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ldmn

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  1. Many thanx for both of you!     A wild, naive thought: And possibly "creating" a fake of their pictures / images - ie. copying it with minor modifs - like in paintings world, a non-original Mona Lisa, would also make someones very-very angry with me.   thanx and ave
  2. Greets.   Am I right to think, it is allowed freely to reuse games' gfx of defunct companies in my indie developments even for commercial purposes?   eg.  ancient game: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legend_of_Faerghail from publisher : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ReLINE_Software as for the Developer, I cannot find them: Developer(s) Electronic Design Hannover   ---- And here's another case, an ancient title, with an active pulisher (Electornic Arts) and developer (Interplay):
  3. Thanx frob and Ravyne!       But maybe iPhone games are not so huge, as their PC and great Console ports / originals?   Unfortunately I am not very familiar with workload estimation metrics, so I am curious why you mentioned -once 6 FTE years  ( methinks 1 person's full 6 years work, calculating 40 workhours a week) -then 30-150 FTE years?   (I just cannot see why so great differecne exists without seemingly any reason - at least for me)   Contorversial rumors I heard, saying this "porting" would really requre some divine intervention because of pure platform / hardware differences, and this would rather be a huge project, a conversion. (Also heard from a non-professional: would probably put 15-25 people on it - 2-4 designers for touchscreen-specific functionality conversion "on-paper", 8-16 programmers to port the game and 3-6 3D Model artists to adjust the models and textures if necessary.  Would take some months.)   What further pieces of info would be required? Source and destination platforms are given, and we could assume the company is using the most modern, efficient authorised Nintendo development tool. (Although I still don't know how much those NDS tools help, if they lessen coding time in C?)   I just need a magnitude estimate of people / time consumed but I think I cannot support any more info unfortunately. (I used to be a database programmer and thus being non-familiar with game / phone / console platforms and tools)   ---- Many thanx for any help!! (Sorry for my insisting upon this topic, but "solving / estimating" this issue would be a real life saver for me.)
  4. Greetings Maestros, Could u plz. help me answering these porting questions? It is a company level task for me, but I hardy find any info on them neither on stackoverflow nor tomsguide. In addition, not much further info is available for me/us about these questions either. (Some kind of widely used authorized NDS develop tools are owned by the company for sure.) 1. You have to port an existing AAA iPhone 3D game for the Nintendo DSi. List what are the 3-4 biggest challenges on the programming side. 2. If you have to port a “Assassins Creed" -like game from the iPhone to Nintendo DSi. a. How many members will you have in your team, and in what role? b. How long will this project last?   ---------- Until now I heard these answers:   1) - vram management, 512kb, manage memory banks etc. its really a different world than modern phones -2048 triangles rendering limit ( i dont remember exactly ) - but the ds can only draw a fixed number of triangles, so if your source game is not tailored that way, you can run into troubles   - Very strict polygon limit - No shaders - Not much memory - Impact of extra screen on HUD design and controls - No multi-touch - No floating point unit - Limited CPU power   2) a very rough estimate gut-feeling : 4 coders, 3 artists, 1 designer, 1 producer = 9 people * ~9 months.   -------------------   Could u further elaborate or confirm these answers? Many thanx for any help.  It would be quite important for me.   Good-Byte.
  5. ..Searching through the ancient ruins, suddenly the fighter-mage Sharpe found and opened the chest of basic C# knowledge !... I do not wanna be too sentimental, but thy program with the Character Sheet opens way to some great memories. There was a time, some 20 years ago, when the writer Livingstone's books (translated even to our rare language) were a big hit, they were the single-player, non-computer RPG, "page switcher" book series, where these fine character sheets were introduced to the great public! O, funny times these were. Now I see your program's genre from an other, more valuable, relevant aspect, which may really be very enjoyable - if "equipped" with also some great strory telling. These skills together in one person are a rare talent I think, but hope, you will do some great achievement and will introduce us your "masterpiece", when finished, - even if its whole life-cycle will not be presented to us through the forums. Fare thee long and well!
  6. [url="http://inventwithpython.com/"]free ebook[/url] diz is a pretty kewl ebook!
