Ukrzuel

Members
  • Content count

    15
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

101 Neutral

About Ukrzuel

  • Rank
    Member
  1. Jumping back into the fray!

    So I'm thinking, after all these years... why not get back into development, and not for profit, but for the fun of it! My only problem is that I really don't understand where the market is right now in terms of games. I'm use to C++ and some C# with XNA, but in all honesty, would web based game development suit me better if I'm looking to spread them across a wider audience? I'm well aware of JAVA, Flash, Shockwave, but now they have Silver Light, I believe it's called... Is going going JAVA the way to go? Or is there a new tool people are using now for development? I'm use to making engines, and level editors mainly in C++, so my experience is widely in making tools to make the games. Now I'm just wanting to make games for fun, just lost on whats the best way to start again? I know friends think I should just get back into C++ with my code base at hand, but I've been also told the web for games is the future, not stand alone applications.
  2. Profits vs Time Investment in Game Dev

    Not sure where all the "rich" talk comes from. Making $20,000 a year on games is not getting rich. The amount of hard work put into programming, art, music, and design is worth something is it not? Just because I love my day job doesn't mean I would go there for $5 an hour. People who're business minded should be able to relate. The eBay mentality of selling games for next to nothing, has hurt all developers. Why shouldn't we get paid for our hard work? But then again, if you would go to your day job for next to nothing because you enjoy it, I hope you can still pay your bills. I'm not asking game programmers who just make games only to release to boast about their accomplishments, and gain status. I'm asking business minded people. If everything in life was low balled, the wages for the people producing the low balled products would never increase, and we would all be living off crackers and water.
  3. I wanted to create a topic that's directly to the point. Making a game to sell for $1.00 - $5.00 appears to be a very sad reality in today's game market. I've been programming for over ten years as a hobbyist, and I'm not sure if this is even worth pursuing anymore. I wouldn't mind selling a few games, however it appears people have low balled the value of games, thus killing the money potential for all developers. I'm looking for responses from people who've successfully sold their own games. I'm finding it extremely hard to believe the time investment is worth the $40.00 I can make from 40 sales before a better game hits the spot light. I'm also looking for people who've branded themselves first, not people making money off some ads or sponsorship to share their experiences. I just find it really sad how anyone can expect to work months or even years on a project, to receive $2.00 for a good quality, fun and unique game. Any other developers find this a sad truth, and very depressing?
  4. Color issues per Monitors

    I'm not sure if any other artists have found this being a big issue. I use dual monitors at home, my samsung sync master has more vivide colors, my other monitor seems more closer to the same colors on my iphone and other hand held devices. Then my laptop is somewhat in between. This is making it very hard to determine which screen to use when making graphics. Any advice from those who've dealt with this problem before?
  5. Managed C++ for game tools?

    Thanks Felix, I was reading a bit on QPainter, wasn't sure how powerful it was going to be. Mind you when I program anything from a game to an editor, I make sure it only draws what you can see. However having a 2000x500 buffer to draw on might be too big for some software rendering. I could just make different buffers for every few screen width/height if I had to. Edit: I was just looking on the SFML website: http://www.sfml-dev.org/tutorials/1.6/graphics-qt.php Pretty easy setup with QT!
  6. Managed C++ for game tools?

    Alrighty, so my options look like: 1. C# Forms with embed XNA (Which I've done before) 2. QT using OpenGL/Direct X for displaying graphics 3. C++ Using SDL, ect... To make the editor from scratch. (I've done this a few times, mind you making the GUI was a pain in the butt) After my day at the office I will research more into QT and see if this will be practical. Thanks again.
  7. Managed C++ for game tools?

    [quote name='Serapth' timestamp='1305610810' post='4811792'] You do realize that absolutely none of those technologies are exclusively tied to C++, right? OpenGL, DirectX, wxWidgets, all of the have C# bindings available. I will agree with the decision you are coming to 100% though, using C++ for tools is mostly a dumb thing to do, especially if your end result is a language independent file. [/quote] You bet, they're just APIs. I mean I could honestly make a level editor with C++ and say SDL or SFML, using a custom gui I'll create like I've done in the past. However, it takes a long time to get this done, but once complete it's working and good to go, and not too hard to make improvements. What I'm attempting at doing here is moving with the times. C++ has been my language of choice for a long time, however RAD will save me a ton of time in the future. I'm planning a lot of new projects in the coming years, and will be offering some services for others, therefore I'm trying to pick the right route for tools development now. I don't believe I will ever sway away from c++ for many more decades to come, unless it becomes obsolete with some crazy new technolgoy and is unusable (which I doubt will happen in half my life time).
  8. Managed C++ for game tools?

