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gezegond

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About gezegond

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  1. gezegond

    You Aren

    No matter how much you think it through, still the element of luck plays a very important role, specially on the internet. Luck might be less of a factor IRL, but online with tools that automate everything, people are bombarded with "stuff", and a lot of time all it takes for one to be noticed is to have somebody just checking them out on coincidence.   Consider this very article as an example: I know your game now because of this article, but I was redirected here from Gamedev.net's facebook page, and my facebook is literally bombarded with posts. If I logged in a minute early or a minute late, I wouldn't have seen the post, I wouldn't have read this article, I wouldn't have known about your game.   When you pay people or otherwise use your luck to get your exposure and still fail (like that game did), then there IS something you could've done to prevent it. Add a unique "wow" factor and make sure people immediately associate it with your game for instance (something that game didn't do).   Also if we're talking about that air whatever game that failed to get sales, I still think an important reason was the graphic style that looked like mobile games. I personally hate that style, and don't know anyone who is a PC Gamer playing on steam to consider it a plus. Maybe not a deal breaker for some, but it certainly wasn't as appealing as the devs thought and surely people wouldn't buy that game just because they got attracted to its graphic style.   I have the feeling they learned some stuff for mobile and then just decided to apply it to PC and games market doesn't quite work that way, you have to know your audience. There is a bit of advice when it comes to writing, and that is "write for someone you know". It ensures your article or book has some kind of purpose, even if it's just for a single person. I think a similar advice could be said about games: "Make it for someone you know."
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