  7. [color="#2B3730"]Aye, follow [b]vharishankar's [/b]pieces of advice, IMHO it seems to be quite a business-like approach, suitable even for larger projects, where first the skeleton is implemented and details come after.[/color] [color="#2B3730"]What [b]DaveMS [/b]said is really interesting for me, ending up with so much design work, that motivation flies away...[/color][img]http://public.gamedev.net/public/style_emoticons/default/ohmy.gif[/img] But the contrary is also true in real-world projects: insufficient design and/ or early implementation mistakes can lead to a super-huge unstable, unimproveable Code mass, which may be running, but also has some unforseen "features". This is how the game-maker tool [url="http://www.scirra.com/"]Scirra's[/url] Construct Classic turned out to be, that's why they now need to code Construct 2 from scratch. My experience comes. My last summer was spent with a 2d platformer creation and also Python, Pygame learning. The project, possibly similar to yours, was not a big one. I had no planing in mind, just started with moving sprites, then added detectable terrain (platforms), some stone-age level "pathfinding", some collision detection, and so on. One step will invoke the other, it is that easy when dealing with such a small-scale project. This really hadn't required any plan to worry about! I rewrote the OOP structure 1-2 times, but that was part of the learning, just lack of practice, which you still can't plan before with small experience. [b]so just do it! It's the funny learning time![/b]
  8. Great to see an RPG with some cute GFX! This reminds me of the oldies like the Ultima series, - although I used to be in the other camp, the ones involved with the Bard's Tale series. Turn-based combat rulez! I can't give you any fine advice unfortunately, but encourage you to finish it someday, and keep us informed.
  9. Greetings Sharpe! Welcome to the forums! I am also a -to certain extent- aged hobbyist developer, from the other side of the Atlantic, liking RPGs and Python. Old-timer RPGs rock! Nice that there are people trying to reimplement those games even nowadays! I haven't played with an exact roguelike, but similar ones I enjoyed from the 80s. Perhaps you remember [url="http://www.bardstaleonline.com/BT1/"]The Bard's Tale series[/url] from those times, I think these may be called the next stage of pure ASCII roguelikes, or am I wrong? Even today I have a savegame from this series, and sometimes I do some progress through the dark dungeons of Skara Brae. Unfortunately not having any technical advice to you in thy RPG game programming endeavour as I have only created a simple platformer - a [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lode_Runner"]Lode Runner[/url] clone - in Python. Pygame is very good for arcade games, too, so I would consider using some graphics instead of ASCII in your game. However I would suggest some Python books, which I found most entertaining and useful in learning, both are available as free pdf downloads: [url="http://inventwithpython.com/"]Invent your own computer games with Python[/url] and [url="http://greenteapress.com/thinkpython/thinkpython.html"]Think like a computer scientist[/url] Happy coding, learning! Keep us / me informed about your project.
  10. I liked these books very much: [url="http://www.amazon.com/Microsoft-C-Programming-Absolute-Beginner/dp/1931841160"]My link[/url] [url="http://www.amazon.com/3-0-Beginners-Guide-Herbert-Schildt/dp/0071588302/ref=dp_ob_title_bk"]My link[/url] Very logically buit chapters, c# examples are games (in one of them), all detailed in an easily understandable way. Do not copy the C# examples, use them only for controlling your work. Don't be afraid of their age, because C# 4.0 new features -not so many - can be learnt later.
  11. Greetings to the Forumers. Having only non-PC professional programming experience, I'm at the beginning of a new route, and I'd be curious to know what PC language(s) do you think are worthy to learn nowadays for enhancing career prospects. Thus, for which languages are the highest the job market demand. For this some considerations come into my mind, such as, which languages are going to have a possibly long-term reign, and which are the ones that will be more and more neglected. Also, for game programming at the industry or as an indie, what are your votes on languages? I have found some [url="http://www.google.com/cse?cx=002683415331144861350%3Atsq8didf9x0&q=programming+language+for+career&ie=utf-8&sa=Search"]Google hits[/url] on the topic, but also would like to hear your thougts. Thanx. Bye.
  12. Greetings to thee at the forums. Can only second it. Talent, enthusiasm is more important than long education. Btw, an engineer mindset is very near to the program solving tasks needed in this field. Also there is a more designer-like route,too, which brings reward sooner: the tools Construct and Game Maker and Unity. The programmers route is perhaps more fun to go, and a more sellable skill. As for languages, Python is too easy for a math-trained mind, and has not so many perspectives, rather I recommend C#.
  13. Immense info has been given, now take the time to digest it, to be able to ask appropriate questions. use the *Like this buttons* at posts if feeling content, use google for further search
  14. for the very young, impatient and hopeful: try tools first and not languages try -Game Maker -Construct
  15. Thank thee Rip-off, hope I will understand one day... other fine examples and info from msdn: [url="http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/s6938f28.aspx"]http://msdn.microsof...y/s6938f28.aspx[/url]