• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

stupid_programmer

Members
  • Content count

    602
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

2378 Excellent

About stupid_programmer

  • Rank
    Advanced Member
  1. Make whatever kind of game interests you. If you are going about this as some kind of checklist of things to try and get a job it will come through on what you make. They probably aren't looking for anything specific other then you have some kind of passion for games and that you can write clean, easy to follow code. If you make something that interests you then it will come through. Making a Tetris clone probably isn't enough but it isn't like you have to write you own complete game engine from scratch either.
  2. The bonus of paying top dollar for premium parts is that they just don't die very often. And Apple always replaces them when they do - if you are dropping $5k, shell out the extra for the 3 year warranty.     That kind of misses the point of the disadvantage of an all-in-one lack of modularity. I've only ever had two monitors die on me so far after decades of computer use. The old 14" CRT I had with my first computer popped and wouldn't turn on anymore after a decade or so of use, and then a Dell LCD screen (Which took a tumble when someone tripped and knocked into it.) In both cases it was easy enough to swap things out with other hardware on hand or otherwise ignore the loss and continue using the rest of the computer without any real negative impact. Having Apple be happy to fix a dead backlight or cracked screen (Something I've seen in several iMacs over the years) is all well and good, but it still means the entire computer goes out the door and can't be used.  I would still prefer if Apple was offering a hardware lineup that meant that I could pull an old monitor out of the closet, or just continue on with one less screen for a few days, while they fixed the problem. Why shell out top dollar for a system that is inflexible and hard to work around individual issues when you could shell out top dollar for parts in a modular system that have the same low odds of failure?      You describe every Windows laptop and Android tablet ever made too.  Doesn't seem to stop people buying millions of those.  And it isn't like the all in one form factor is an Apple only thing.  Quite a few Windows machines do the same thing as an iMac.  Besides iMacs do support external monitors, hard drives and other peripherals.  Unless the motherboard goes out it isn't like a failed component on an iMac reduces it to doorstop status until it can be fixed by Apple. We have a Mac mini at work that has been on non stop for the past four years and still seems to be as snappy as when it was new.  We regularly update it too, currently runs Sierra so that it can use Xcode 8 for builds.  Failure rate on our Windows hardware has been far, far greater. I've become partial to Apple because a Macbook has been my primary work computer for many years now.  But $5k for a base workstation is a bit on the extreme side.
  3. There do seem to be a few genuine random picks for a feature but as Hodgman said, it is generally by "who you know".  Even then they still want one sheets before even thinking about it.  Doesn't help you any but it seems to be much easier to get featured by Apple.
  4. I'm intrigued by what you mean by the first one of these? The second... well, if you are talking C# scripts, then you can debug stuff from Visual Studio (with the Unity Tools plugin) or one of the OSX Mono environments easy enough.. in fact, using the Unity Tools plugin I think you can debug C# code with VSCode..?     I can see how it could be hard to follow the control flow if your project wasn't setup well.  Dozens (hundreds?) of random scripts on random objects in maybe several random scenes.  A lot of times there is no real way to tell how one game object relates to another. As far as debugging, I still don't think it is clearly spelled out you can attach the Visual Studio debugger to Unity and be able to inspect everything at run time.  Even then you have to leave Unity, attach the debugger, then go back to Unity and start the scene.  While not a pain it does break your flow. We use Unity at work so I am fairly biased towards it.  We do social and mobile games and Unity seems to support them much better then Unreal does.  Our designers seem to be able to wrap their heads around the Unity workflow pretty easy so that is another reason we don't look to switch.  Most of our tools are run inside of Unity so that designers tweak and go as they please.  If we were a larger studio and could afford to just outright buy an Unreal license we might consider the switch (but there is still that mobile aspect and retraining designers).  But as was pointed out earlier, Unity is cheaper in the long run and we aren't pushing any hardware limits.
