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brent_w

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About brent_w

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  1. brent_w

    Anyone program on a netbook?

    For me 13 inch laptops are the best route for (mobile) coding. Still small enough to cary around ... but not so small that the keyboard is scaled down. edit: Sure it's nice to say "use a desktop" ... but when you're moving around all the time, ESPECIALLY if you're a student, mobile coding is just far too convinent to pass up.
  2. brent_w

    Good Game Design Schools

    I've been told that Savannah College of Art & Design is good. http://www.scad.edu/
  3. brent_w

    I have lots of revision to do...

    Links that force one to register make me cry.
  4. brent_w

    Don't let the door hit you on your way out, Texas.

    Oh, Glen Beck isn't just a little weird. At present, the man is a whole bag of fries short of a happy meal. I am quite sure he is well on his way to completely losing it. [Edited by - brent_w on April 16, 2009 7:44:38 PM]
  5. Quote:Original post by SwarmerThe only kind of emergency that I think this would be useful for is Skynet taking power. We do need to be prepared ...
  6. brent_w

    Self Taught Programmer Success

    Quote:Original post by Talroth I don't know about the rest of you, but I much rather deal with 2As, or even a 1A than a 2B.I definitely know the 2B type. I was in a situation once, where there were two groups in close proximity working on their own projects. The team I was on was led by a 2A ... the other team was led by a 2B. Now I wouldn't say for a minute that the other group's leader didn't know what he was doing ... because he did. He was a damned genius. But I couldn't imagine working with him. More than once, our work flow was interrupted by the noise of the *arguments he started. He treated his teammates like rivals instead of partners, and everything else done on his team was "completely wrong" and only he knew the "right way" - and all that stuff they did had to be redone so that it conformed to his code. I really felt bad for the folks on his team. edit: * - And by arguments I mean: A teammate trying to calm him down while he ranted in their face about how wrong they were and how much more important his experience was than theirs.
  7. brent_w

    Mac OS X: Way better than I expected

    Quote:Original post by owl Quote:Original post by brent_w My favorite things in OSX ... um it's been a few months ... I think its like the F11 and/or F12 keys? That's officially my new signature. Haha. Ok. At least I think it's those two keys ... ;-p
  8. brent_w

    Mac OS X: Way better than I expected

    Maybe it's because when I grew up the first 2 computers in my family were an Apple ][c and a Mac Performa ... but for years I've been a PC owner with respect for macs. Something which ... apparently ... is sacrilegious. I have to admit, I was caught off guard by the lashing I got the first few times I stumbled into an internet discussion and commented that Macs really weren't as bad as every there seemed to think they were. ==== Anyways, I haven't owned a Mac since I was a kid, but ended up using them at work and at school and I immediately liked OSX. I don't see myself buying a mac anytime soon for a variety of reasons ... but that doesn't stop me from respecting that they've got a really good product. === My favorite things in OSX ... um it's been a few months ... I think its like the F11 and/or F12 keys? All of the open windows get instantly and smoothly tiled across the screen -- you simply click the one you want and it comes to front ... all others return to their previous positions. I LOVE THAT :D And then the other key slides all the windows off the edge of the desktop then easily returns them when you want them back. And their implementation of widgets (or whatever) was around years before Vista's sidebar ... and Apple's implementation of those is still a hell of a lot better IMO. edit: Oh, and like the OP, I too love the dock - Its like they took common operations from the task manager, the context menu, and my programs from the start menu, and actually put them all together in a convenient place. I prefer to have it hidden and pop up when I brush the bottom of the desktop.
  9. brent_w

    Piracy is really bad in the indie gaming community.

    Quote:Original post by ChurchSkiz I really feel that people don't enjoy pirating games. They want to contribute, they want to play the game, but they want to make sure they are getting a good deal. Make it attractive to the customer to do the right thing. I really wish I could be so optimistic about it but such an idea clashes completely with all of my personal experience. Every pirate I've met seems to fall into one of a few categories: Oblivious - These are the: "hey! free game! cool!" type. They don't even seem to grasp that what they're doing is wrong. They just see something that they can get for free. Denial - These are the type that know exactly what they're doing. They know that they shouldn't be doing it. But they're not going to stop anytime soon. So they tend to get defensive about it, toss around excuses, and generally just seek ways to legitimize their behavior. Anarchist - This type takes pride in what they are doing. In their minds: piracy is how they "stick it to the man". Oddly enough, the third type is the kind I find the least frustrating. Heh. The Oblivious type's carelessness and cluelessness just infuriates me. And the Denial type are lying to themselves and to me. At least the third type know what they're doing and are honest about it.
  10. brent_w

    Piracy is really bad in the indie gaming community.

