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Azwad-Mars

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About Azwad-Mars

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  1. Quote:Original post by serratemplar I prefer being able to interact with the work of artists, rather than simply be subjected to it. Quote:Original post by Daaark I don't think I can count too many games that I haven't considered as art. Completely agree with both of these; I also prefer interaction as opposed to observation and I also can count on one hand games that I perhaps would NOT consider to be art. (Superman 64 anyone?)
  2. Quote:Original post by aersixb9 I should note that not all paintings and sculptures are equally awesome; for every picasso, there's 500m kindergarten drawing assignments that are probably objectively not very high quality art. Then every once in a while someone makes some art that for one reason or another conveys an emotion, sentiment, statement, memory, or some other artistic, communicative, emotional, or human idea from the artist to the viewer. WARNING SPOILERS IN THIS REPLY! Its the word in bold that is probably the simplest answer to this threads question. "Objectivity". That which something conveys is completely up to whoever is viewing it; what conveys something to you might not convey anything to me; as people we have led such very different lives and thus what affects you might not necessarily affect me. For example I would hold the Kindergarten drawings as very precious things because to me they are a symbol of innocence and purity; I would not hold them in any less regard simply because they are the works of comparitively anonymous Children and not some well known artist's work hanging in Le Louvre; The fact is If I took that 500m Kindergarten drawing and hung it in Tate Modern or something similar it would then by that standard/convention become "high-brow". I think in my personal taste and opinion; Games/works that try too hard to be artistic and abstract quite often fail in being so. Take the linked example (small-worlds) I actually found that incredibly tedious, boring and it didn't invoke the slightest emotion. I can't connect with a red vertical line, just putting some pretentious quotes wont do it for me. Same thing with Braid; yes it looked nice, yes the music was nice but again; it didn't really invoke emotions it just felt like an inferior Mario clone with a bit of Prince of Persia thrown in for good measure. I accepted it at face value, I enjoyed playing it but I wouldn't play it again to re-experience emotions, Braid tried too hard to be artsy and in doing so I feel it failed to connect to players emotions. Resident Evil once upon a time made people feel genuinely anxious; Silent Hill invoked feelings of horror; Many of the Final Fantasies invoked feelings of injustice and disdain for the villains; that's what made it so satisfying to finally kick Kefka/Sephiroth/Sin's Ass; When you saw what Ganon did to Hyrule in OOT there was nothing more you wanted to do then stab the fat pig in the face; damn that final blow felt so gooood! When certain people died in Cave Story I genuinely felt hatrid and when I got to Gary Oak in Pokemon Blue it was all I wanted to do to boot him out one more time, who DIDN'T want to destroy Giygas in Earthbound, And how many people wanted to bring Damon Gant/Von Karma/ Dahlia/Kristoph Gavin to Justice?. None of these games tried that hard to be abstract or strange or artistic but the emotions they invoked in conjunction with memorable characters/music/visuals/mehcanics and literature turned what could have been regular, casual games into cult classics. I think the problem people have nowadays is that they think because something is mainstream or 'popular' that it ceases to be artistic; Well I'm sorry but try saying that to the Millions of people who adore "masters" such as Picasso, Rembrandt, Da Vinci.
  3. Before I reply with this let me state that I ripped the definitions for the word art straight from the internets, behold my formidable skill in copy and paste. art 1 n. 1. Human effort to imitate, supplement, alter, or counteract the work of nature. 2. a. The conscious production or arrangement of sounds, colors, forms, movements or other elements in a manner that affects the sense of beauty, specifically the production of the beautiful in a graphic or plastic medium. b. The study of these activities. c. The product of these activities; human works of beauty considered as a group. 3. High quality of conception or execution, as found in works of beauty; aesthetic value. 4. A field or category of art, such as music, ballet, or literature. 5. A nonscientific branch of learning; one of the liberal arts. 6. a. A system of principles and methods employed in the performance of a set of activities: the art of building. b. A trade or craft that applies such a system of principles and methods: the art of the lexicographer. 7. a. Skill that is attained by study, practice, or observation: the art of the baker; the blacksmith's art. b. Skill arising from the exercise of intuitive faculties: "Self-criticism is an art not many are qualified to practice" (Joyce Carol Oates). 8. a. arts Artful devices, stratagems, and tricks. b. Artful contrivance; cunning. 9. Printing Illustrative material. Are games art? There are a few definitions in there that I would say succinctly describe many games to me (including Tetris; in it's simplicity it is art). But to be honest I don't care about "high brow" "low brow" arguments; I enjoy playing games, I enjoy making games and I appreciate the value of such things that are composed often of concepts plucked from the deepest recesses of the human psyche; the ability to make a world or devise such concepts is what to me makes games so interesting and admirable. Even those that are considered to be lacklustre whether it be due to poor gameplay/plot/aesthetics. It still took a varying degree of time and human intelligence to create which is what at a base level I consider all forms of "art" to be; A celebration of "human" intelligence; that thing that seperates us from all other animals on the planet. So in conclusion; yes I do believe games are art; not just particular games but every game ever conceptualised/constructed (yes...even Cheetahmen II) furthermore not only are games as a collective whole an art form but they are further composed of many other forms of art; the visual, audio, literary and mechanical (Cheetahmen II was pretty bad but from what I remember it had a pretty amazing piece of music for a level theme) there are far better looking games around now but people still talk about Ocarina of Time for its mechanical execution, deep plot and amazing soundtrack.
  4. Virtual pets?