  5.   That is where you are wrong though I think.  Those few top tier people will be in a way footing the bill for the rest of the jobless masses.  Most will not do that out of the goodness of their hearts.  They will want some kind of special compensation for their efforts.  No matter what kind of political system this new world has there will be ruling elite who want better things then the few people who still work get.  There is going to be a divide between the have and the have-nots.  While the have-nots will have a much better life then your average communist country everybody will not be equal.  When things aren't equal then there is friction and friction ends up catching fire.  But at this point in time people are so completely dependent on the system they created there is nothing to do but eat their daily Soylent Green rations and make more pots nobody cares about because billions of other people are making the same generic pot.   While UBI is probably the future as more and more things become automated.  I really have my doubts it will be a Star Trek utopia that everybody wants it to be.  I see it being more like a world wide communist Russia.  You just have to take a look through Facebook comments and anything remotely political.  People aren't interested in working together.  They are more interested in forcing everybody else to think like them.  Now you are going to have billions of people who have nothing but free time.  Maybe if the process is slow enough people's attitudes will change but good luck getting people to support the huge "welfare state" during the transition and not to mention that in 100,000 years of history large groups of humans generally don't coexist very well.
  6.   Sadly features don't really even guarantee your game will get traction.  Yes, you will get downloads but unless the game has some kind of hook those users won't stick around for very long.   £100 on Facebook ads won't get you much of anything.  Anymore it isn't uncommon to start spending several dollars per user if you are in a popular genre.  You should try and target iOS if possible.  Android generally has many more people who will play your game but iOS users tend to want to spend more.  If you are really serious about this then you should just try and pick up a used Mac mini.  As no matter what language your game is in you are going to need some dev time to get it fully working for iOS.   The days of the quick Flappy Bird flash in the pan success are quickly becoming a thing of the past.  Multi million dollar advertising campaigns (ie Mobile Strike) are unfortunately starting to become a common thing.
  7.   Ok so I looked up into it....so this applies to even companies like Nintendo?   Also, why isn't the government doing anything about it?     The idea is ingrained throughout Japanese culture.  Part of the whole "pursuit of perfection" that came out of their history.  Japanese culture isn't taught to rock the boat and speak out so everybody does it whether they like it or not.  Government won't do anything about it when they do it themselves.  South Korea is probably just as bad but they work crazy hours for other reasons.
  8. Hello, is the 15" new macbook pro with 256GB SSD could run the VM well? is it fine with that disk space? because i can only afford this macbook. Thankyou.     The 15" should work (I have the 512GB version) but you may find that you will be running out of disk space.  Even though Windows is running as a VM it still needs to be fully installed and Windows has gotten quite fat.  Good thing though is if you use the Confluence mode in Parallels Windows programs open seamlessly in OSX and have no problems reading/writing files from the Mac drive so you don't have to have duplicates of all your files.   If you don't really need a Macbook then you shouldn't spend the money on one.  I have a Macbook because I have to do iOS development but Unity works much better in Windows and Visual Studio is much superior to MonoDevelop so a Macbook with Windows VM is a good (but stupidly expensive) comprise.  Worked paid for mine, no way I'd spend almost $3k for a laptop.  If your course work is light to none on actual programming then a Windows machine would probably do you much better.
  9. Macbook is my primary machine at work.  I also run Parallels so I always have Windows running in a VM that is fully integrated into the Mac OS.  But the base Macbook won't cut it as your system will always be bogged down.  Really need at least 16 gigs of RAM so you can give Windows eight or it will always be paging memory.  Really though, the boot time of OSX and Windows is pretty short on a SSD so just going the Boot Camp route and restarting as needed is probably the better solution for a designer.
  10. While I like working from home.  So much more work is done when you are in the office.  I'm the tech manager at work and there is no way I could effectively do my job while being remote.  Instead of having an office I have a desk in the pit with the rest of the programmers.  We talk to one another constantly through out the day about the task at hand or if somebody is having trouble figuring something out anybody who wants to add input can get together and hash it out.  I'm fairly introverted at work so it isn't like I really enjoy all the talking but it is part of the job.  Programmers have some design leeway so if they think a feature is going to have some problems down the road they can talk to the designer and see about fixing it.  There have been many bugs at work that have been squashed because QA could just show us how they broke the game instead of trying to write a super detailed report.  While we could video chat all of this not everybody keeps a close watch on their Skype chat so the other person could be waiting a while to get a simple answer.  Not to mention trying to get five or six remote people together for a spontaneous discussion isn't exactly easy.   Remote can be fine if you are working on mature software that pretty much is set in stone the path it will take as there isn't a lot of room for interpretation on how things should go.  But if you are working on new evolving tech you can't really beat taking somebody over to a whiteboard and quickly laying out your design and letting them show you everything that is wrong with it.
  11. We recently ported one of our mobile games to Steam to test the waters.  It isn't a license to print money but it is certainly paying for the effort it took to port to PC/Mac.  Our niche isn't overpopulated with paid versions so there isn't a bunch of competition for us.  raccoonv mentioned Brawlhalla, which does seem to be doing pretty well for itself as PC doesn't have a lot of multiplayer beat-em-ups.  I would definitely say away from the currently hot paid genres like shooters and MOBAs (probably not survival MMO either) just so you don't get swallowed up.
  12. Sounds like every person in the world is a programmer, the way you say it     It definitely has become a popular major as of late as a lot of people see it as a easy way to make a lot of money.  The thing is a lot of those people aren't very good and have flooded the market making it hard to find the people who can actually do the job.  The rise of tools like Unity hasn't helped as now a lot of people who figured out how to make a cube move now think they are programmers and are looking for jobs.  Employers need an easy way to filter the hundred of applications they get for a position.  For entry level jobs, not having a degree is a good place to start.  It sucks and has led to a lot of qualified people not getting a job but that is the way it goes.  You need to do everything in your power to rise above the cruft and stand out to the HR drones.   It was already mentioned, but if school is this easy for you then you should have lots of time to work on your own projects.  Having a great portfolio is also important to getting a job.  Or maybe you have a great game idea and can turn it in to your own company.  The fact that you have a couple of years to live free of any real responsibility will never happen again.  The bit of debt you have to take on to get a degree is greatly offset by the larger income potential you are going to have by getting a degree.
  13. We used to do social games in Flash (still supporting a few current ones) and let me tell you that it is a good thing it is quickly going away.  It has so many issues and security problems.  Adobe seems to have never cared to fix the core issues with the platform but still kept on pushing updates with new features that I don't think many people cared about.  We get so many client problems that we can never really repo as it just seems to be a combination of Flash and the users computer.  Not that HTML5 is a great replacement at this point but it is getting better.   AIR on the other hand isn't a bad platform.  Combined with Starling you can get some pretty decent performance.  With Android you can get rid of the "air." prefix Adobe tries to slap on your package name so players don't even know they are playing a Flash game.  But as usual Adobe always lags behind on platform support.  New versions of iOS and Xcode are always a problem.  Not until almost a year after iOS 10 beta SDK has been out has AIR been able to target iOS 10 as the base SDK.  It worked before but there were some workarounds and probably resigning your app to get it to submit.  AIR does have legitimate desktop support as well.  So it is very possible to have the same game run on web, mobile, and desktop with no code changes.  Not a lot of frameworks can say that.   If you are just starting out and don't really know what you want to do yet and ActionScript seems interesting to you then go ahead and start making games with it.  Flash and AIR are still going to be around for quite a long time in the indie scene.  But if you want to make a job out of this there are better tools to start with that are actually going to be used in the industry for years to come.
  14. I mean like it's more like choose the guy who's completely and utterly nuts or choose any of the other three guys who haven't said radically stupid things. What Trump supporters are incapable of seeing is just how stupid Trump is and how much of an impact that stupidity can have at a Presidential level.     Just like Clinton supporters are incapable of seeing is just how corrupt and self serving Clinton is and how much of an impact that corruption can have at a Presidential level.   Trump is an idiot, but it is very funny that liberals can spout off all day how much Trump hurt their feelings but be so oblivious to the fact Clinton doesn't care about them and this whole thing is just a bid to get more power.
  15. If the freelance work was paid then you could put it on your resume.  But even if paid, if the game(s) never got released or if your friends didn't have some kind of registered company then it gets kind of sticky as to whether or not it is 'professional' work to be put on a resume.  Either way that work can go to your portfolio.  To a recent graduate your portfolio is more important anyway.  Companies know that graduates have little to any real world experience so they look to see what kind of work you have done in your portfolio.    Lots of graduates get jobs in the industry with no previous experience.  So don't worry too much about it.  Just make sure that your portfolio is strong and that your basic skills are sharp.  It can be a multi month process to get a job in the industry so don't fret too much if you don't have something lined up quickly.  Keep applying to other places and use the free time to improve your skills.