highest average salary, whilst those in South and South-East Asia are worst off. As for the lowest paid roles, hobbyists came out on top, yet we can assume respondents identifying as hobbyists do not work full-time in a tech role. In terms of full-time professions, Game Developers had the lowest average salary, followed by Web Developers, Technical Support Professionals, and Mobile Developers. So what do you need to learn to earn? Respondents with Splunk, Hadoop, Kafka, Chef, or SAS under their belt earn more than the average salary. It seems as though Big Data is the industry to be in. Does the tech industry have a gender diversity problem? 90% of respondents to Skill Up were male, which in itself reveals the industry’s lack of gender diversity. Packt asked respondents if they thought the tech industry does have a gender diversity issue, and a majority of 47.2% agreed. 24.3% didn’t think there was an issue, whilst 28.5% were sat on the fence. The biggest gap between gender equality appeared in the Financial Services and Software Solutions sectors, whilst Design and Marketing came out on top for diversity. It may come as no surprise that 18-24 year old males were the least likely to agree there is a gender diversity issue. Perhaps a rose-tinted view stemming from a lack of industry experience? The full Skill Up 2017 survey report is free and available for download here. View full story
  12. GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a new ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
  13. GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a new ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here. View full story
  14. Babylon.js v3.0 has been released. The open source framework allows developers to create 3D experiences in the browser. The release includes: Support for WebGL 2 with more control over the GPU Support for WebVR 1.1 including support for the new Windows Mixed Reality headsets Support for glTF 2.0 including physically based rendering materials Improved physically based rendering (demo) New Babylon.GUI for generating an interactive user interface Support for morph targets Support for live textures using WebCam Documentation improvements and the Playground, where developers can experiment with a live code editor Learn more from the announcement on the Windows blog.
  15. Babylon.js v3.0 has been released. The open source framework allows developers to create 3D experiences in the browser. The release includes: Support for WebGL 2 with more control over the GPU Support for WebVR 1.1 including support for the new Windows Mixed Reality headsets Support for glTF 2.0 including physically based rendering materials Improved physically based rendering (demo) New Babylon.GUI for generating an interactive user interface Support for morph targets Support for live textures using WebCam Documentation improvements and the Playground, where developers can experiment with a live code editor Learn more from the announcement on the Windows blog. View full story