    Oh, good point made there; I definetly don't think there should be a permanent death looming overhead; in my opinion that's too much; a simple penalty is enough like lowering happiness/some other stat.
  5. Virtual pets?

    This is actually a fairly widely discussed topic on these forums; In addition to the two (excellent) PS1 games proposed by S&S, the PS1 actually had a plethora of amazing/excellent monster sim/breeding type games as well as the Gameboy/color. some of my favourites are: Jade Coccoon series Again in the original PS1 game; breeding actually produced some radically different looking monsters that were Hybrids of the creatures used to make them; something that to my knowledge has not yet been repeated. Excellent game dynamics. Monster Rancher/Farm series I love the designs of monsters in this game and the breeding system is dynamic particularly in terms of aesthetic outcomes (plant and tiger produces a tiger with plant features etc.) Dragon Quest Monster series particularly the first one on the Gameboy Color; it was again another Rogue type with random generated oveworlds/gates; i find these two styles of games actually work quite well together. Digimon World series; some excellent systems in place for training monsters themselves; my favourite is Digimon World 3; it has a certain charm to it. Digimon V Pet: these made Tamagotchi and even the Pokewalker look like feeble toys; so simple yet highly addicitve. obviously Pokemon is up there; but we all know of that and how successful it has been; i'm not a fan of the breeding; its pretty boring; affecting the stats is nice and all but you can achieve any new looking pokemon or hybrids which I think is a bit of a shame; A dragon type with Salamence and Tyranitar features would be pretty immense. For me it's all about looks and numbers give me dynamic changes and lots of nice states to beef up and I'm happy. I am also in the proccess of Designing and developing a relatively simple monster sim style app with retro graphics.
  6. Make these games?

    Why don't people stop paying so much attention to graphics and start paying more attention to gameplay? Case in point: Final Fantasy XIII; looks pretty; but it's about as enjoyable an experience as proding an ice pick through ones testicles.
  7. Do avatars "have" to move?

    I think what I may do is start off simple; using blur effects; tweens and paths to animate; for example having the avatar shake when being hit or blurring when moving forward to attack and in addition have these simple animations accompanied by pokemon style attack animations for each individual skill/different attack as well as emoticons to convey emotions. If it is done right it should turn out pretty well. The reason for this is right now I have 40 different "classes" if you will each with a static pose; and I'm planning to give each a unique custom item set/equip set that IS visible so doing even 4 different animation poses for each would be quite a daunting proposition for me as I am also coding. Maybe when/if the game takes off I can then hire additional animators/artists to animate existing sprites and create new ones but right now it's not a realistic prospect. For a relatively simple game there is a hell of a lot of work already going into it; I've spent at least 10 hours a day for the last 5 days just spriting; there's a lot of content and I'm trying to keep it all consistent. I'm still VERY interested in other methods so if anyone has more to share; please feel free. I have a few things in mind these being; a. what is aesthetically pleasing b. what is realistic in terms of manpower c. what is suitable for purpose
  8. Do avatars "have" to move?

    Sorry for the late reply; have been very busy. I would love to hear the results of your research; very kind of you to offer.
  9. Do avatars "have" to move?

    I had a search and it seems they use some sort of blur; in fact the animations remind me a little of those used in Unlimited Saga on the playstation 2. I wouldn't know how to go about searching for exactly how they do this though; all I can do is observe and maybe try and replicate the technique. I also should have mentioned that in contrast to zOMG/Gaia the battle system I have planned is turn based and not real time. But possibly a system that is visually similar to zOMg/Unlimited saga might be even more befitting/usable in a turn based context. using a blur and some simple frames of animation may indeed work as all I would have to do is make the first masked item (for example a helmet) and then use some form of blurring/skewing in illustrator. before masking this over the comparitive animations for the base avatar itself. thanks for the reply.
  10. What is missing in RPGs today?

