lmelior

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About lmelior

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  1. Composing an Indie RPG Title Track

    Yes. So much yes. I love this track.
  2. Where's the second half of the article?  It cuts off right when it's about to get to the good stuff!  It doesn't mention that mergesort is O(n log n), which IIRC is the theoretical optimum for sorting algorithms (and it's pretty interesting to implement, too).  Then it might bring up space considerations and sorting stability, which can also be important depending on the situation, and compare with heapsort (though that might be confusing since it's not really divide-and-conquer).  Then it might discuss how randomization can turn quicksort, an O(n^2) algorithm, into an algorithm that often performs better than most O(n log n) algorithms in practice.   That would make a more complete intro on writing fast (and good?) algorithms, at a minimum.  At the risk of making it even more of an article about sorting, it might link a few hybrid algorithms and discuss how popular languages/libraries implement their sorting algorithms, e.g. python and Java 7 use timsort (hybrid of mergesort and insertion sort), and g++ uses a hybrid of introsort (which is itself a hybrid of quicksort and heapsort) and insertion sort.  That would be a good time to remind people to not reinvent the wheel when it's not necessary, since in most languages it's easier, faster, and almost certainly less error prone to tell the built-in algorithms how to handle your game's objects rather than writing your own algorithms.
  3. Proof God doesn't exist?

    [quote name='Daniel O'Neill' timestamp='1302215402' post='4795708'] I honestly dunno, as I said, I assumed, I have a lot of doubt in my assumptions,[/quote] Without choosing sides [s]and igniting another rehash[/s], let me just use this post to refute a very common misconception about debates about religion on the internet (one that was repeated a few times in this thread): They are not pointless. Sure, you might not convince the person you're talking to, but somebody who isn't so sure is going to come along and read what you guys wrote and start thinking about it. Or at least, they should. That's never a bad thing.
  4. What's the best Linux library for 2d games?

    I think if there was definitively a best library then it would be the only one. I would say go give Allegro a shot since you're pretty much already set up for it, and check out Guichan, which has built-in support for Allegro as a back-end.
  5. Help with Recursion in C++

    Also, it's especially good practice to put the constant first if you will be sharing code. Consider the time back in 2003 when somebody inserted malicious code into a CVS clone of the main BitKeeper repository for the Linux kernel. In the wait4 function they added: [code]if ((options == (__WCLONE|__WALL)) && (current->uid = 0))[/code] A handy little backdoor to gain root privileges for any program you choose simply by calling wait4 and compiling with the right options. Maybe you and everybody with push access to your repository is sharp eyed enough to catch these every time, but requiring the constant on the left means you don't have to be.
  6. Profiling == Valgrind ?

    FYI, Google uses valgrind + wine to test the Windows version of Chromium. [url="http://winezeug.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/valgrind/doc/win32.html"]http://winezeug.goog.../doc/win32.html[/url] [url="http://wiki.winehq.org/Wine_and_Valgrind"]http://wiki.winehq.o...ne_and_Valgrind[/url] But, if you only want profiling, then valgrind is overkill. Aside from AMD Code Analyst and Very Sleepy, there is also Proffy and Shiny: [url="http://developer.amd.com/CPU/CODEANALYST/Pages/default.aspx"]http://developer.amd...es/default.aspx[/url] [url="http://www.codersnotes.com/sleepy/"]http://www.codersnotes.com/sleepy/[/url] [url="http://sites.google.com/site/paulrichards/proffy"]http://sites.google....richards/proffy[/url] [url="http://sourceforge.net/projects/shinyprofiler/"]http://sourceforge.n.../shinyprofiler/[/url]
  7. Python help please?

    Try the wiki with the older documentation...the website isn't quite there yet. For example: [url="http://www.renpy.org/wiki/renpy/doc/tutorials/Remembering_User_Choices#Implementing_a_Point-Based_Game"]http://www.renpy.org...oint-Based_Game[/url]
  8. I have very little knowledge in this area, but some time ago I was reading up on what it might take to add JIT support to a certain language. This led me to LLVM and I came across this tutorial: http://llvm.org/docs/tutorial/ It walks you through the creation of a simple interpreted language with JIT, starting from C++ or OCaml. I have no idea how useful this is or if it even below what you're trying to do (the only data type is double), but it seemed pretty interesting.
  9. Using Blender

    Blender 3D: Noob to Pro Older version as in 2.4 or before that? If you're using the 2.5 beta, I doubt there is much material out there.
  10. AI contests

    So I had a lot of fun participating in the Google AI Challenge, even though I didn't get to finish my real bot (just a simple tweaked version of the example) due to NaNoWriMo. Today I checked out the latest Full Circle Magazine (for Ubuntu), and there were a few articles on this new one: http://www.freiesmagazin.de/third_programming_contest Is anybody participating in that one? The Google one was exceedingly simple to get into, this one doesn't seem so easy. Are there any other AI contests like this? It sounds strange but Matlab Central has AI contests twice a year. Those are also fun to watch.
  11. Windows Programmer coding in Linux

    You'll probably want to look at various IDEs as a first step. It's impossible to say which one you'll like best, but I like to point people towards Wikipedia's comparison: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_integrated_development_environments#C.2FC.2B.2B This might also help: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/24109 Personally I'm a (g)vim user, and the small stuff that I've made has been simple enough to either compile by hand or write a quick Makefile. Other tools like gdb/ddd and valgrind are relatively simple enough that I haven't had the desire to use an IDE. But like I said, that's just from my limited experience and small projects.
  12. GD TOS

    Look at the thread below yours. :) It would be more obvious with a subject like yours though.
  13. Issues breaking into the industry?

    Quote:Original post by RapidCrash Should I attempt to find a job for some game company, or do you think I won't have enough experience? Should I attempt to actually complete the game I've been working on, even without any decent graphics or sound for the sake of completing it? Yes. Not sure where you are, but there is likely a community college within driving range that has a deal with the closest state university, where you can take most of your general classes on the cheap which will transfer in full when you do. If you're income situation is as you claim, you should qualify for a hefty dose of grants, and could probably cover the rest with work-study through the university, and certainly subsidized loans (where interest doesn't accrue until you graduate or leave school) for anything not covered. Good luck! P.S. If you mostly complete your game with placeholder graphics, you shouldn't have much difficulty getting an artist on board.
  14. FAST euclidean distance

    Shot in the dark: can you adjust the nodes without knowing which is the closest? Repeating Kylotan's suggestion, if Manhattan distance suffices, you should be able to do everything in one step by simply adjusting every node based on the distance in each individual dimension. Obviously this moves nodes much faster "diagonally," so it depends on the application. Unfortunately I don't know enough to say if the overhead of changing every single node weight outweighs the time spent looping through the nodes twice (or however many times you do it).