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inkdrips

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  1. Turned out my game mogul 1 is an rpg I have made a map and am focusing my design efforts on this one game for the moment meanwhile chipping away at python and taking your guys' advice as best I can.
  2. thankyou that is really helpful, that is a lot to digest and it looks like I have a lot of work to do. I think I will need to invest many hours each week in the game design documents alone, on top of studying programming.   Also can you point me to some design doc examples/resources that might be useful?
  3. okay I've moved it here - http://www.gamedev.net/topic/667099-wanting-feedback-on-two-design-ideas/
  4. I've finally settled on a programming language, python. Reading 10 pages each day, 70 pages and 7 days into it. I have sketched a couple of pages for two game design ideas, and am interested in getting some feedback from experienced designers/writers. It's not much documentation at this stage but that's why I'm looking for feedback, hoping to get some hints about where I can elaborate/what might need polishing. I'm about five books away + practice from being good enough in python to start on my games but I do hope to be able to build at least a prototype of each idea in about 18 months.   I have attached the rough drafts of each premise.   I have studied 23hours in C#, several weeks in javascript, a little bit of C++ and some Logic before finding python was a perfect fit. Also I used to write games in BBC BASIC - that's the most code I've actually written. I feel like I have alot to learn before I come to write my own code.   (This is my favourite game design concept - Brick Dropp and Stabb, but it is too complicated for a first game, it requires alot of level design - platformer and puzzles.)
  5. I never liked the idea of building a physical prototype it seemed too clunky and complicated as a process. Me and my friends would play games and I would be the architect of sets of rules that would create new games. Writing rules is a certain kind of game design that I've always been interested in. Then came computer programming and you didn't just create rules but art as well. Then the whole industry hiccuped out of its own butt and became anew and I didn't manage to learn a relevant programming language, so here I am late to the game pushing myself to read up and tinker with python every day. My motivation is the game designs that I've been scratching together - all very conceptual stuff. That I'm hankering to put together and playtest. My motivation is a break from the usual kind of writing that I do - young adult novels and film scripts.
  6. I've finally settled on a programming language, python. Reading 10 pages each day, 70 pages and 7 days into it. I have sketched a couple of pages for two game design ideas, and am interested in getting some feedback from experienced designers/writers. It's not much documentation at this stage but that's why I'm looking for feedback, hoping to get some hints about where I can elaborate/what might need polishing. I'm about five books away from a proficiency in python but I do hope to be able to build at least a prototype of each idea in about 18 months.   I can email a pdf, so send me your email if you're keen to give me a critique.
  7. I've been learning javascript - I liked starting to learn it because I was finding the process of learning it was fluid. Alot of what I'd learned about C# still applies, but in many cases there are simpler solutions in javascript. The only part I'm not looking forward to is learning the html, html5, css and css3, which you need to go underneath javascript. What I find confusing is I always end up with bugs and I don't know why. Mainly I make changes to my pages half way through, and it doesn't like that. It prefers you to plan it all out first and know how it's all going to go, so that you don't change your mind halfway through - which can change many things without you realising it. Does that make sense?   I loved being able to open a blank dreamweaver file, write some code and run a program. alerts is where I'm starting. I've hired a tutor (an hour each week) and I'm learning from books as well. I was thinking of learning python as well, once I'm confident with javascript, but I'd like to utilise javascript for both games and websites.   Yes, I'm very indecisive, and I'm sorry if it's annoying. I think of choosing a language as a big decision and I'm always indecisive when it comes to big decisions.   I chose javascript because I enjoyed the process of learning it. I chose python as a second because I like local desktop gaming as well as web games.   I like javascript because you can see it working straight away, and I find it intuitive and fluid to learn. I dislike html because if I change my mind and rearrange the code halfway through I get bugs. But because I chose javascript, I will try to conquer html, css, html5 and css3.
  8. I'm not liking game maker so I'm going to switch to javascript and try to force myself to figure out css and css3 as I learn js and html5 (and canvas).   I like the demo that Karsten posted, I was thinking of graphically a bit bigger, but I like the style and approach. The background looks similar to what I would like. I'd be keen to make my characters more realistic. And heavy up the mechanics. But something like that would be a good place to start.
  9. I'm a writer, 2d cartoonist. I want to get into 2d game development so I can showcase my artwork and designs. What about Dark BASIC? Or is there a simpler/better language to learn. JustBASIC? - or will that restrict me graphically. I want to build games like RTS: The Sims, Close Combat, RPG: Phantasy Star, FInal Fantasy, Adventure: Discworld 2, Monkey Island, Arcade: Galactic Swarm.   I'm not sure about Python or Lua, they seem gargantuan. I'm thinking small in scale, say 30 levels but big in mechanics and simple graphics.   Does anyone know anything about BlitzMax?   I would love to get this kind of look for my games - http://www.gamedev.net/page/showdown/view.html/_/polyherder-games-r52147   I have posted an early brief for my first game Mogul 1: High School Hustler here - http://www.gamedev.net/topic/660318-ive-given-up-already-now-i-want-to-try-again-gml-or-something-else/   I decided to go with javascript, html5, css and css3.
