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DrjonesDW3d

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About DrjonesDW3d

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  1. DrjonesDW3d

    Which Vista Type should I buy?

    Quote:Original post by Kazade Also, DX10 not being backported to XP is surely just Microsoft trying to force people to upgrade? Is there a technical reason why the DX10 cant be ported to XP? I cant see why there would be if you have DX10 capable hardware. It amazes me how people are such closed minded. There has been such a hate of Microsoft that instantly as soon as any decision is made by them people instantly draw the conclusion that it is to screw over them to make more money. I'm not saying that every decision they make is justified in a way other than that, but come on, do some research. With Windows Vista Microsoft developed a new driver model. That isn't a small thing. That is HUGE. One of an OSes main jobs is to talk to the hardware. They redesigned how that communication takes place. DX10 uses that new system. DX10 is not compatible with the Windows XP driver model. If they were going to make it so you could run DX10 on vista, you would basically be turning XP into Vista. New technology is good. There is usually a lot of thought that goes into making it better than what it is replacing. It's much nicer using something like .NET over MFC. A lot of times, that new technology will depend on other new technology, that's just the way things are. It's not about screwing over customers, it's about being able to do things you couldn't do before, or giving the programmers a little break and letting them work with something better designed for the task. Upgrading is just a factor of using a computer. People should just get used to it sooner or later (especially people that are developers).
  2. DrjonesDW3d

    Iraq 911

    Quote:Original post by Tha_HoodRat Strictly looking at USA casualties , number of soldiers killed in Iraq 3081 ( and rising) , number of civilians killed 911 terrorist attacks 2973 (+24 missing pressumed dead ). My question is why isnt everyone as horrified at the iraqi war as they were when 911 happened? What am I missing? Im not counting the Iraqi civilian or soldier casualties, just looking at the American casualties. Why are people not reacting to this? THe soldiers are american citizens as far as I can tell so why am I the only horrified person at the water cooler? The big tsunami a few years back killed 300,000. AID's killed an estimated 2,800,000 in 2005. 40,000 are killed in auto accidents every year in the US alone. That list could go on and on and on. As dry as it may seem, a few thousand lives really isn't that many, whether it's all in one event (9-11) or over a few years. If I am going to be "horrified" over something, it's going to be based more on the numbers and not on the media hype.
  3. DrjonesDW3d

    Which Vista Type should I buy?

    Quote:Original post by Senses777 I am not an expert on the subject, but I've heard many of the drastic changes for Windows Vista compared to XP will not be immediately visible to users, but rather only to developers. Very true. I'm fairly shocked at how quickly some people are into believing that vista is just a pretty new interface with a bunch of new bugs. According to what I have seen, the estimates are that Microsoft had ~10,000 people working on Vista on and off for 5 years. Costs (not just salary, but health benefits, PCs, etc) are estimated to be $10 billion. For comparison, Sun has made a big deal about spending $500 million over 10 years to develop Solaris. You'd have to be pretty bold to think that Microsoft would spend that much money on something and have nothing more to show for it than a pretty face. If you dig around a bit on channel 9 you'll find TONS of really cool, really massive changes behind the scenes (such as a completely new driver framework for hardware developers). Yes, most of these changes benefit the developers the most, but in a way, that also trickles down to benefit the end users. Such as a developer being able to write up a fairly complex USB driver from scratch in a week. Yes, that is awesome for the developer, but it also benefits the users since that driver can be run in user mode, and be much less prone to bugs than it's winXP counterpart. As much as I know it's against the popular opinion (of wait a year+ till a service pack is released) I'm very happy that vista is finally out and look forward to myself (and my customers) using it more. I'll be using the business edition at work, mainly because of the features such as the automated backup and Windows Meeting Space. For home I'll probably go with Ultimate, since I sometimes work from there, but some of the other multimedia features could be nice as well. Also, there is a family pricing thing right now, where if you buy the ultimate edition for yourself, you can pick up two copies of the home premium edition for ~$50 each. Good if you have a laptop and desktop or something and are getting the ultimate anyway.
  4. DrjonesDW3d

