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ShadowStarshine

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About ShadowStarshine

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    Game Designer
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    Design
  1. Hello everyone. I'm a game designer with a bit of experience who has a fully fleshed out board game I want to turn into a video game. I'm looking for a dedicated programmer who has a bit of experience as well who is interested in bringing it to life. Game Basics Mobilizia was a 1v1 non-luck based strategy board game where the player builds, upgrades and controls an army on a grid-based board in attempts to reach your opponent's side, thus defeating him/her. The building and designing are based off a tech tree and using a dual economy system (Gold and Research) to make your own customizable army while the battle section is similar to chess, where each type of unit has its own movement and attack options. The game ends up played most similar to a turn-based Starcraft. Game Details The game is played in two phases, a buying phase, and a combat phase. The buying phase is double-blind, where each player buys unit buildings that spawn units, upgrades the current units, or increases their economy. There are 10 different unit types and 22 possible upgrades for those units. Each unit type has its own movement, attack range, health and attack damage and special property/abilities. The game puts these units and upgrades on a tech tree, making sure a sensible progression of possible things. After decisions are made, the players reveal to each other what they have purchased. After the reveal, a combat phase begins. Unit buildings spawn units onto a grid-based battlefield. Each unit on the battlefield will then be able to move and attack and/or using special abilities, taking turns back and forth, until all units have moved. Defeated units go back to their building spawners and can't come back for two turns. Any unit at the end of combat that is in your opponents last two rows, or "spawning zone" scores damage against the opposing player. Deal enough damage and your opponent is defeated.The average game is 35-50 minutes. Here's a Video Demonstration: The game's mechanics are all in place and have been thoroughly playtested, it only needs to be programmed. Further expansion on races/units will be explored after the core is built up. Why A Video Game? Most of the mechanics work as a board game, except for the aspect of secrecy when purchasing your army/upgrades which should be revealed simultaneously. Two main methods were used: Markers on your own personal board indicating what you are purchasing while utilizing a screen, which felt clunky as you had to move the screen on and off again and took up too much table space or a deck of cards, each representing the unique actions you could do, however with 50 cards always in hand and having to sift through them each turn was also distracting, time consuming and felt like you had way more options to consider than you did adding to player confusion.As a video game, the secrecy can be kept very simply by not showing the opponent your purchases until both players have chosen. While not game breaking issues, having it as a video game adds visual cues like greying out unavailable options will reduce perceived complexity and unit information can be condensed in a more visual pleasing fashion than a manual thus making learning easier. Talent Needed Lead Programmer, Partner - Able to choose a technology, program all/majority of the game, able to set up 1v1 matchmaking. Looking for someone dedicated to seeing a game through to the end. Previous Work By Me Rod Keller -Previously I've created a PnP game (Like Dungeons and Dragons) called Free Point System which allowed for fantastical character design possibilities.I have designed 2 card sets for M:TG as well as competed in a card design contest which I won.I've also worked on GameDev before with a team to create a small scope tetris close called Techtris, which was successfully completed. Compensation First and foremost, I just want to complete a working game as a goal. If we are able to get traction and release the project for money, I'm offering the following contract: 40% Myself 40% Programming 20% Art Sound to be purchased hourly. Costs for the game (server fees, software, marketing) to be taken out of all earnings before anyone else gets paid. Contact Me at Rodckeller@gmail.com Additional Screen Shots:
  2. Hello everyone. I'm a game designer with a bit of experience who has a fully fleshed out board game I want to turn into a video game. I'm looking for a dedicated programmer who has a bit of experience as well who is interested in bringing it to life. What is the game? The game, which goes by Wars of Keridor (for now), is a turn-based, grid strategy game. It started as a project for me to create a non-luck based game that was strategically deep enough to not be figured out. I worked for 8 months creating the board game, it is fully fleshed out and playable. I want to turn it into a video game because one of the mechanics, hiding information from each other, would be a very simple task on a computer. The board game version only had inelegant solutions to this problem. Each turn the players manage their economy to create and customize an army along a skill tree, which they then move on the grid battlefield much like a game of chess. The armies fight for position and deal damage by reaching the enemies side. Deal enough damage and the enemy dies. There are 10 different unit types each with 2 upgrades each. You can have up to 5 of any unit type. There are many combinations and strategies to use. What I'm looking for: I'm looking for someone with at least a bit of programming experience who is interested in this type of project and can see it through to the end. I've spent a lot of time on the project already and I'll continue to be around to make sure you don't have to do any guess-work, improve UI and look to market it if it starts to reach maturity. I need someone who can be as dedicated. You can choose the technology, I'd be willing to try something browser-based or standalone to target at steam. What I'm offering: While my main goal is to have this as a presentable project of my skills, if the game tests well with testers, and it is financially viable, I'll offer half of anything I would make. The pictures below are from a previous attempt, and give a bit of context of ways we can go and try as well as the complexity of the game. Contact me: Rodckeller@gmail.com