    On the Contrary; I LOVE stats; I love all the number crunching and all the intricate detailed info on equipment. I love exp bars and grinding and looting. I really just enjoy it, but in addition to this I also love an immersive world with folklore and mythology; Ragnarok Online is a favourite of mine I loved collecting the Monster cards in that game just to see the picture of the Monster; I loved looting to synth weapons/equips, I loved stacking cards/stats just to have that little bit more Attacking speed or dexterity or attacking power. But I really hated PVP; it bored me ot no end but then again competitive battling always has. one of My favourite RPG of all time is Golden Sun 1/2 I loved how psyenergy applied to both battle and the field; how it could one time be a weapon to use and at others a valuable tool in solving puzzles. I loved finding the Djinn and collecting them to make my characters stronger and summoning badass Gaia/Meteor/Thor/Boreas. I loved finding cookies/power bread/other items and using them to boost my characters stats. I even loved spending hours of my life grinding in venus lighthouse to loot the K-Sword from Fenrirs. For me it's a combination of stats/evolution/customisation/immersive world/folklore/puzzles and script/dialogue in the case of single player games. Zelda series have all of these in my opinion as did my favourite Final Fantasy (6)
  11. I was wondering about what peoples take on this would be; I am making a game in Flash (Actionscript 3)that features aspects of combat and avatar customisation; with regards to how easily I can generate content and overall performance of the game in general; having static avatars would be easier to implement and better for the performance in general; However I was wondering if in doing this I would serve to make the player less enthusiastic/interested in their avatar in general if it does not move. A moving image is often more interesting/stimulating to us; I can only think of a few different ways of coming to a reasonable compromise. 1.)making the avatars static (similarly to those in the pokemon series) but having more simple widely applicable animations for attacks/moves such as seen in pokemon platinum etc. 2.)Having fully animated avatars that are customisable in the sense you can equip something but aesthetically do not change with different equips. I.e they remain they same regardless of what they have equipped. 3.) similar ot number one but using emoticons to convey action. The reasons I am asking this are that I am currently experimenting with avatars/masking such as the different types commonly used (i.e; puppet, layered animation, 3D and sprite sheets) I'm not keen on 3D particularly for flash and I also prefer the way 2D looks for my purposes/means. Any input is greatly appreciated.
  12. Pokemon (DS) Programming

    HI Rasheed, have you given any thought to learning Actionscript 3? It is a very good introduction to object oriented programming (OOP) and it will also teach you a variety of coding habits that will be of great use in the future; it also gives you a very concise and clear way of understanding the various elements of programming itself such as statements, variables, classes and so forth. best of all; image and code are very much interlinked due to Flash's original purpose as animation software. Within weeks you can have a very solid understanding of why and how things work using mathmatics and logic. AS3 is considered more of a stepping stone and is not frequently used in commercial industries due to the nature of its processes, it is a somewhat laggy language due to the manner in which data is streamed but as a beginner language I think it is actually quite a good place to start rather than learn 5 different languages at once. Also; just as a reality check; whilst it IS possible for non-Japanese to work in Japanese game companies (I believe the majority if not all pokemon games are made in Japan) it does require considerable effort and willingness to understand their language and cultural values and you must be incredibly talented. There are several articles about this floating around the net and even on this very forum if you are willing to search and find them. It is always possible to do something; it just boils down to a few things; the first is yourself and your commitment; stay forever optimistic and...I hate to say this but luck also plays a vital role; stay positive and luck will come your way though. Good Luck in your future endeavours.
  13. I am a beginner in actionscript 3; recently been working with rather simpe things such as If/else statements, Math.round(math.random) Collisions, binding classes to symbols, properties, methods and communicating using getters and setters. Now I know the limitations and methods behind things; I would like to request assistance into how I would create a puzzle game where the user has control over the player character in 4 directions(obviously using onKeyDown functions and onKeyUp, vx/vy for all four directions). And basically the objective is for the character sprite to cover all the blue squares on the stage (turning them red in the process) without backtracking and stepping on a red square which ends the game or possibly depletes health. There would be things such as collisions (squares that cannot be traverse but must be walked around) and possibly pits (that the player has to jump over). I have been thinking and I'm worried that my deductions might be too simple? As in replacing an object (such as the tile) which would beunder the seperate public class "Tile" for example- replacing the blue square with a simple colour swap in the objects animation timeline once the player_mc has collided with it (perhaps using bitmap collisions) and then presenting an if/else statement such as if (player.hitTestObject(bluesquare)) { bluesquare.gotoAndStop(2//frame label); squareIsRed=true; } else { bluesquare.gotoAndStop (1); squareIsRed=false; } function checkGameOver():void { if (player.hitTestObject(bluesquare)&&squareIsRed=true) { endGame(); } What I am stumped on is how to allow it so the player can still stay on the bluesquare once they have walked onto it (because once they collide with it squareIsRed=true, so that the function checkGameOver is only valid after they step off the bluesquare object for the first time (so they can remain standing on it once it changes colour until they step off of it once more.) (arrows denote the direction player has to take in order to cover all blue squares. orange=collision areas/unchangeable). Thanks for any input. [Edited by - Azwad-Mars on May 20, 2010 10:15:14 AM]
  14. is there something like

    Quote:Original post by Iron Chef Carnage You ought to bottle that self-esteem of yours and sell it to fat children. ...I LoL'd...HARD! XD
  15. 2D Space Shooter! (Prototype added)

    These are nice ideas, the only thing i could suggest (though it may be overcomplicating the game) is to perhaps have a "required men" amount for the parts (like the gun turret) to operate them and so instead of perma death in the context to ships maybe the hired people would die instead and thus you would need to once again hire men to work the part which would further incur financial loss. But yeah, great ideas here that definetly leave alot of strategy in the mix.
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