    Who has RSI / carpal tunnel

    About a year ago I started feeling pain/discomfort in my wrists when at work. I was a little worried at first, since it's a big thing for someone who works on a computer. However, with just a few small changes I now don't feel any discomfort at all. The changes that helped the most, were putting my monitor at a proper height. Most work desks are flat. People put the keyboard on the desk, and the monitor as well. This always leaves the keyboard too high, or the monitor too low. Proping the monitor up on a couple books or something to put it at eye height really helps a ton. I believe the "experts" say that if you look straight across your eyes should hit the monitor about 3/4 of the way up it. The other change I made, was moving from a generic Dell keyboard to the Microsoft Ergonomic Keyboard 4000. After just those two changes, the pain pretty much went away after a week. Easy things that can go a long way.
  5. DrjonesDW3d

    WoW Guild gets nasty

    Quote:Original post by Radan Quote:Original post by DrjonesDW3d How about myself? Between the time the game first came out (11/23/04) and it's first anniversary (11/23/05) I had ~115 days played in the game (don't remember the exact value but have the screen shot somewhere). This is a little less than 1/3 of my time that year was spent playing the game. During that time, I also worked a full time job (at the same place I am still at), lived on my own (nor received any financial help from my parents) and was getting no help from the government. Could you please describe the time schedule of your typical work day from that period, spent playing 8 hours of WoW. A fairly detailed description (Job,Meals, travelling to and from work, sleeping, housework and hygene activites, WoW). I'm not doubting you, I'm just genuinely interested in how would such a schedule look like? I had a ~7 minute commute to work, so that didn't take up too much time. I would do housework (or whatever else has to get done, like paying bills) during times in which I was online, but not needed (ie if we already had 40 people who were raiding). I probably averaged about 6 hours a day m-f. (that being 6pm-12pm usually). There might be a night or two that I stay up playing till maybe 2-3am if there was something going on. I also might spend maybe saturday or sunday in a long 12hr or so playing block. Or, if I had a few late night runs, I would sleep in on the weekends to make up for it. If I had something with family or friends/coworkers I'd probably go out on Friday or Saturday. Again, I think what a lot of people missing is that they are assuming that that during that full 6 hours a day you are supposed to be playing, you can't do anything else. That is false. Granted, most that time, you will be playing, but there are lots of little things that clutter your week that you can get done during that time. There are all kinds of healthy meals that you can make that take < 10 minutes or are things you don't have to actively sit and interact with for long periods of time (ie can start it, play some, then get it). It's not the most convenient way to get all those little things done, but it's really not that bad. After a while you figure out how to fit that stuff in nicely. Now, with that, since I've already lost enough rating from the defending-an-unpopular-point-of-view-in-a-discussion-thread syndrome, I don't think I'll try and add anymore to this debate. Though, I will chime in if someone who seems to have genuine interest has a real question that hasn't already been answered.
  6. DrjonesDW3d

