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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Mikea15

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  1. Hi guys!   I am releasing SuperStems in a couple of weeks, and I've made available a demo web build for people to try out and give me honest feedback. I'm currently polishing gameplay and other aspects of the game, such as sound and UI. If you feel you can help out, feel free to contact me.     You can test the game on itch.io   Thank you.
  2. #gamedev #unity3d #indiedev I need computer graphics books. Send me options please. I’m interested in the math, to create awesome shaders!
  3. Let there be #shaders !! #gamedev #indiedev #unity3d .. Now comes the fun part.. :) Game dev.. :p http://t.co/3rQ0iZJu34
  4. Diving hard into Shader programming with #unity3d . samples coming soon :) #gamedev
  5. fellow #gamedev !! want to learn #objectivec ?? here's #book you might enjoy http://t.co/enlrqMqx34 . I helped review it. :) #Programming
  6. Blog Post: Simple Achievement System in C# - http://t.co/IhuBpFh536, #CodeProject #csharp #development
  7. I guess.. double d = 0.0d; // lols.. double d's.. :)
  8. So I guess, I would have to re-think on how much control those classes provide. Thank you :)
  9. #csharp constructor chaining order solved. http://t.co/ujBOEUdO4z Check out the thread #gamedev #indiegamedev #indiedev
  10. Okay, so there is no "best way" to do it. That's what I wanted to know.   Thanks for the feedback.   Edit: To get a better view. Here's the main difference with another class. public X( ) { Left = 0; Right = 0; BreakLeft = false; BreakRight = false; BreakTime = 0; } public X(int speed) : this( ) { Left = speed; Right = speed; } public X(int left, int right) : this( ) { Left = left; Right = right; } public X(int left, int right, int time, bool breakWheel) { Left = left; Right = right; BreakLeft = breakWheel; BreakRight = breakWheel; BreakTime = time; } public X(int left, int right, int time, bool breakLeft, bool breakRight) { Left = left; Right = right; BreakLeft = breakLeft; BreakRight = breakRight; BreakTime = time; } And Method 2: public X( ) : this( 0 ) { } public X(int speed) : this( speed, speed ) { } public X(int left, int right) : this( left, right, 0, false ) { } public X(int left, int right, int time, bool breakWheel) : this( left, right, time, breakWheel, breakWheel ) { } public X(int left, int right, int time, bool breakLeft, bool breakRight) { Left = left; Right = right; BreakLeft = breakLeft; BreakRight = breakRight; BreakTime = time; } For this particular case. This is the better approach. It has less code, Its easier to maintain and is cleaner.
  11. Hello.   So I've been dwelling on this topic today. Which is, which way do you want to chain your constructor.   Say you have a basic BaseMap class. public class BaseMap { protected int _height; protected int _width; protected Node[,] _map; public BaseMap() { _width = 0; _height = 0; _map = null; } public BaseMap(int width, int height) { _width = width; _height = height; _map = new Node[_width, _height]; for (int x = 0; x < _width; x++) { for (int y = 0; y < _height; y++) { _map[x, y] = new Node(x, y); } } } } Now my question is, how you chain the constructors? So far, I've been chaining them this way: public class BaseMap { protected int _height; protected int _width; protected Node[,] _map; public BaseMap() { _width = 0; _height = 0; _map = null; } public BaseMap(int width, int height) : this( ) { _width = width; _height = height; _map = new Node[_width, _height]; for (int x = 0; x < _width; x++) { for (int y = 0; y < _height; y++) { _map[x, y] = new Node(x, y); } } } } But I've searched online and found people where chaining the other way around. Like this: public class BaseMap { protected int _height; protected int _width; protected Node[,] _map; public BaseMap() : this( 10, 10 ) // default values { } public BaseMap(int width, int height) { _width = width; _height = height; _map = new Node[_width, _height]; for (int x = 0; x < _width; x++) { for (int y = 0; y < _height; y++) { _map[x, y] = new Node(x, y); } } } } So, from what I understand, people are instantiating with default values, when calling the default constructor, leaving it empty. My Approach was to start with the constructors with parameters, and call this( ) to instantiate variables, before getting into the parameter constructor's body. This particular example isn't the most obvious tho, but say you have a node with edges. public Node( ) { Adjacents = new List<Node>(); State = EnumNodeState.UNKNOWN; } public Node( int x, int y ) : this( ) { PosX = x; PosY = y; } This makes sense, right? I instantiate the List and state, then define position, when calling Node( 10 , 10 ); Is it 'better' to do it the other way around?   Thanks.
  12. Woo! 65K #Unity3d vertice limit fixed :) Highlighted area is 125x125x4 vertices ( 62500 ). #gamedev #indiedev http://t.co/gylUGQyMCL
  13. Blog Post: Multi-Threaded TCP Server - http://t.co/I7Tp7AiMsn, #Client #csharp #dotnet