Novacurse

Member
  • Content count

    6
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

116 Neutral

About Novacurse

  • Rank
    Newbie
  1. RAGE skybox?

    Clearly you didn't even read my post [size="2"][color="#1c2837"]something like Terragen can be used to easily make realistic skyboxes [/color][/size][color=#1C2837][size=2][url="http://www.planetside.co.uk/"]http://www.planetside.co.uk/[/url] and as far as I know requires no artistic talent... other then that if you have no artistic talent what you'll want to look for is something that can render atmospheres/clouds etc, [/size][/color] [color=#1C2837][size=2]I'm not sure what capabilities the major 3D modelling/rendering applications have in this regard but you can probably look into them - 3ds Max ([url="http://usa.autodesk.com/3ds-max/"]http://usa.autodesk.com/3ds-max/[/url]) (not free) - Maya ([url="http://usa.autodesk.com/maya/"]http://usa.autodesk.com/maya/[/url]) (not free) - Blender ([url="http://www.blender.org/"]http://www.blender.org/[/url]) (free) (I'm assuming all you want is information on getting a rendered atmosphere type image based on your second post)[/size][/color]
  2. RAGE skybox?

    Personally i felt like Halo 3 had some of the most beautiful skyboxes i've ever seen. calling the skyboxes in it "Disgusting, unfitting, unatmospheric, unprofessional, unrealistic" is completely unfounded. Anyway, to answer your question, i honestly wouldn't be able to say, there's so many different ways that they could do it, most of them however i would think would require alot of artistic talent. Now in saying that i think your best bet if you want some nice easy skyboxes is to look into something like Terragen (http://www.planetside.co.uk/).
  3. As far as I know, the .w3g format is actually a replay file for Warcraft 3. w3x and .w3m are the map formats for warcraft 3. As for the interview question, if i had to guess the interviewer wanted to know why a file containing the entire replay of a game would be so small, maybe that's a bit too obvious so I may be wrong, but that'd be my best guess. Hope this info helps.
  4. Projectiles

    Hey I would probably go with using vectors. I don't know if it's the best solution or the worst but i know it works, so i will try to explain it as best i can [rolleyes] #include <vector> #include <iostream> using namespace std; vector<int> My_Vector; int Counter; int main() { while(true) { //This will add a new int to the vector My_Vector.push_back(Counter); for(int a = 0; a<My_Vector.size();a++) { //The vector can then be accessed similarly to an array //You can also access it by using My_Vector.at(index) //I'm not clear on the difference cout<<My_Vector[a]; }; cout<<"\n"; Counter++; system("Pause"); }; }; So the above example shows how to use a vector it's not particularly useful but it's simple, Basically we declare a vector on this line 'std::vector<type> name' and then on this line add a new object with the .push_back(object) function. 'My_Vector.push_back(Counter);' i see no reason why a structure would not work as the type, but i've never tried too so i may be wrong, i know that Classes work and will show how to use them with vectors in the next example. #include <vector> #include <iostream> using namespace std; void Add_Animal(); class Animal { public: void eat(); void sleep(); double weight; double height; }; vector<Animal> My_Vector; int main() { while(true) { Add_Animal(); Add_Animal(); for(int a = 0;a<My_Vector.size();a++) { My_Vector[a].eat(); My_Vector[a].weight = My_Vector[a].weight + 1; }; system("Pause"); }; }; void Add_Animal() { Animal Temp; Temp.height = 100; Temp.weight = 100; My_Vector.push_back(Temp); }; void Animal::eat() { cout<<"\n"<<"Animal Eating!"; }; void Animal::sleep() { cout<<"\n"<<"Animal Sleeping!"; }; Ofcourse you'll probably also like to know how to delete an object, this next example shows how to using basically the same code as above. Note : the vector system will automatically move the other entries back if you delete an entry in the middle. #include <vector> #include <iostream> using namespace std; void Add_Animal(); void Delete_Animal(int index); class Animal { public: void eat(); void sleep(); double weight; double height; }; vector<Animal> My_Vector; int main() { while(true) { Add_Animal(); Add_Animal(); for(int a = 0;a<My_Vector.size();a++) { My_Vector[a].eat(); My_Vector[a].weight = My_Vector[a].weight + 1; }; Delete_Animal(1); system("Pause"); }; }; void Add_Animal() { Animal Temp; Temp.height = 100; Temp.weight = 100; My_Vector.push_back(Temp); }; void Delete_Animal(int index) { My_Vector.erase(My_Vector.begin() + index); }; void Animal::eat() { cout<<"\n"<<"Animal Eating!"; }; void Animal::sleep() { cout<<"\n"<<"Animal Sleeping!"; }; Ok i hope this helped you and for your other question yes vectors can be passed as a parameter to a function if you need an example just ask, if you have any other questions i'll be happy to answer them aswell. and if you need some more info Here PS : i've probably made alot of mistakes in my code as i haven't been programming for that long.