    WoW Guild gets nasty

    Quote:Original post by capn_midnight First, let me dispell your ill conceived conclusions of me and inform you that I *have* played WoW, as well as other MMOs, including Runescape, Guild Wars, and Eternal Lands; I am no stranger to MMOs and I do not shun them as worthy pursuits of entertainment. WoW was an activity that I engaged in with some of my coworkers. At my peak, I was playing 3 or 4 nights a week for about 4 hours a night. It was how we socialized when we couldn't go out to a bar or club. I even picked the game up again when I was considering moving to Illinois so that I could stay in contact with them, but by then none of us were playing the game anymore. It was not, however, to the detriment of real social interaction, and I permanently cancelled my subscription when I started volunteering at a local theater house. I have been playing various games of different types for the last 20 years. I do not deny that certain elements of WoW can be fun, I do not claim that entertainment is a waste of time. The problem emerges when you spend the equivalent of a full-time job on a game for nothing more than "a sense of self accomplishment." When I said "in 5 years your accomplishments will mean nothing" I did not mean "because all the gear you won will be lost" I meant "because the game will lack relevancy". The majority of WoW players today never played UO, and the "accomplishments" of the UO players that moved on to WoW mean nothing to the WoW players with no UO experience. Your experiences are not commutable. The only person who will care about your accomplishments is *you* and that amounts to not much more than intellectual masturbation. In contrast, volunteering with a local community service organization provides you with the same socialization opportunities, the same project management opportunities, provides a meaningful, positive impact for the community, and is demonstrable to future employers of skills that you have learned. You continue to describe the WoW endgame, which I am already fully aware of due to my own experience with the game, as well as conversations with my friends. In fact, it was the deciding factor for me leaving the game. The WoW endgame is a bad game. It uses psychologically addicting elements to hook players and keep them playing. The "100 deaths before 1 victory" that you describe is not a "masterfully crafted puzzle." A sufficiently brilliant person should be able to figure out any puzzle without resulting to trial and error. Trial and error runs are the de facto indicator of poor game and puzzle design; this is known. In relating your activities, you have only managed to make me disrespect you more. Here, you are capable of phenominal levels of teamwork and project planning, and yet you choose to use those skills in completely selfish and meaningless endeavors. As I said before, you could be volunteering at a local shelter. A "sense of accomplishment" is nothing, it can't feed you, it can't clothe you. Entertainment is important and valuable, but entertainment ended long before 8 hours a day. It is unhealthy and selfish. Sorry, I didn't realize this was a I'm-a-better-person-because-I-volunteer-and-help-others debate. Now that I know that, I'll stop. There is obviously no point in 'discussing' this when everyone's mind is already made up. I could talk about the people I play WoW with, and how it has helped some of them keep them out of trouble and develop social skills they were lacking, but that would be pointless I guess, because they aren't starving on the streets, and why do things that help anyone, unless you are helping those who need it most, right? Also, even if we were going to help those people, playing a game is not the most efficient way to do so. Who cares if we enjoy it immensely, and if we have made a ton of great friendships that exist well outside the game. It's something we spent a lot of time on, and since it wasn't the most beneficial thing we could possibly be doing at the time, we are all wasting our lives away, and we should of seen that. I could also talk about how some of my guildmates are the most unselfish people I have ever met, but again, it's pointless, because it's a 'meaningless endeavor.' I was going to go raid now, but I guess I'll go sit on the couch and watch some TV instead. Thanks for the advice, really appreciate it. P.S. Name me one (successful) game that doesn't use "psychologically addicting elements to hook players and keep them playing"
  7. DrjonesDW3d

    WoW Guild gets nasty

    Quote:Original post by Scet Quote:Original post by DrjonesDW3d I think people are also confused by the fact that it's possible to do other things while playing. Most guilds allow people to take a night or two off if they have something they want to do. Most guilds also don't care if people take 15 minutes off from playing to help their kids with something or put them to bed. Also, if your guild has 45 people online, and you can only take 40 into the instance, than 5 people are free to do other things for a little while. WTF they "allow" it? Do people really feel they have to ask permission from some faceless WoW users to do things in real life? Sad. Is it sad that people need to ask permission to miss a practice for a highschool sports team? What about if you are part of a meeting with 40 other people, where everyone needs to be present? How successful would it be if everyone can just get up and walk out to do other things whenever they want? Knowing that the meeting can't move forward unless everyone is present? I realize that this kind of constraint might be a foreign concept when applied to a game, but again, for people in this situation, it's more of a hobby. When you have that many people who need to be present you need some kind of coordination. I can't speak for everyone, but in my guild, we have no problem with people taking time off. We aren't going to say people can't go out and have fun with their friends because we need to raid. For us "allowing" it to happen simply means letting us know. The reason we do that, is so that we can prepare for it. It's easy to have 1 person not show up all the sudden and then leave 39 other people sitting there staring at the wall. If we know you aren't going to be there, we can prepare for it, rather than sitting around with the hopes of you showing up at some point. It's really not to much to ask. Those constraints are simply the ones that exist when you have a large group of people who need to work together on something. I agree that it's a different thing, but won't necessarily say that it's a bad one.
  8. DrjonesDW3d