    [quote name='FelixK15' timestamp='1305627814' post='4811866'] If you love C++ you should definitely stick with Qt. I made a leveleditor myself with Qt and I have to say that it worked pretty good. What you also should not overlook is that Qt has one of the best documentations I've ever seen. [/quote] What does QT use for rendering graphics to the screen? For example, if I clicked at (16, 32) on a bitmap, could I have a graphic drawn at that location. This is pretty much all I need, which is easy to do in GDI+ but very slow at the moment. I just need a buffer pretty much and I'll use my normal way of exporting locations for objects, ect... plus an array for the tile locations. I'll check out the QT website some more, I did watch some youtube videos and must same I'm impressed with how fast I had seen a window with buttons and text boxes up and running.
  9. Managed C++ for game tools?

    Umm sorry for my constant questions. I know I can get XNA in a Form window in less than 10 minutes and have a map able editor in about 30 minutes with just tiling to a grid (Mid you the code would be messy). I'm finding maybe using C++ will just cause more of a headache than needed for tools development. I have no problem using C++ for the engine side of things, maybe I should just stop being so one sided to just C++ and jump on board to a RAD language for my tools. I don't really need to use C++ for the tools because I'm outputting all of the data in files which will be loaded into the engine and put to work. Heck, I could use BASIC and still accomplish the same task. My main issue is that GDI+ is usually too slow. I require some heavy graphic drawing in my editor, this is why I was thinking of XNA. The one thing I hated about programming was the endless options, it's not like breathing. If I find myself unable to leave c++, I guess wxWidgets with OpenGL would be an option.
  10. Managed C++ for game tools?

    Thanks Exoity, what I some what dislike is, spending hours absorbed in c++ where I'm in a very protective mind set for how I code, then going into C# where I'm not required to be as watchful, sometimes causes me to loose that focus when I go back into c++. I'm not sure if this makes any sense or not? I can tend to get a bit lazy when working in c# because I know I can get away with it, but when I go back to c++ I don't want to be in that same mind set. Considering I will be spending a good chunk of time with tools and my engine, I was trying to stay with just c++ if I could, taking advantage of .net forms.
  11. Managed C++ for game tools?

    Thanks for all the advice. I know when I did C# before with my Editors, I would embed XNA into my form so I could tile, drag and drop, plus add collision areas, ect... If I end up using C#, will I be stuck with XNA? I could use slimDX, however I've never used Slim before. I still think GDI+ would be too slow, not to mention dragging and dropping enemies on the screen would be a nightmare.
  12. Managed C++ for game tools?

    I do agree that when I used C#, heck even in my BASIC days GUI applications were a lot less time consuming than C++. I looked at QT briefly, it does appear to do everything I need, heck I remember making an active toolkit with C# using XNA that had a real run time for maps. Was a lot of fun! Was there a reason Managed C++ is a bad idea for toolkits? I wouldn't touch managed C++ with a flag poll for games though since I've never really jumped on board for .net games; however my tools are running on Windows 7. If I wasn't so keen on using just C++ and could break this bad habit, I would just use C# due to it's RAD Development. QT does appear interesting, that's for sure!
  13. Managed C++ for game tools?

    Thanks, I'll look into QT. I've heard about QT countless times, even had the page bookmarked, never really went there though. I guess I really should be checking this out. Thanks again.
  14. Managed C++ for game tools?

    Hello everyone, As most other C++ programmers who have been around for awhile, know that making tools with C++ with GUI from the ground up can be a big pain in the butt sometimes (unless you have a lot of reusable code from past projects), not to mention taking a huge amount of time. I'm not interested in using MFC for obvious reasons. I've gotten to the point where I really like C++ and could not see myself fully using C# for tool kits anymore. So my question is, will going into Managed C++ just for Level Editors and other tools be wise? How easy will it be to grasp the concepts to setup my tools? (I've never even looked at C++.net to be honest). I've used C# for a level editor that exports files for my Engine, however I would rather just stay with C++ instead of swapping back and forth. I've had a hard time moving on to programming a project using several languages, even though I've learned enough C# to make a game in that language. Do you recommend C++.net for tool sets? Or should I just stay with C#? I'm trying to end the habit of making tools using APIs like SDL to save time. NOTE: This topic is not a (VS) topic for C++ vs C#. It's a topic to decide which will get results faster for building tool kits. I've invested enough time through the years in C++ to keep this as my language of choice.
  15. Good afternoon everyone, I've taken some time away from programming in general, but would like to hop on board once again. My past experiences with programming games has been largely with the C family of languages. That being, C/C++/C#. I have programmed a lot for Windows in the past, but in this new day and age I would like to move up into browser based programming either using Java or Flash. I've used Allegro, SDL, XNA with C# for my games in the past. So my question starts like many others before me, which holds the most power and long term advantages, Java or Flash? I'm looking to stay with 2D programming for at least a year, then move onto 3D development. I'm not sure if any other languages exist for browsers. I'm not looking for the "easier" one out of the two, or any engines or game makers, as I do have a lot of years put into the C family, learning Java or Flash (Action Script) shouldn't be too difficult. I'm looking for the long term advantages to sticking with one of the two options. Networking would also be a factor later down the road, but not at this point in time. Thank you.