• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Demosthenes

Members
  • Content count

    944
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

1194 Excellent

About Demosthenes

  • Rank
    GDNet+
  1.   Hey,   What file extensions do your textures have and what are you using them for?
  2. Hey, I'm now into week 3 of Get In The Ring's development. A friend told me the camera was a bit jerky and pointed me to this excellent article that covers anything and everything about cameras in side-scrollers. For now I've adopted the camera smoothing approach where the camera chases the player position instead of always being centered on it. It helps when the player jumps around to counter enemy attacks. I've also been implementing a new enemy that grabs the player and leaves him (more) vulnerable to enemy attacks if he doesn't react fast. Gameplay video:
  3. Get In The Ring is our new game, currently in the second week of development. It's a top-down brawler inspired by the combat system in the latest Batman games, coupled with the constant upgrade progression systems of games like You Must Build A Boat. It's being developed in Unity, here's the first gameplay GIF: The game uses Unity's 2d Physics system to manage player and enemy movement and collisions, with the occasional "cheating" to move the player quickly when counter-attacking. The physics system seems to handle this quite well. Unity also provides a TimeScale variable that makes the slow motion effects easy to do.
  4.   Thanks for the heads-up!
  5. Just realized now I didn't even talk about this game here before. Suit Suit go is a puzzle/card game where you upgrade cards by making sequences. It was developed with Unity. It's free and our first game to be ad-supported. Please give it a try! iOS: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/suit-suit-go/id1011220863?l=pt&ls=1&mt=8 Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.onceabird.suitsuitgo&hl=en
  6. Twitchy Thrones is out now for Android! And also iPad. Google Play link: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.onceabird.twitchythrones App Store link: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/twitchy-thrones/id898649182?mt=8
  7.   Sounds great, I'll give it a try.
  8. That is nearly four times the size reported by Unity, so where does all that additional data come from? I am just wondering because 60mb for just additional stuff seems a lot. Thats like if I forget to strip debug symbols and wonder why a library is 100mb instead of 1mb...     I don't think it's additional data, just Unity using uncompressed versions of assets on runtime... like mikiex said, it must make a difference in runtime memory usage when you employ compressed assets.
  9.   Thanks! I will.
  10.   Great point. I didn't look it up, but there probably is a difference that must be balanced with your pretended app size.     The size of the app in iPhone isn't a direct correspondence with the size reported by Unity. For example, right now my app occupies now more than 80 megs in my iPhone and Unity reports 21.9 megs: Textures 12.2 mb 56.0% Meshes 0.0 kb 0.0% Animations 115.1 kb 0.5% Sounds 3.1 mb 14.1% Shaders 42.9 kb 0.2% Other Assets 532.5 kb 2.4% Levels 102.2 kb 0.5% Scripts 442.6 kb 2.0% Included DLLs 5.2 mb 23.8% File headers 115.7 kb 0.5% Complete size 21.9 mb 100.0% Used Assets, sorted by uncompressed size: 2.0 mb 9.1% Assets/Fonts/Resources/Fonts.png 1.5 mb 7.0% Assets/Sound/Songs/ThemeSong.mp3 1.3 mb 6.1% Assets/Fonts/Resources/CutsceneFonts.png 1.0 mb 4.6% Assets/Fonts/Resources/MenuFonts.png (...)  As for using PVRTC, it is an alternative as mentioned in the first link of the original post, but in a pixel-art game such as the one mentioned any blurriness would be jarring... And for this and many other games it's more convenient to use the assets as produced initially. Also, PVRTC requires width == height.
  11. Cool! Is it possible to move the file automatically to the StreamingAssets folder with such a script too?
