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walsh06

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  1. Im interested in the two parts of this statement. The first thing is you refer to games as an art form but then in brackets only refer to the "art". Are you referring to only art in this case or are you using the word art to refer to everything within a game? Your sentence sounds like the former but it would be quite bizarre if it was.   The second part then what value are you referring to. As entertainment, art form, learning, experience? There are a lot of arguments that could be made on both sides but it really depends what you mean.
  2. Im interested in something. You keep mentioned these other teachers and was wondering could you provide links to either the the courses they are running or some of the work that the students are making as a result of these courses. Also what are the backgrounds of these other teachers. Are they maths/art/other teacher who decided to do this or do they come from the games/software industry to teach. Are they big gamers, programmers, artists or multi talented. How long did they spend preparing before starting their respective courses?    I think the answer to some of those questions might give people here a better perspective on your side of things and how you think this course is run by the other teachers as you have mentioned them a number of times.
  3. Sorry yes, she used her maiden name when it came out.
  4. A fairly simple suggestion but it might help is the book "Challenges for Game Designers" by Brenda Romero. It teaches a lot of the basic concepts of game design in interesting ways and has a lot of challenges to try out these concepts. These are usually pen and paper/board games but the ideas can be easily applied to video games as well. I did a number of workshops with Brenda where she ran some of these challenges in groups and they were very fun and interesting and could translate well to a classroom environment. Certainly for some of the early weeks in your class anyway.
  5. While learning to program you can also start planning out the formulas and probabilities used in the simulation. Just do it on paper or like Buster said in excel. When I was planning out my basketball manager game I made a simple board game version during the early planning phases. It was a turn based game using dice to decide actions. It was simple but helped a lot in figuring out what would be needed in the simulation later and what factored into the result of an action. For example shooting uses the shooting ability, near by defenders ability, distance to the basket, are they using catch and shoot or dribbling first etc.... These are all things you can look at now.
  6. Everything you are talking about is definitely possible. You would simulate the match and present the stats of the teams/players and update them as events occur in the match. Simulating the events is the most important thing you will have to deal with in a game like this. It has to be accurate but at the same time have enough randomness that its not always the same thing happening. The other two things you mention are very straight forward to implement.   In terms of going forward with this you have few things you need to do. One side is the research, analysis and mathematical side of things. This is for developing the way events are simulated in the game. This can be done on paper or in something like excel as said earlier because its just a lot of numbers. The other side is to actually start learning to program.
  7. For weather in Ireland I would refer you to this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kGeoXG2V_kk which has become the latest sensation in Ireland. I would also say we have two of the biggest companies in gaming which everyone forgets about in Demonware and Havok. We have a government who promised a lot of things in relation to gaming and never deliviered and then lost the web summit. We have some great graduates from UL, UCC, UCD and Trinity (cos thats what people care about). And some of the best people in the world on a consistent basis.    But the most important thing is thing is the fact that you lumped UK and Ireland in the same conversation when the countries are quite different in a lot of ways. Also in regard to scotland, wales and england. Very different. 
  8. Made a basketball management game as my FYP in college earlier this year. I used C++ for development but also python for tools and analysis stuff, but I think any language would suit. It was all based on working with probabilities. Wasnt the best work but I did well in the few months I worked on it. Most calculations used a players ability, external factors (defenders, distance for pass/shot etc..) and some random noise so its not always the same. It simulated each decision of the players (both the ball handler and others) by looking at their possible options and calculating a value for each option. These would act as weights in a probability check. So any option could be chosen but the bigger weights are more likely to be chosen. Id advise looking up probabilities, simulations and sports analysis to get some more help. Not sure how useful any of that will be useful but it might help get you started.   Also out of curiousity whats the sport?
  9. Have to admit its weird seeing a bunch of people around the internet discuss your job. it has been a weird week  But Im excited for my future anyway.
  10. Thats still a ridicolous amount of time to not save. I hit ctrl + s after every few lines of code I'd say. Its just an instinct thing. But I also find it hard to imagine coding and not testing it at any point (which would lead to saving) for that long.
  11. Well, than in order for something like my idea of a fan-fic legalisation to happen, information about the difference is key. I wasn't even putting that much focus on the actual developers - like, I quess that its true that not even all CoD players know that there are two studios alternatively producing the next game. What I meant with that is more on the lines that its developers actually officially endored/licenced (I'm missing the proper english word here, sorry, I hope you still get it) by the IP holder - versus fan-made games which are, well, made by individual fans.   So I quess we can agree on that if it is possible to make a clear differenciation between what is fan-made and what is officially made, this would not be a problem? Since from what you wrote it appears that confusing a fan game for an official game is the main problem, not the fan-game itself (except point B) maybe).   Proved his point nicely there as there are actually three studios developing CoD at the moment. (Also all the other studios that help out for each release but three main ones)
  12.   In my ideal version of copyright laws, some money from Let's Play videos would be funneled back to the copyright holders automatically in a system similar to the music industry. I just don't like the idea of other people being allowed to just record video from playing a game and profit off the game developer in that way, with very little creativity added in. It might create value: advertising, maybe a little customer support / tutorial-style value, etc., but I think it should also more directly provide value to the developer. I should add that the current habit of people turning to videos for everything: video game information, news, learning how to program!!!, makes me feel like a cranky old man. Books still exist, right?   I would suggest you watch different youtubers then. Because the good ones add a lot to the game. For the top channels the personality is the draw and the game is just a tool used along with everything else. (I'm not going against the rest of your post, just the creativity statement).
  13. Formula D might be worth a look. Its a racing board game and its pretty good. I think this is how it works. You can change gears and each gear has an associated die. So the higher gear has higher numbers that you can move. But each corner has a zone you must stop in which means you have to try drop gears in order to not over roll the position. 
  14. ok, so the people with money will fund the game.... so how do they make money from it then, if their money is going towards the developers and the poorer players. And how do you expect the game to be made without publishers, developers, servers, managers, marketing etc...?? Although from the statement "and big ammounts of time without any life reward " I seems that you are misguided on the purpose of games so itll be hard to convince you of anything. 
  15. Lets say the game exists that suits your requirements. My big question is where does the money come from?? It has to come from somewhere. If you want the developers making a profit and the players making a profit then there has to be a source. The issue was already pointed out with EU that the player gets 90% of what they put in. Casino style basically. Some people will come out on top others will lose a lot but on average, the house wins. Which doesn't suit your game because most people are losing money. Also if the game is free to play (although Im still not sure what you mean by that) and people will "never ever will have the chance of buying an product to support the development", its very hard to see where that money is coming from.   Also its not nice to mock someone who has a gaming addiction so I would be careful what you are saying. I mean from your posts it seems like you just want to be compensated because you play games so much, instead of playing games as a hobby, relaxation, for fun etc.... So you are quite close to them. Of course I might be wrong but that's the impression you give off.