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Brain

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Blog Comments posted by Brain


  1. This is really unlucky, and i feel for you.

    Hopefully though its also an opportunity. I recommend installing a good cloud based backup software such as crashplan pro which is $10 a month per machine, with unlimited storage space.

    I also recommend using git or perforce for your version control, but store graphical assets separately if you go with git, as git isn't very good at storing large binary blobs unless you use for example the git LFS addon.

    I went through the same experience as you a few years ago when my phone was stolen and i'd been a stand-out against cloud software, cloud storage, and backing up my photos to the internet, until this happened. As part of the experience i re-thought my entire backup strategy and now have backups of my backups.

    MOST IMPORTANTLY THOUGH, test your backup and restore process regularly. Many people set up a backup, then leave it and assume that's it. If you don't know you can restore from it, you may be wasting time, resources and money. Have a schedule, and test a restore of a simple file, e.g. an image or a model, every 6 months at least. Pick that file at random, and know what you expect back. If anything doesn't work, make sure it's fixed before you continue with it!

    Good luck and hope you get everything back how it was soon!


  2. 4 hours ago, lawnjelly said:

    In my day, we'd have modelled that container as 3 quads, showing a different set according to the viewing direction. Kids today have it so easy.

    Good work though! :D 

    nah thats nothing. You youngsters don't know now't.

    When i was but knee high to a spectrum 48k, we would draw all 3 sides as pixel art on an 8 colour palletized display at 160x80 pixels resolution, and use pallet tricks to hide and show the sides, you would have three possible views and that was all you got. you were grateful to have three views and the loading time was about ten minutes of tapes whirring and making a god-awful racket!

    You youngin's are so spoiled! Get off my lawn!


  3. Quote
    • Zombie Hatch: it is formed by zombie tombs (remember: we are still thinking on the zombie idea and what kind of creature could fit better in the story). If you destroy the zombie hatch, no more zombies will appear from this area.

    I think this would work better as a robot apocalypse. The blockchainZ ammo is a special ammo containing EMP nanites and a virus that disables the robot which was developed in short supply just before the world ended. The facilities to make it lost, what's left is all there is. The zombie hatchery could become a machine factory, automated production of robots, destroying it doing the same but also allowing you to scavenge tech resources for your settlement.

    What do you think?


  4. 9 minutes ago, Awoken said:

    This is cool, brilliant by the way capitalising on the 4th of July.

    Thanks!

    I was in two minds as to if i should release a game on a big national public holiday, I had a feeling that people would be too busy with family stuff etc to be playing games. Then I thought about it some more and thought "i'll just extend the sales push over more than one day"?

    I don't really know 4th July holiday that well though, being British, so if anyone here can advise as to if this is a smart move or a really foolish one, please let me know!!!


  5. i like what im seeing. The graphics kind of remind me of Gauntlet.

    Out of curiosity how do you plan to generate the dungeons? Do you plan to use a PRNG to determine the entire dungeon from a seed value, then save that seed value to a save game file?


  6. As a quick hack, i would try something like separating the image into many different quads, calculating the average, minimum and maximum colour values of each quad, and storing those as my image thumbprint.

    Comparing a second image, you could determine if they were somewhat alike if the averages, minimums and maximums of the second image fell in the range of those of the first, for over a set percentage of the quads, e.g. 75% of the quads had an average within acceptable "distance" of the first image's thumbprint.

    Kind of like edit distance, but for images.

    This is definitely a solved problem as Google and TinEye are doing it already, but as to how they do it? That's beyond my knowledge and I tend to go for quick hacks like this that work rather than dive into deep complex maths to solve a problem.


  7. This is great!

    I like how poisonous water has little skull and crossbones coming out of it for UX. That's a great idea!

    You know what would be cool? If an enemy when pushed off a ledge had a chance to grip the edge of the ledge with both hands, action movie style and start to pull themselves back up again, but only if they have enough health to hold on and only if the velocity is low enough to grab the edge?

    I like what im seeing!


  8. Well, i would keep it simple.

    If you look at most title screens they have a 'zen' look of simplicity about them that draws the eye to the 'start' or 'continue' option, generally you can start the game just by pressing the start button or enter key.

    For example look at this screen for skyrim:

    Apart from the logo and smoke and music, it's as simple as you can get.

    You'd only need two, perhaps 3 options:

    • Start game
    • High scores
    • Exit game

    Note that there's a hidden reason that they ask you to press start before showing the options proper; it's simply so that the system can detect which controller the player is using. XInput and similar support up to 4 controllers, so by pressing start you explicitly confirm which one is active and in use. I didn't know this until i started looking into making XBox Live indie games on the 360 some years ago, it was part of their approval process to go live with a game. I'm not sure if it's still the case for things like ID@XBox, but still best practive even on PC.


  9. On 12/29/2018 at 3:32 PM, fleabay said:

    How can you consider yourself a lone developer when you have an entire team off dozens creating the bulk of your game engine?

    Just going back to this original comment here: when I release my game I plan to credit everyone who has authored any asset regardless of license. Even CC0/Public domain will get credit.

    Why? Because it feels to me to be the professional and nice guy thing to do.


  10. 16 minutes ago, RPTD said:

    It's not "just a subculture of people" as you claim it to be. It's certainly much less effort and engagement to copy-paste a game together instead of doing the assets, scripts, code (if required), sound, music, UI and what not else yourself (alone or with a team). Most of the time these C&P games are bad since you need to understand what you are doing. Just slapping things together is what the majority of people do but real game developers don't. That's why Unity has the negativity attached to it. That and the fact it's a horrible engine to work with. Better use UE4 or some other engine. It's cumbersome to work with too but less of a problem.

    (Bracing for fanboy down-voting... 1...2...)

    No I can’t downvote that, it’s the commonly held belief. It’s true that people do asset flip things from the unity store and just drag and drop them together, and battle through the inevitable compile errors until it builds, consider it done, and pay $100 to list it on steam. This has given unity a bad name.

    you don’t see as many of these in ue4 for two reasons: the asset store is less detailed and has less for sale and secondly the steeper learning curve makes it less simple to just bumble through the compile errors caused.

    If you’ve put effort into unique gameplay it doesn’t matter who’s assets you use - I tend to “kitbash” eg buy many assets from turbosquid on the cheap and modify them into more complex assets (see the grab claw in my game on my YouTube channel).

    People like Jim Sterling and digital homicide haven’t helped with unity’s reputation one bit.

    Again pay it no heed and make your game the best it can be...


  11. There is a subculture of people (mostly gamers and reviewers on YouTube) who might consider a unity game some kind of lesser thing, like the effort taken isn’t the same somehow. They base this opinion on seeing one too many cheap asset flips on steam green light.

    You don’t generally see the same response from developers, and fleabay certainly isn’t one of them.

    pay the real naysayers no heed and plow on your own way!


  12. This is looking good so far.

    for added challenge, how would you implement realistic bouncing of the ball at the inverse of the angle it hits a surface at, eg like a pool ball would in a game of pool?

    hint: read up on vectors and normals, this will help.

    i look forward to the next instalment!

    have fun!


  13. Hi!

     

    i did exactly the same as you, writing my game from scratch and then discovering the productivity gains of using an off the shelf engine.

    youre right in that it will help you but in my case I’m only just surpassing the progress of my best previous attempt now, several years later because often you find you don’t have the free time you once had, and secondly you have to learn the quirks of the engine you choose.

    in my case I chose unreal engine 4 and although I already felt competent in C++ and had written several large projects in modern C++ I quickly found out that unreal kind of chews up standard c++ and adds lots via macros and custom preprocessors and it’s like learning some things all over again. Standard library and STL are out, a custom template library and classes are in.

    dont underestimate the time taken to become competent in a new engine but above all good luck and have fun!

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