    WoW Guild gets nasty

    Quote:Original post by Salsa I don't know. Personally, I think working on building a house with a group of trusted friends would provide a much greater sense of accomplishment/achievement. A virtual success in a fictitious world seems like it would be an incredibly shallow feeling. It's very common to hear cheers and yells of excitement after accomplishing some of the more difficult tasks. (if you watch some videos of 1st kills on youtube you can see this). You don't get the feeling simply because the boss is dead, you get the feeling because all that hard work has finally paid off. It really is quite unreal.
  9. DrjonesDW3d

    WoW Guild gets nasty

    Quote:Original post by frizzlefry So, you are identifying values you've been taught throughout your life and applying them to WoW. The sense of accomplishment is real. Does the electronic interaction truly translate to an interpersonal setting as wholly as you claim it does? (And don't be offended. I'm not attacking you or your decisions. This is all so foreign to me, I want to give credit for any positives possible. Of course, feeling the effects of a spouse who plays WoW- not obsessively anymore- I am leaning towards the idea that this particular online accomplishment has only minor real world value. However, I am open minded.) Hearing those values throughout your life, and actually applying them in life are two totally separate things. Really seeing the payoff has a HUGE impact. I'm sure not everyone in this situation gets as much out of it as I do, but I at least know that I am not alone, by seeing how it has positively impacted others. A lot has to do with how you play the game. There are lots of people who play as much or more than I do, who simply do other things inside the game with their time. One of my friend's girlfriends has spent a grand total of about 200 hours fishing in the game, simply because she finds it relaxing. I'm simply trying to show people, that people who play the game in the way that the original post was reference, can get a lot out of the game. It can be a very beneficial thing. I don't see how it's possible to work on any complex task with a large group of people for multiple weeks and walk away from it empty handed.
  10. DrjonesDW3d

    WoW Guild gets nasty

    Quote:Original post by Way Walker Quote:Original post by DrjonesDW3d Is it really fair to classify people as readily as so many people here are? If you know that you shouldn't judge them all based on that one persons decisions, than why do you? Because I've known many people to put this sort of time and effort into a variety of things. Not a single time has it been healthy for any aspect of their life (well, maybe their pocketbook, but I think money is a sad end). In other words, I'm not judging based on one person, I'm judging based on a consistent pattern. Again, I could introduce you to people who would change your mind. But, it seems like you already have made your decision.
  11. DrjonesDW3d

    WoW Guild gets nasty

    Quote:Original post by Way Walker Quote:Original post by DrjonesDW3d With the sheer difficulty of them, I'd like to think that there are some people who wouldn't ever accomplish that task, regardless of how much time it has taken. Apparently the capn wasn't so ignorant after all... He was trying to make the point that the only thing you gain from playing the game in this way, is the gear your character gets, which is lost after you stop playing. He is wrong in that. The difficulty involved with some of the encounters is where the real payoff comes from. Things that are hard, are hard for a reason. I don't have the exact numbers, but I'd say that most would agree that maybe less than 1% of current WoW players have defeated the current "boss" (Kel'Thuzad). Himself and the encounters leading up to him were incredibly difficult. Many of the guilds who were able to beat previous content ran into a wall trying to get to or past him. It's also not that likely that many more people will kill KT in the future, simply because the expansion is coming out next week, and better rewards will be easier to obtain. Anyone who has been part of a team who has worked their way up to that point should be proud, because it is a very difficult thing to do. There are tons of people who play a huge amount who haven't seen him die.
  12. DrjonesDW3d

    WoW Guild gets nasty

    Quote:Original post by BeanDog Maybe my view of a whole 8-million-person swath of the human race shouldn't be influenced by one anecdote, but so it is. I personally knew a woman whose husband left her and her three children alone and unemployed (and his wife was recently out of the hospital for back surgery). Why did he leave? His wife demanded that some of his 40-hours-a-week MMORPG time be redirected to spending time with her and the kids. It was EverQuest, not WoW, but same difference. No one would deny that stuff like that happens. The media does a fairly excellent job covering that side of it. I simply hate the fact that people are so readily able to accept being prejudice against a group of people simply because of stories that this. I can give you many examples of cases where the game has had vast positive impacts on someones life. Is it really fair to classify people as readily as so many people here are? If you know that you shouldn't judge them all based on that one persons decisions, than why do you?
  13. DrjonesDW3d