  12. Hello, I've been busy porting Twitchy Thrones to Unity. The game was originally programmed in Objective-C, using XCode and the Cocos2D framework. Cocos2D is a great framework but if you want to publish your game for iPhone, Android and PC you have to use C++ and Cocos2D-X. Setting up Cocos2D-X isn't trivial and using C++, of course, implies losing comforts like automated memory management. As for Objective-C, it's almost exclusively used by Apple and thus can't be used, as far as I know, to port a game to other platforms. This is actually a Good Thing, since it is a monolithic programming language, full of unnecessarily verbose syntax and lacking modern programming language features such as generics, real encapsulation, string operators, etc. So I turned to Unity and C# to publish Twitchy Thrones on Android and PC. I'm finding Unity amazing, except for a few quirks. If I knew before what I know now I would have started the project in Unity to begin with. Everything was going well, except... When the Objective-C/Cocos2D version was originally published to the App Store it occupied 17.3 MB on my iPhone. After most features were implemented in the Unity version I installed it on my iPhone expecting a similar file size. Nope. 156 MB! In these days where most games are free or freemium, a big file size can change someone's mind when it comes to downloading your game. What follows is information I found scattered across the web to solve the problem of Unity's output file size, which I hope will be more useful gathered in one place. As mentioned in Unity's own article about reducing file size (http://docs.unity3d.com/Manual/ReducingFilesize.html), the editor log provides a summary of the size of each of your assets after you perform a build of your project. This is what I got for mine: [quote] [font=arial]Textures 65.2 mb[/font][font=arial] 79.6% [/font] [font=arial]Meshes 0.0 kb 0.0% [/font] [font=arial]Animations 113.1 kb 0.1% [/font] [font=arial]Sounds 10.2 mb 12.5% [/font] [font=arial]Shaders 42.9 kb 0.1% [/font] [font=arial]Other Assets 543.3 kb 0.6% [/font] [font=arial]Levels 92.8 kb 0.1% [/font] [font=arial]Scripts 439.5 kb 0.5% [/font] [font=arial]Included DLLs 5.2 mb 6.4% [/font] [font=arial]File headers 99.8 kb 0.1% [/font] [font=arial]Complete size 81.9 mb 100.0% [/font] [font=arial]Used Assets, sorted by uncompressed size:[/font] [font=arial]6.1 mb 7.5% Assets/Sound/Songs/ThemeSong.mp3[/font] [font=arial]2.7 mb 3.3% Assets/Menus/WorldMap/WorldMapBirdFlockMiddle.png[/font] [font=arial]2.7 mb 3.3% Assets/Menus/WorldMap/WorldMapBirdFlockBottom.png[/font] [font=arial]2.7 mb 3.3% Assets/Menus/WorldMap/WorldMapBirdFlockTop.png[/font] [font=arial]2.1 mb 2.5% Assets/Maps/Map16/HelpPanel6.png[/font] [font=arial]2.0 mb 2.4% Assets/Fonts/Resources/Fonts.png[/font] [font=arial]1.3 mb 1.5% Assets/Menus/Main/BannerFinalChallenge.png[/font] [font=arial]1.3 mb 1.5% Assets/Menus/Main/BannerFinal.png[/font] [font=arial]1.0 mb 1.3% Assets/Maps/Map16/Map16Background.png[/font] [font=arial]1.0 mb 1.2% Assets/Menus/WorldMap/WorldMapClouds2.png[/font] [font=arial]1.0 mb 1.2% Assets/Fonts/Resources/MenuFonts.png[/font] [font=arial]946.8 kb 1.1% Assets/Menus/Settings/SettingsFinal.png[/font] [font=arial]946.8 kb 1.1% Assets/Cutscenes/Cutscene2/Cutscene2Banner.png[/font] [font=arial]946.8 kb 1.1% Assets/Cutscenes/Cutscene1/Cutscene1Banner2.png[/font] [font=arial]946.8 kb 1.1% Assets/Cutscenes/Cutscene1/Cutscene1Banner1.png[/font] [font=arial]946.8 kb 1.1% Assets/Cutscenes/Cutscene2/Cutscene2Cup.png[/font] [font=arial]768.3 kb 0.9% Assets/Menus/WorldMap/WorldMapClouds3.png[/font] [font=arial]768.3 kb 0.9% Assets/Menus/WorldMap/WorldMapClouds1.png[/font] [font=arial]710.3 kb 0.8% Assets/Menus/WorldMap/WorldMapBackgroundLand3_2.png[/font] [font=arial]710.3 kb 0.8% Assets/Menus/WorldMap/WorldMapBackgroundLand3_1.png[/font] [font=arial]710.3 kb 0.8% Assets/Menus/WorldMap/WorldMapBackgroundLand3_0.png[/font][/quote] [font=arial]Except for the theme song, all my biggest assets were textures. The problem is, while XCode uses the compressed .png images and even compresses them further with pngcrush (https://developer.apple.com/library/ios/qa/qa1795/_index.html), Unity uses the raw texture data, resulting in enormous file sizes. [/font][font=arial]In Twitchy Thrones' case, a 2D pixel art game, reducing the texture quality wasn't an option since any blurry texture stood out from the rest of the game.