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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Xenoclix

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  1. Nice sounds, wanted to know what type of DAW you used for your creations ?
  2. You use the same approach like you use with everything else . If you really want to do something, do the RRPE - Research, Read, Practice. Enjoy. Thats what i have been doing, not in programming, but in audio compositions. I had same knowledge like yourself, nothing, even though im abit older - i applied the RRPE and dedicated my free time in searching for what i wanted to know and then used that new found info into practice. In terms of schools, its hard to say as all countries are different - in Australia, i know there are dedicated game courses you can take and they will specialise in that sort of development process and workload. While i mean dedicated game courses, i mean dedicated game schools as its not a generic "University" with a bunch of courses for everything. I found them advertising in the newspaper, yet i dont see them online etc. So research aswell, you might find good courses that arnt in your standard uni. I cant help you with programs as im not a coder. Most of all, ENJOY! If you dont enjoy it, you wont do very well - i tried various game development areas (programming, graphics (3d) etc etc) and even though i managed abit with them, i didnt enjoy and lost interest, with audio its my love, keeps bringing me back for more. Good luck!
  3. I had another look at the new design of the portfolio and it is mighty improved since the original! Looks nice and professional, nothing fancy what dosnt mean its a bad thing but clean and easy to navigate and easy on the eyes with nice contrast in colours. Good work!
  4. No problem! I had a look at http://vhabion.net (assume thats the one your referring to) and its basically the idea i was coming across with the border and change of background and content box etc. It looks more appearling to the eye overall. Ill be more than happy to help if you need any help with the design or anything .
  5. Well everyone is different when it comes down to planning but planning - with everything - is one of the most important parts to get something going. When you say you have been planning a game for awhile - have you actually put out a plan, so you know what its about, the atmosphere you want to bring and so forth? Or you are still in the "i want to make a game" phase and still thinking on the overall structure of it? If not - write down some categories such as the genre (sci-fi, modern etc), Story/background (Where is it set, characters, setting, atmosphere), Purpose/Goals (What is the goal of the game), Style (FPS,RTS,etc) - and so on. Cut the planning categories into stages and when you have done that, you can go onto the next thing. Then comes down to "how" you will make it - what experience do you currently have, are you are programmer, artist, musician - find out what you are good at and go then work around the flaws. What i mean by that will depend on how big your game will be - if its a small game like pong, tetris, small small, then being a programmer with bad graphic skills can still get away with a decent game depending on experience. If you plan on a bigger more complex game, then maybe you have some friends who may be able to help out, spread the workload and skillsets to work together. Or find a team if the interest and commitment is there. Overall there are many ways to go along with how to start - but you havnt really specifically said what you have at the moment so i gave a general idea for you to look at. Hope it helped.
  6. Well it comes down to what you absolutely want to accomplish in terms of designing your layout the way you did. What program/s did you use to create it? In terms of "Content" you bring it across in a basic but easy to get to fashion. Just like a word document but on the internet with links. I have moreso always been about design and looks when i go and create websites and so forth - its always first impressions when people come visit a site, this relates to anything. Your portfolio is a basic, generic and boring for first impressions - to spice it up abit more but possibly keep the same layout would design a border or "template" such as a more colourful background for the title and content below. A good idea might be having a border around the content and outside the border have the background, so in the border leave it white whilst outside have it maybe a gradient colouring, or a different shade of colour all together. So the overall structure of the website will be the same, but some things to make it more appealing. But as i said, the overall portfolio gets the job done by bringing the content across to the user. Hope it helped abit!
  7. What i have done is that i did some looking around on various gaming development websites and went to job opensings and looked at what they require in terms of knowledge and skill - they usually state how many years and what programs they require you to have knowledge for. Drawing is a handy skill to have for doing modelling for games - but in most cases they have already someone doing that job and you usually end up working from their drawings to make your own. But in some cases, smaller development companies dont have all required employees so having a mixed skill set is always a plus. In terms of getting into the industry, practice what you love doing, in your case modelling and depending on how old you are, look at school courses that relate to what you want to do. Then after, look at uni courses to get the related certificates and knowledge from there. It always helps having all that sorted. In some cases you might get lucky and get away from just pure skill and not actually going to school for your actual skillset but sometimes employers dont look at you if you dont have the right qualifications. Some companies have internships that let you study and work with them and a possible job opening might be there after you finish. Just research and look around, read as much as you can and most importantly, have fun!
  8. Ahhh, fair enough, i think i should just continue to look around for just a midi-keyboard than rather than the others i was looking at previously. I just thought it would be good to get those but if a normal midi-keyboard does the same thing (because its just PC im using) then your right and getting one of the two i mentioned would be a waste as i wont use half the stuff on there. Thanks again!
  9. Sorry for double post - Have been looking at my local music stores up here and i have found the Yamaha PSR-E403 or the Casio CTK-4000. There is a 40$AUD difference from the Yamaha (being the more expensive) than the casio. I have been looking at some reviews on youtube and so forth to see what people have been using it for - but wanted you guys opinions aswell towards this keyboards itself :). Take note that it will mainly just be plugged into the PC for playing and editing rather than being ported around and being played normally :). Thanks again guys!
  10. Thank you very much for your responses guys! Really appreciate it and has helped a tremendous amount...know alot more than i did before and know now where i lean so i can take steps necessarily in achieving my goal! :). I will have a look at some trial versions of the software you have mentioned and check out some reviews etc and based on that i will go from there to buying a midi keyboard (will head down to the musical shop in my area and ask them aswell).
  11. Hey all, Want to get into audio creation for gaming - i love music, its my passion! So i thought i really enjoy the in-game music and always dreamt about having my creations get into the minds of other players and get them in depth with the game! First is that i dont realllly have any knowledge on how to create music - yet i have the talent of knowing beats, rhythms and notes on what goes good with what...how to make something work. So question would be is where do i start, what programs should i look at for beginning to create audio tracks - money is not an issue, i will happily pay for a decent software package if i can get what i want out of it. I am a fast learner in programs so i dont mind being dropped into the deep end as i have mastered photoshop and other graphical programs by sticking at it! That is really all i wanted to know, what is a good package to start off with, or a good package that is advanced but will last me awhile. Oh, and with music creation, is it best to get a keyboard? As im a shocker at guitar and other instruments, would keyboard best suite most audio programs? But use the keys for different tunes and tones rather than the basic "piano" sound kit. PS: with the piano, i mainly see these huge digital pianos, are there "flat" desktop ones that you can connect to the computer and have on your desk rather than a huge casing and stand etc. PSS: I think i might of answered my last PS - Piano and keyboard are different aye? Then my new question is, are keyboards good for game audio creation? Do they have any disadvantage or advantage that the normal digital piano has? Thanks!
  12. Hello all, I finally got around to getting ready to embark on a new adventure in graphics. I have done photography prior to this and graphic design for websites (Photoshop). From doing photography, i have taken wonderful pictures of landscape, cityscapes and other artistic views of the world what we live in. Im also a huge gamer and love it to bits. I wanted to take my eye for landscape etc and create my own in 3d for "future" games and development. Because this is all new, i would like some quick guidelines to what i should be looking at. Firstly, what programs are most commonly used by 3d designers, free or commercial. Also, with these, what are the best tutorial websites that start with the basics from the programs and gently move further up. Thank you, if i have not put to much detail in the questions, please say so and ill re-edit them. Thanks.