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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Arcand

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  1. yes, but the idea is to connect the people, sorting all the resources first into artist then in to types and making it so artists wanting there name out can safely say they made a major commitment, having say a set of aliens in an indie game rather than a single alien. My thought is it would make the end result more of a portfolio addition...
  2. So my idea is pretty simple on the outside, I want to start a website that can connect the people who make resources for games - models, textures, sound files, etc. with the growing number of people that are trying to make there own indie game. Where it gets confusing is the thought that puts it all together - I would have a lawyer friend of mine write up a legal document saying that if the indie developers dont put the artists name in the credits, they would get fined some obscene amount of money for plagiarism, there-by making the enticement for the artists to be getting there name as an independent artist - and there work - deeper in the community. The thought is to remove the concept of money so that indie developers can focus more on the game they are making and a bit less on the costs.   This is, however, an afterthought I had over the past few weeks and I havn't thought out much of it. Im under the impression I would have to go to the kick-starter type websites to fund its creation and the (severely reduced) lawyer fee for the legal stuff, and the continuing funding I havn't thought out yet passed the point of possibly asking for donations for the servers, etc.   Please share what ever this message has brought up in your thoughts, I will be checking this forum and possibly others like it all day.   Alexander Arcand.
  3. :) glad I asked. Thank you very much
  4. I just found an answer,   vector<vector<string>> room[10];   and supposudly to access it one would use sub-brackets such as   room[4].resize(9);   to make the fourth room a size of 9 or simply   room.resize(4); to make four rooms.   Confirmation would be great :)
  5. can you encapsulate a vector inside another vector? im trying to make five "rooms" each with nine "sections", that being the 8 directions and the center, but I just realized that I have no idea if I actually can, and if so, how :-), I want to be able to access and modify the strings within the room(section) easily.   I hope this makes sense, I am new to programming.   thx.
  6. in this code segment im getting an invalid conversion error on everything from ships[1][1] to ships[5][1]... why is this? [CODE] using namespace std; #include <iostream> #include <string> int main() { const int CLASS = 6; const int NAME = 15; char ships[CLASS][NAME]; ships[1][1] = "Frigate"; ships[2][1] = "Destroyer"; ships[3][1] = "Cruiser"; ships[4][1] = "Battleshop"; ships[5][1] = "Dreadnaught"; cout << "Ship types as follows:\n"; cout << ships[1] << endl << ships[2] << endl << ships[3] << endl << ships[4] << endl << ships[5] << endl; cin.get(); return 0; } [/CODE]
  7. I just typed loose. *brain squiggles*
  8. yea, all those horrible people that loose there jobs and need to torrent stuff to get them should be shot... *eyeroll* thx for the tips everyone
  9. OK so, ive been wanting to make my own mini games for a while, about a year or so back I tried programming, decided to do the opposite and tried out maya (3d graphics), now im back to wanting to try programming again. Im planning on starting at the bottom, so "its gonna be a while" responses are unnecessary ALTHOUGH I would much appreciate some resources such as books that I could torre-*ahem* I mean purchase and such as so fourth! thanks!
  10. is there a difference? a friend wants to run me through the basics of opengl but hes talking about doing it in Qt creator where many functions are labeled with a "q", something he says means its implemented into qtcreator... should I bite the bullet and get Qt creator? is there really a big difference between the two?
  11. thank you everyone for your responces, they have helped a lot. I will reiderate, although I got the answer I needed... its easier when you have something to apply it to. The class I was taking was litterally called pre-college level ath... I was put it preatty near the end and never really had to much trouble understanding the concepts, I had trouble with the underlying calculations of application, the actual multiplucation/division at the root of it over again until, yes, my eyes bled. professionally im a cook. I work part time in a community kitchen and part time at a small cafe'/resturaunt and I enjoy my job almost to much... so yes, this is a hobby, and its a hobby I just started working on. what brought me to this question was my tutor running me through something called the "8 queens" problem, mabey some of you know of it, but the math really fuggered with my brain that night I will learn what I need to, as I need to, no matter what, because games are my passion and I've wanted to make them since I first played mech warrior mercinaries and battlezone 1 (o the days =+) ) thank you, you'll be seeing more of me I promise!
  12. Im not so hot at math, in fact I took a refresher course in college to get my math skills up and didnt do so well at all, so im just wondering, how much can I do in game programming with a not to hot math knowlege? am I doing something here that is beyond me, seeing as math is something im not to hot at? I am really worried about this, as right now my math skills are fine but ive only been programming for a week or two :-) Please advise! I am really into this so far, so I am pleading to the gods that I wont run in to something I cant get help with through either a calculator or another programmer :S
  13. so every once in a while you hear something about indie games having a few hubs here and there where you can find lists of games made by the players, for the players, and I was wondering, where might I find such a list?
  14. I feel I need to re-iterate. im looking for an engine that will give me libraries and header files in for C++ that I can play with. Please advise.