  3. Screenshots: http://imgur.com/a/Mg0B9   Game Basics   Mobilizia was a 1v1 non-luck based strategy board game where the player builds, upgrades and controls an army on a grid based board in attempts to reach your opponents side, thus defeating him/her. The building and designing is based off a tech tree and using a dual economy system (Gold and Research) to make your own customizable army while the battle section is similar to chess, where each type of unit has its own movement and attack options. The game ends up played most similar to a turn based Starcraft. The game's design offers a lot of depth, multiple possible openings and has so far dodged any oppressive dominant strategies that crush all else. Game Details The game is played in two phases, a buying and a combat phase. The buying phase is double blind, where each player buys unit buildings that spawn units, upgrades the current units, or increases their economy. There are 10 different unit types and 22 possible upgrades for those units. Each unit type has its own movement, attack range, health and attack damage and special property/abilities. The game puts these units and upgrades on a tech tree, making sure a sensible progression of possible things. After decisions are made, the players reveal to each other what they have purchased.  After the reveal, a combat phase begins. Unit buildings spawn units onto a grid based battlefield. Each unit on the battlefield will then be able to move and attack and/or using special abilities, taking turns back and forth, until all units have moved. Defeated units go back to their building spawners and can't come back for two turns. Any unit at the end of combat that is in your opponents last two rows, or "spawning zone" scores damage against the opposing player. Deal enough damage, and your opponent is defeated. The average game is about an hour. I recently made video demonstration here:    The game's mechanics are all in place and have been thoroughly playtested, it only needs to be programmed. Further expansion on races/units will be explored after the core is built up. Why a video Game? Most of the mechanics work as a board game, except for the aspect of secrecy when purchasing your army/upgrades which should be revealed simultaneously. Two main methods were used: Markers on your own personal board indicating what you are purchasing while utilizing a screen, which felt clunky as you had to move the screen on and off again and took up too much table space or a deck of cards, each representing the unique actions you could do, however with 50 cards always in hand and having to sift through them each turn was also distracting, time consuming and felt like you had way more options to consider than you did adding to player confusion. As a video game, the secrecy can be kept very simply by not showing the opponent your purchases until both players have chosen. While not game breaking issues, having it as a video game adds visual cues like greying out unavailable options will reduce perceived complexity and unit information can be condensed in a more visual pleasing fashion than a manual thus making learning easier.   Development   I created Mobilizia as a board game a few years ago and it was an 8 month process. A couple years later I decided I wanted to make it into a video game and had previously met a programmer from GameDev. The game was at least 50% built, but the programmer has since stop working and stop responding. The screen shots above reflect the work of the team. Although it is very disappointing to have to start over, a lot was learned during development that will make starting over a lot easier. I'm hoping to find someone who can commit to the end, as the game was shaping out quite well. Interested? Contact me at RodCKeller@gmail.com and let me know what you bring to the table and how you'd like to be involved. If we are a good fit for each other, we'll talk on skype and get to work! Thank you for your time. Team Structure Rod Keller - Designer, Manager, Promotion All the functionality of the board game was designed, playtested and tweaked by myself into a fully functional game.  Currently writing for adaptations towards a video game, hiring and promotional content. Talent Needed   Lead Programmer, Partner -   Able to choose a technology. Able to hire a crew if needed. Able to do most/all programming of the game. Basic server work (1v1 matchmaking). Commit at least 10 hours a week. Prefer some amount of previous experience.   Artist I need someone to improve the art assets for the game and who can advise me on a style. My two preferences at the moment are pixel style or colorful mix of realistic/cartoony that games like Blizzard makes. We need various things like Icons, Backgrounds, Menus and Creature Units. While animation will be nice for things, we will prioritize that based on available time.  Contact Method Contact me through my email, RodCKeller@gmail.com.  Previous Work by Team Rod Keller - Previously I've created a PnP game (Like Dungeons and Dragons) called Free Point System which allowed for fantastical character design possibilities. I have designed 2 card sets for M:TG as well as competed in a card design contest which I won. I've also worked on GameDev before with a team to create a small scope tetris close called Techtris, which was successfully completed.  Target Aim Retail on Steam - PC  Compensation Plan First and foremost, I just want to complete a working game as a goal.    If we are able to get traction and release the project for money, I'm offering roughly the following contract:   40% Myself 40% Programming 20% Art Sound to be purchased hourly. Costs for the game (server fees, software, marketing) to be taken out of all earnings before anyone else gets paid.
  4. ShadowStarshine

    Mock ups and copyright

    @SOTL   Thing is with speeding, a ticket shouldn't be your primary issue. It's the fact that you, or others can be killed. Laws/tickets are in place to prevent such behavior. I think that's what makes this discussion interesting, is the question: How scummy, if any, of a thing is making a mock up with others art for feedback? On the moral spectrum I'd have to say it falls well below endangering lives, but I don't know if I'd consider it squeaky clean either.
  5. ShadowStarshine

    Mock ups and copyright

    @Frob   I find that while my intentions could be non-scummy, using someone elses art to gain attention for your project starts crossing that line. It's hard, as a programmer and a designer on a team, to display what we have beyond text summations without art. I'm on a facebook group called Indie Game Developers and it's hard to even get feedback or attention without a product that has good art. As a hobbyist, these can be tough issues.   I know free use was made with things in mind like parody, news reporting and commentary, and the closest mine comes to is commentary, but it's not quite the same.
  6. ShadowStarshine

    Mock ups and copyright

    I think you're confusing what I said about "going public" and "posting in a public space". I'm stating a difference, if you care to see it. Yes, I agree, there is risk. A potential for harm is possible, but extremely minimal.
  7. ShadowStarshine

    Mock ups and copyright

      It may seem slightly contradictory Tom, but it's not really. By going public, I mean the act of attempting to reach a wide audience and gain recognition for my game. Things like, showing other people's work and claiming "This is my game!". Posting on a forum for game developers to ask opinion doesn't seem quite the same as that.   @Frob   I agree with everything you've said, it does seem to only be slightly on the wrong side. Still, is it worth it? And it seems like such an easy slippery slope too, asking for opinion can easily lead to gaining interest which is basically promoting. At that point, I'll be generating potential future revenue for something I didn't make.
  8. ShadowStarshine

    Mock ups and copyright

    I agree, layout can be done in boxes, but layout is only a part of what images can convey. Questions such as "Does an icon this size look legible in this layout" requires an image. But I think I'll take your advice and find some free images to replace the ones I have to use outside of internal use.
  9. ShadowStarshine

    Mock ups and copyright

    Hey everyone,   I'm currently working on a turn based strategy game as a team of me (a designer) and a programmer. We have no artist at the moment. I have been making a mock up for a User Interface which uses copyrighted images from 25+ sources photoshopped together (mostly icons and UI boxes). I want to use this internally on the team as a way to judge layout, image size and readability and determining the theme we need. I don't want to keep any of the images and want the entire thing replaced before going public with the project.   My question is, can I use these mock ups to post on sites such as GameDev to garner feedback about layout, theme and clarity? Does a disclaimer stating that I don't own these images or have any intention of using them for anything commercial do anything? Can it be used to generate interest in the project?
  10. So I recently started a Hobbyist Project on Game dev, to turn a project I've already created into a video game. I've recently hired a programmer I think looks promising and we are getting to work on the project. I don't expect profits and my main goal is to complete the project, but just in case I figured I should start a contract between us.   I know it's a good idea to just get a lawyer, but for a project that I have no *expectations* of making money, I'd like to keep the costs down. Someone suggest I just make a contract in plain english, so I did, I'm wondering if anyone here can critique it or offer advice. One possible complication is that I am in Canada and my programmer is in Saudi Arabia.   The basic thing I'm trying to get across is:   1) I still own the rights, including whatever he makes 2) We both get paid if the game makes money 3) It lasts for 5 years.   Anyways, here it is:   --------------------------------------------------   This Profit Sharing Agreement is entered into as of (Date) by (My Name) located at (Address) and (Second Party), both of whom agree to be bound by this Agreement.   Whereas, (My name) has developed Wars of Keridor (“the game”) and holds ownership of all current intellectual property rights in this product, in addition to those developed by (Second Party) for the creation of the game.   (Second party) may not use works created for the game unless for a function that does not compete or hinder the sales of the game, or use its likeness in anyway.   The contract will be binding if the game is sold with coding created by efforts by (Second party). If the game is sold with no work created by (second party) the contract will be void. The contract does not apply to any derivative works, including but not limited to expansions or sequels where (second party) does not contribute additional work.   (My name) and (second party) will share profits realized from the sale of the game as follows:   % of net income will be kept by (My name) % of net income will be kept by (Second party)   (Second party) will be paid any profits realized at these times:   At the end of each month following the release and sale of the game, if the game makes $250 Canadian or more within that time period.   Otherwise, at the end of each 3 months following the release and sale of the game, if the game makes $250 Canadian or more within that time period.   Otherwise, at the end of each year following the release and sale of the game.   This profit sharing contract will become null and void at the end of 5 years of the release and sale of the game.   ------------------------------------------------------   Thoughts?
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