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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

booomji

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  1. http://blog.udacity.com/2014/03/new-content-interactive-3d-graphics.html?utm_source=social&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=updates&m=1 @pointinpolygon aka Eric Haines is back ! Have fun. b
  2. Hello, I feel gameinstitute has the informal-formal structure you are looking for. www.gameinstitute.com b
  3. While that is a good resource in general, it's not what the op would want to go to immediately. As suggested, khan academy is fantastic. The op can start at a level he feels comfortable with and the explanations will get the intuition across faster. betterexplained.com is also a good place to cross reference while at khan. All the best. b
  4. Erich Christmas arrived early for me.   I thank you and Autodesk profusely for putting this resource out there. It's super useful and digestible for meat heads like me.  The download links will make the learning very productive.   Bravo   b 
  5. The work-for-hire model for dev studios is very uncertain. After you finish a title, you need to line up another one ASAP, or otherwise you've got to have huge layoffs until you do find more work. One company I worked for was deliberately making pitches that quoting prices below what they knew it would actually cost, knowingly making a loss on the work, because they didn't want to lay off their staff -- they'd rather lose a little bit of money over a long period, rather than be sitting idle paying everyone's salary with no income. They thought they were just weathering the storm, trying to stay afloat during a tough time in the industry, but you can see that if all the big developers were doing this, then the littler ones who can't afford to make a loss were just screwed! There's been quite a big shift recently among smaller developers, with many more trying to work on "original IP" instead of licensed titles. The problem with this model is acquiring the funding to support development, which traditionally was provided by a publisher (just like the work-for-hire model). Seeing how Kickstarter has exploded in the past year though, I'm really hopeful that crowd-funding will allow these smaller devs to independently work on "new IP" without betting their survival on the whims of a publisher.   Sounds exactly like my industry.  http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/rhythm-hues-bankruptcy-could-affect-421775   http://carpetbagger.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/02/27/the-economics-of-visual-effects/   keep an eye on this blog www.vfxsoldier.com   b
  6. Both ways "could" lead to the same place but my own experience (through hurt as daaark put it) has got me going back to getting the language and paradigm down over blustering through a game.    So "along" with doing the gameinstitute courses i am religiously following these resources.   http://see.stanford.edu/see/lecturelist.aspx?coll=11f4f422-5670-4b4c-889c-008262e09e4e http://see.stanford.edu/see/courseinfo.aspx?coll=2d712634-2bf1-4b55-9a3a-ca9d470755ee   fwiw   b
  7. safixk, I see you already found what you are looking for but will recommend www.gameinstitute.com none the less. The mentors know their work,are extremely helpful and it's set-up so that you dont have to invest any more than you can handle / afford. [quote name='slayemin' timestamp='1352133902' post='4997617'] So, what's the lesson here? Learn how to study, especially when you don't *have* to do it. All of the tutorials and books you're rejecting are [i]probably [/i]good sources of programming knowledge. You don't need a tutor, you just need to learn how to sit down and start studying. (and, what would an online tutor do? They'd just write more tutorials to guide your learning, but the problem is most likely in your ability to consume the material) Here's another tip of advice: Video games are software. Software has to be created by programmers. Programming games is just a subset of programming software, so if you see articles on programming and decide not to read it because it has nothing to do with games, then you're wrong. If you get good at programming in general, you get good at programming games. So, read those articles on how to design your software architecture. Learn how to write code to interact with a database. Discover how those datastructures and algorithms work. These all become tools in your toolbelt which you can pull out and use on your game programming project! [/quote] Golden. This has been my personal experience as well. b
  8. [quote name='Bill Fountaine' timestamp='1352143404' post='4997687'] I want to get the fundamentals of [u]computer[/u] programming/[u]science [/u]down, at first I figured learning a language was it. But I was obviously wrong. [/quote] Came to the same conclusion myself after many years. As others have suggested, Ron Pentons Data Structures for Game Programmers is educational and entertaining at the same time.get it. Also: [url="http://see.stanford.edu/see/lecturelist.aspx?coll=2d712634-2bf1-4b55-9a3a-ca9d470755ee"]http://see.stanford....3a-ca9d470755ee[/url] Best of luck. b
  9. Thanks. Yes, i've been told that. Was just hoping to rope in an experienced hand (for money). Will post my progress. Once again thanks for your input. b
  10. hello, like to ask some of the more seasoned vets here their opinion and make a proposition. i've always been fascinated by this old game by microprose. Sword of the samurai. http://www.abandonia....e+Samurai.html http://en.m.wikipedi.....i_(video_game) If some of you old timers have played the game,how much coding do you wager went into this ? With today's tools,is it possible to make the game as a one man show. If possible,what is the time frame this can be coded in and what would it cost you. having done basic c++ game engine programming(3D buzz vtm's) i think i can manage some aspects but the entire project still looks overwhelming. I need a very experienced guide to help mentor me,someone who could knock this out blind folded (may be a retired coder or a whiz kid ) Finally,how much money would you think is fair trade for such guidance / mentorship. This is not a commercial project. Just a personal hobby project i wanted to get done over the years. thank you so much for your time. b
  11. hello, like to ask some of the more seasoned vets here their opinion and make a proposition. i've always been fascinated by this old game by microprose. Sword of the samurai. http://www.abandonia....e+Samurai.html http://en.m.wikipedi.....i_(video_game) If some of you old timers have played the game,how much coding do you wager went into this ? With today's tools,is it possible to make the game as a one man show. If possible,what is the time frame this can be coded in and what would it cost you. having done basic c++ game engine programming(3D buzz vtm's) i think i can manage some aspects but the entire project still looks overwhelming. I need a very experienced guide to help mentor me,someone who could knock this out blind folded (may be a retired coder or a whiz kid ) Finally,how much money would you think is fair trade for such guidance / mentorship. This is not a commercial project. Just a personal hobby project i wanted to get done over the years. thank you so much for your time. b
  12. Quote:Original post by Thaumaturge Heh, that was indeed the reason that I gave so vague an answer - I wanted to be confident that it wasn't homework before I gave too much. ^^; Fair game.I understood that. I've been around for a while now(under boomji). b
  13. Hey thanks. Articulate answer here... http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?f=98&t=705408 r = the radius of the sphere d = the distance away from the center of the sphere x = your new radius rearranging the distance formula we get. x^2 = r^2 - d^2 x = sqrt (r^2 - d^2) "What is this for, if I may ask?" not for school assignment i assure you ;) Thanks. b
  14. Hi, Scenario: 1. a sphere of radius: 100 2. a circle shape of radius: 100 3.I align the circle to the sphere I want the circle to start with radius 100 and when i take it(or animate) down to the bottom of the sphere(pole) it should zero out in radius. Ring conforms to the circumference on each step of it's way down. What would the math be in this situation. i could hack this by: 1.At each step along it's down path(circle Pivot) shoot a ray to the sphere and use the the magnitude to drive the radius. but that wont further my mathematical understanding of the problem. Thanks for any help. b