    Quote:Original post by phresnel Quote:Original post by brent_w Quote:Original post by phresnel Quote:Original post by CodaKiller If only 12% of the people who torrented it bought it for $10 then they would have made more profit. I am pretty sure that at least 12% of them would have been willing to shell out $10 instead of torrenting it. What gives you the impression that nobody of those who torrented it has actually paid some fee for it after trying it a bit? That is the most laugable defense of piracy of all. The infantesimal number of people who actually use the "try then buy" piracy style are statistically insignificant. "Piracy style" ... Everytime you mention "statistically" you also must provide sources for this. And no, knowing about friends and neighbours is not statistically representative. Correct. I probably should have said ... "I believe the ..." "... to be statistically insignificant". I, personally, am quite sure that there is not a significant number of people who actually purchase products after pirating. Quote:OT: Sidenote regarding main video game market piracy In germany, most sellers of video games state that games are non-returnable, once buyed. So you have only a single legal choice to try what you buy (trying a game out in the store is, imho, insane, as you won't be able to decide whether you like the game or not within ten minutes), which is video game rental. The problem being: Not every village has a video rental shop (and even then, it might not have what you want). And not everyone is interested in being a member of some remote rental shop, and not everyone is interested in online rental (including me). Then, when I compare market sales of games vs. game-magazines, it seems that many people are not interested in buying game-tests; though I can't say how many people read game tests online. According to all this, you either have the choice of paying up to 60 EUR (roughly 80 USD) for something that is potentially shit (write-only move-semantics that money transfer has), or not buying it at all. That was the legal way.People being too lazy to read reviews, play demos, and use the internet to find out about a game's reception is not an excuse for piracy.
  11. brent_w

    Piracy is really bad in the indie gaming community.

    Quote:Original post by superpig Quote:Original post by brent_w The infantesimal number of people who actually use the "try then buy" piracy style are statistically insignificant. Source?I'll admit I have no documented "source". It is pretty much impossible to get concrete numbers on this - after all. Especially when the target population is extremely likely to lie about it. And anyone who would trust the results of such a poll would be, at best, naive. Most who are aware that their activities are inethical will seek legitimization - a way to justify their behavior. However. We can get a pretty strong picture by going out and meeting people that pirate ... learing about them and their activities. Out of the many people I have met who pirate games - I've not met one, ever, who actually purchased the games they enjoyed. Most laughed or acted agitated when even asked about it. In fact, the only place I have ever seen people who claim to be the "good kind" of pirate is on the internet ... where most pirates encountered seem claim they are the wonderful innocent kind. Given these experiences you must cirtainly understand my skepticism. Edit: Also, in my experience, almost everyone I've met who pirates games does not really equate the sale of a game to someone else's livelyhood. It's just a cool game they can get for free. The thought that someone might rely on its revenue isn't even there - so what possible motivation to purchase would they have?
  12. brent_w

    Piracy is really bad in the indie gaming community.

    Quote:Original post by phresnel Quote:Original post by CodaKiller If only 12% of the people who torrented it bought it for $10 then they would have made more profit. I am pretty sure that at least 12% of them would have been willing to shell out $10 instead of torrenting it. What gives you the impression that nobody of those who torrented it has actually paid some fee for it after trying it a bit? That is the most laugable defense of piracy of all. The infantesimal number of people who actually use the "try then buy" piracy style are statistically insignificant.
  13. *groan* That was it. (Could have sworn I tried that already.) Sorry I wasted so much of your time. >.< Thanks for the help though.
  14. Ok, I fixed the "\Include" bit ... no idea how I missed that. I also checked for the d3d9.lib and it's in the x86 folder. Also, I'm definitely not building an x64 project. But I'm still getting the error. It only seems to work if I use the #pragma comment(lib,"d3d9.lib"); line. VS makes linking so much more complicated than any other IDE I've worked with - I'm always running into linking errors. :-( I've built programs in VS2008 with other libraries before, especially openGL and SMFL, and it took me a while to get the kinks out with linking those but I didn't run into this kind of trouble.
  15. I think I did it right, but I'd be happy to have you double check. Here you go:
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