  10. I apologise for hijacking the thread. I didn't think about it. So it looks like Unity and C# are the way to go.
  11. thanks that sounds like the right way to go. I'll hit game maker and schedule in some crunch time.
  12. I did 23hours learning with a tutor - C# and got bogged down with all the maths. apparently alot of it doesn't need to be known in order to make games.   so i gave up on C#. Flash is too expensive because adobe charge a ridiculous amount if you're not a student. I hate html5 because CSS confuses me. game maker seems restrictive. I don't know if unity is the best fit when I want to make graphically simple mostly 2D games. My favourite genres to make are adventure, strategy, simulation, application-esque (games that look like office software) I got top of my school 98% in high school end of year algebra exam, then never studied maths again. I got my degree in writing feature film screenplays. Now I write novels and am a movie critic. And conceptual designer. I want to make 2d games in my spare time. I've coded in Logic and BBC BASIC. I tried to learn Liberty BASIC but got stuck at arrays. and those graphics aren't all that appealing. not to mention the audio. Amiga/Archimedes are the kind of graphics I aspire to. Or sega master system if you prefer a console comparison.   My game design influences are Vector (OUYA),  Earthworm Jim, Limbo, Streets of Rage, Discworld 2, Super Meat Boy, Fez, Kula World, The Sims, Close Combat and Syphon Filter. As well as Gynoug, Gain Ground, Populous, Hacker Evolution: Untold, Osmos, Jurassic Park and Robocop Vs Terminator.   and are there any good books on unity for absolute beginners? Is unity even a good choice if I want to specialise in 2d. and simple graphics. Python seems like a mission.   What else is out there.   How much can you build in Game Maker?   For example if the following is my premise, can I make it in game maker? Or would I be better off with some other engine and/or language. I mean I could hire a tutor to teach me Game Maker and GML because I'm that stupid when it comes to maths.  
  13. In my spare time and with all my spare money I run a small amateur game team - developing my first game with Blender - it's a robot simulation. I'm writer/producer but I want to be more involved in the programming process.   What's the best system (programming language or tool/game engine) to learn for 2d games.   Here is my concept. Please help me. I'm frazzled.   Missions are things the player can do to earn money. The goal is to buy stuff and earn more money and act like a pimp. Quests are smaller steps needed to achieve in order to progress through a mission. The game is set in high school. The goal of the game is to make money. There are six different enterprise missions. Money buys clothes, cigarettes, pies, pepsi and tattoos. If Ned goes too long without pepsi he falls asleep. If Ned goes too long without pies, he dies. As long as Ned wears out of date clothes, he is in danger of being beaten up without provocation. Unless he has completed the porno mission. If Ned is dressed like a white rapper, goths will beat him up. If Ned is dressed like a goth, other goths will congregate near him – potential customers. If Ned is dressed preppy, girls will congregate near him – potential models, but goths will beat him up. If Ned is dressed bland, or trendy, no one will beat him up. No one will congregate near him. He will have to be proactive to find customers. Eventually Ned will die from malnourishment - Doctor: “What did you think? That you could live on pies and pepsi forever?” There is no way to avoid this ending.     “You must get rich, any way you can. There are six concepts floating around in your ambitious little brain for making money, right now. Choose one and go for it. You need to buy clothes, cigarettes, pies, pepsi and tattoos. So you need money. What are you waiting for? Do it Ned!”   Enterprise Missions 1.      Trading Cigarettes 2.      Selling stolen porno mags and cigarettes 3.      Starting a miniature painting business 4.      Selling stolen magic cards 5.      Betting on fights 6.      Selling erotic photos of female friends     I think my game will be edgy but not illegal, somewhat tasteful there will be censor bars ie cigarette brands/17 year old nudity. I did 23hours learning C# and got bogged down with all the maths. apparently alot of it doesn't need to be known in order to make games.   so i gave up on C#. Flash is too expensive because adobe are aholes if you're not a student. I hate html5 because CSS confuses me. game maker seems restrictive. Can you do 2d in unity? and are there any good books on unity for absolute beginners? Python seems like a mission. WAAAAHHHHHH! help please?
  14. According to many people on the internet it doesn't essentially matter what language you learn as your first language. So keeping that in mind I decided to learn the language that I already have a ton of books for - which is C# and C# is one of the Unity languages. Yay!   First, I do plan on making 2D games at least to start with.   My two first game ideas are:   1) an online game that behaves like a social network. 2) an rpg with digital card game elements.   My plan is to take the simplest core of the game and attempt to implement it, once I have a grounding in C#.   Then to iterate on top of that core until I have a working prototype of the vision I have for the game. Then keep building on top of that. My rate of learning is to work through my nine books on C# and XNA at a rate of 30 pages each day. I'm already 30 pages in and I'm not blind or insane.   Does this sound sensible?
  15. Sounds great, I will look into javascript.