[/font] [font=arial]The first solution I came across was bypassing Unity's content pipeline and loading the textures from the .png files in real time. If you change an asset's extension to .bytes, Unity treats it as binary data (http://docs.unity3d.com/Manual/class-TextAsset.html) and doesn't unpack it, thus the asset won't bloat your file size. Here's Unity's code sample from loading a texture from a .bytes file:[/font]//Load texture from diskTextAsset bindata= Resources.Load("Texture") as TextAsset;Texture2D tex = new Texture2D(1,1);tex.LoadImage(bindata.bytes); A script component was added to each GameObject containing a SpriteRenderer using the offending giant texture and on the Awake() function the texture was loaded using code very similar to the above. A sprite was then created with the texture and this sprite was set to the GameObject's SpriteRenderer. Problem solved, I thought. But when I booted the game on iPhone, a screen that took less than 1 sec to load before now took more than 10 secs! The performance of Texture.LoadImage is simply terrible. Luckily, someone with the same problem lead to the solution, the WWW api (http://answers.unity3d.com/questions/511268/texture2dloadimage-too-slow-for-use-ios.html). The game ran perfectly on Unity's editor, but when running on iOS I got an "unsupported URL" error. Back to Google. Most threads referring the same error warned that the URL is case sensitive and spaces need to be replaced with "%20" as with any URL, but that was not the problem. My problem was, Unity packs the assets in its own format and doesn't keep the original file structure, so the file I was trying to load in the URL didn't exist in iOS. Fortunately Unity provides a way to keep the original assets in their original form in the final build, the "StreamingAssets" folder (http://docs.unity3d.com/ScriptReference/Application-streamingAssetsPath.html). Note that unlike "Resources" folders, which can be placed anywhere in the hierarchy of the "Assets" folder, the "StreamingAssets" folder must be placed in the root of the "Assets" folder. After placing the textures in the new folder, with their extension changed to .bytes for the reason mentioned above, I changed my GameObjects and respective scripts. Here's one of the final GameObjects (The Sprite should be set to "None" in the SpriteRenderer): And a link to the SpriteTextureLoader script (Sorry for not putting it here but the formatting got messed up when I tried): http://www.onceabird.com/tt/code.txt A couple of notes: The main downside of this method is that the sprites won't be visible in the Editor when the game's not running. But then again in most cases this method should only be implemented when the game is nearly done, as premature optimization is the root of all evil. Although I haven't experimented, this method should work with other asset types, such as textures for models in a 3D game. I chose to create a script component for each GameObject where needed, but obviously this code can be used to load all textures in a loading screen if needed. I only changed the biggest textures so far, but right now Twitchy Thrones occupies 87 MB on my iPhone, which is 55% of the original size. EDIT: Fixed linked SpriteTextureLoader script to work on Android.
  13. Twitchy Thrones is out now for iPhone. It's free until November 5th: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/twitchy-thrones/id898649182?l=pt&ls=1&mt=8 Here's the release trailer: And some screenshots:
  14.   Thanks!
  15. [color=rgb(41,47,51)][font=Arial]The beta version of Twitchy Thrones is ready! If you have an iPhone and want to help us test/improve it please go here: [/font][/color]http://tflig.ht/1w0mXSn More information about the game here: http://forums.toucharcade.com/showthread.php?t=211741 Here's the game in motion: