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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

BHXSpecter

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About BHXSpecter

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    Bloomington, IN, USA
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  1. Very informative. Gives a wealth of knowledge without overwhelming the reader.
  2. I love when GD.Net pops up gems like these. There are so many articles I've missed over the years that I quickly bookmark when they resurface. Absolutely great article that will always remain relevant.
  3. I had just bought that and Pro Motion a few months back. I like them, but haven't had the time I wanted to learn pixel art so now they are just sitting and patiently waiting on me to get back to them.
  4. No. Firstly, I can't imagine a university paying $6k for a simplistic game like Flappy. Secondly, some universities require you to do a degree mid-point full game project and a final (senior) full game project which per the agreements you fill out during registration allows the universities to use your work as examples for the degree, courses,etc. So you are paying them and giving them examples to use making it even more unlikely that they would pay money to have a team make a game to help promote them. So they have an endless supply of games from all the previous students that have finished their degree. For example, DeVry has my Global Destruction Torque Game Builder game and my teams FPS using Torque Game Engine Advance.
  5. Is this Jeopardy?!    What is examples of politicians being corrupted, failing to take responsibility for their actions, passing the buck to someone else, and grounds for impeachment?
  6. I just started trying to learn pixel art and 3D modeling. Nothing to show just yet though as it will all be utterly ugly.
  7. Just depends entirely what I feel like listening to. In Amazon Music I have soundtracks, albums and songs I play. One time I might listen to Ray Stevens, the next maybe chiptunes on youtube, the next maybe the original Ghostbusters 1& 2 soundtracks or Britney Spears, Metallica, Queen, Cash, Rogers, AC/DC, ZZ Top, etc. 
  8. The way it is broken down right now it is like so: Gamers on a budget consider VR a fad due to not being able to afford the equipment for it. Hardcore gamers with money to burn make it a niche market.  To make it a mainstay the VR set prices will have to drop drastically for more gamers to buy them, but the recommended PCs also will have to undergo price drops as the range I saw when VR first launched was ~$1300. To give you context of my income, it broke me for the month just buying my son a Playstation 4  at $350. While I would love to play around with VR and even try to develop VR games, it isn't going to happen unless I win the lottery. This is a great article and makes me wonder if we will see VR go mainstream. I know Youtube content creators do a lot of "Let's Play" videos for VR games.
  9. I think they were referring to Tiled: http://www.mapeditor.org/
  10. This article feels like it jumps back and forth between a postmortem and a lengthy advertisement to sell the game based on art style. 
  11. Breaking a minor forum rule put in place to prevent recruitment spam all over the site isn't reason to throw a tantrum. In his introductory thread he states he never completed high school nor bothered with college (so guessing no GED either) and vaguely states he studied game development. Then his locked thread mentioned above was trying to recruit for a team. The biggest problem I have is his utter vagueness as he never states what his experience is in regards to game development. If he has no team leading experience it could bite him as it would be his job as lead to motivate and keep the team on task. With such vague posts, I can't imagine a skilled programmer/artist/musician/etc (or beginner for that matter) trying to join since they have absolutely no clue what they are getting into.
  12. I'm always working on something, but since I never publish and they are always for me or my son to play with I never show anything I'm doing.