    WoW Guild gets nasty

    Quote:Original post by Fuzztrek Quote:Original post by DrjonesDW3d I don't know about you, but any of those things are things that I would look for in a resume. The kill of the boss is simply the end product, there is a LOT that goes into it that you (and others) are unaware of. If I was in a position to hire someone, and I found out that they have killed Nefarian or some other major boss, I would be very impressed, because I know that doing so takes everything from patience to teamwork. From my own experiences in pick-up raids, I have seen that World of Warcraft "success" can come even from a large group of very disorganized, self-centered people who exhibit not an ounce of teamwork. Obviously, it's more enjoyable and satisfying to, say, kill Nefarian with a group of people who's there for the guild and committed to the task, but the mere fact that he was killed doesn't tell you anything about how it happened. I guess my point is that no encounter in WoW requires teamwork or patience. Encounters require time. This is true in a lot of ways. Yes, encounters require time, but that doesn't mean the other components should simply be ignored. A person who was with one of the earlier guilds to kill Nefarian or another such boss would naturally impress me more than someone who killed him later with a PUG. Mainly, because even though all encounters do require time, they are a lot more difficult when they are fresh and the strats aren't completely known. Also, to some extent, I could argue that in some cases time isn't the only major factor. There are a lot of encounters in Naxx that are designed with very little lenience towards error. Those fights require a lot of paying attention and quick thinking from everyone in the raid. With the sheer difficulty of them, I'd like to think that there are some people who wouldn't ever accomplish that task, regardless of how much time it has taken.
  14. DrjonesDW3d

    WoW Guild gets nasty

    I think people are also confused by the fact that it's possible to do other things while playing. Most guilds allow people to take a night or two off if they have something they want to do. Most guilds also don't care if people take 15 minutes off from playing to help their kids with something or put them to bed. Also, if your guild has 45 people online, and you can only take 40 into the instance, than 5 people are free to do other things for a little while.
  15. DrjonesDW3d

    WoW Guild gets nasty

    Quote:Original post by Mithrandir I call shenanigans. Quote: - You must play at LEAST 7-8 Hours a day. This is on a normal day not just leveling up. We are NOT a softcore fun casual guild. We are hardcore dedicated players and are only looking for others to join us. I dare you to show me one person who plays a minimum of 49 hours /week of WoW and is a "successful" person who isn't living off the teat of a spouse/parents/government. Remember: that's 49 hours MINIMUM. How about myself? Between the time the game first came out (11/23/04) and it's first anniversary (11/23/05) I had ~115 days played in the game (don't remember the exact value but have the screen shot somewhere). This is a little less than 1/3 of my time that year was spent playing the game. During that time, I also worked a full time job (at the same place I am still at), lived on my own (nor received any financial help from my parents) and was getting no help from the government. There were also several people I knew who this was also true for, though many had higher playtimes (I think ~140-150 days was the upper limit). Again, that includes people who worked full time or were going to school. I don't play that much anymore, as we only raid 6 days a week, and I often take days off to visit family or go out with friends, but I'd guess I still average a good 35 hours a week. This is also on the low end in my guild. I'm sure we have several who do play 49 hours a week or more. I can give you many other examples if you wish. I don't see how you can speculate that it's not possible, when I know for a fact that many people are doing it. Also, I should note that we have had several member's who stopped playing because of a change in their situation. Many people gave up the game because they couldn't budget it anymore due to a new constraint or opportunity in their life. Such as the mother I mentioned above has a sister who is in a bad situation, and volunteered to take in the sister's child so that the sister could get her life together. As a result, she stopped raiding with us, though she still would log on quite a bit and do things like collect materials to help us prepare for raids. That way, she didn't feel obligated to play, and could put the game down at any moment for any length of time if she had something she needed to do. [Edited by - DrjonesDW3d on January 11, 2007 3:55:34 PM]
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