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UziMonkey

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  1. 2 megs of video memory won't even hold a 1024x768 framebuffer. I seriously doubt it only has 2 megs with a CPU that fast. My first pc had 2 megs of VRAM... in 1997 or so.
  2. Offset is not a static function. It's a member function. It would make no sense at all as a static function. Quote: I know that you can't call a static anything from a non-static anything You can. Static member functions are just functions that are part of the class, but not part of any objects. They're still in the same namespace as the member functions, but obviously don't have access to any member variables or functions. You can still call static member functions from a member function. Quote: Would it even be appropriate to declare my sprite object as static Probably not. If you had more than one animation, they'd be fighting over the same IntRect instance. Quote: Is IntRect::Offset just a method, or is it a distinct object? It's just a member function. You use it like this. sf::IntRect i; i.Offset(10, 10);
  3. Most people will ignore you if you have nothing to show. There are tons of "I'm making this super-awesome game!" people out there that have nothing to show, and will never have anything to show because the give up once they realize it takes a lot of work. So you're probably not going to get anyone interested unless you something to show. Or money.
  4. The second level looks a lot better, especially if there's movement and parallax scrolling as you're fighting over the train cars. The first level wasn't great. As I commented on your youtube channel, it's just kind of flat. It could really use a backdrop and some color. But keep going, I'd love to see the second level in action.
  5. You're probably going to get sued, or at least get a nasty letter from the NBC lawyers. It needs to have (at the very least) a different name, a different logo (it can't look just like the Deal or No Deal logo, even if it's a different name), different overall look and feel, different names for things, etc. They can't stop you from making a clone, but a clone masquerading as the original is another story.
  6. I'm not sure what FLAC package that is, but does it have the header and static libs, or is it just a DLL? At any rate, you need to make configure see these directories. Usually, that'll be done with something like "./configure --with-flac=/c/Dev/flac-1.2.1".
  7. I've been working on this game for about a week now. This is a clone of Missile Command, written in Ruby using the Gosu library. Here's a screenshot. Here's a video. Here's a download for Windows. You can run it on Linux and OS X as well, so if anyone wants to, I'll write some directions on how to get it working. This download is version 0.2. Everything is implemented, but the gameplay is unbalanced. After some play testing, I have to go back and make the levels get harder in a meaningful way. The next version (0.3, or possibly 1.0) will have balanced gameplay and high score screens (possibly online high scores). Most of the art is borrowed (with permission) from others. The UFO/lampshade I did myself, anyone want to replace it? Sounds are generated using SFXR.
  8. I've tried to make games many times in the past, but I have a problem: I see windmills as giants. I suspect many people here have this problem. When you see every windmill as a giant, it's hard not to get lost fighting giants and forget the task at hand. So, my finished game. I decided to use XNA, so I gave myself a crash course in C# and XNA. I don't know all of what XNA has to offer yet, so it's not using all the features. The game is nothing spectacular. It was finished mostly in a single sitting, so it's nothing terribly elaborate either. Also, most of the content was ripped from other things, so I didn't spend much time on that. Haggar goes to the beach only to find it's raining golden rings! Make Haggar catch as many rings as possible in 1 minute. Haggar was ripped from Final Fight (arcade version). The rings are from a Sonic game (not sure which one). The background is from a random google image search. The music is a chiptune from HSVC, most likely a Rob Hubbard tune. The sound effects I made myself. You can download the game here. I'm particularly interested to know if this installer works on your computers, and which OS you're running. Comments about the game itself are welcome as well, but as this is just a simple game to test XNA out I didn't give much attention to the game itself.
  9. The actual flash memory chips will probably be the same anyway. These are also (usually) cheap almost throwaway devices, so if you find a bad brand just don't buy from them anymore.
  10. Sessions are stored server-side so no, they can't.
  11. Logging into the database server can often take more time than the actual query (depending on the load and conditions). To keep HTTP response times down, keeping a pool of open queries is a common technique. A process that's handling a page render grabs an open connection, queries the database for some data, renders the page, spits it back at the user and returns the connection to the pool.
  12. OpenGL

    SDL_GL_SwapBuffers should do that for you. I can't really tell what's wrong with your code, can you post a small program that replicates it? Often in writing the smaller, more simple program you see what's wrong. Perhaps the problem is with the OpenGL calls. I'd call glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW) before glLoadIdentity just in case. If you never called glMatrixMode after setting up your projection matrix, you can often see something the first frame then nothing in later frames. Oh, and when posting code, put the code in source tag, like this (but without that spaces in the tags): [ source ] code goes here [ /source ]
  13. I often have a number of predicates for passing the STL algorithms as static functions in my classes. Example: class Foo { bool m_alive; public: static bool is_alive( const Foo& f ) { return f.m_alive; } }; ... erase( remove_if( c.begin(), c.end(), Foo::is_valid ), c.end() ); Also useful for sorting and most of the other algorithms. Of course you could just use boost::lambda as well.
  14. I use boost::format for this. It uses string streams internally so it's type-safe and can insert anything with operator<< into a string. You're going to have a lot of trouble using vsprintf. Type safety is a big issue, there's just no way to know the type of the variables on the stack. You can easily overflow that buffer array. It also can't print any types other than the native types. The boost::format library is far, far superior. Edit: Missed the thing about not being able to use streams. If there's no streams, there's no type safety, so things get boring and tricky really fast. You should at least be using vsnprintf. That way you can tell if you filled the buffer before all characters were written (compare its return value to the length of your buffer). On a side note, why can't you just fprintf to the log file? Why do you even need to form the string in the first place? It just seems like an unnecessary step.
  15. This is just completely awesome.