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Brain

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Everything posted by Brain

  1. ^^ Great advice for life as a whole, rather than just gamedev!
  2. Brain

    Game engines

    Nah, i'm fine for now, there's a whole 2gb free there 🙂 Back in the good old days, that was ten times the size of my hard disk...
  3. It's worth pointing out that github now offer free private repositories... This probably solves your problem
  4. Hi all I've produced a new trailer for my game, and although i've been working in C++ and other programming languages as a developer for many years, when it comes to video editing and production i'm still as green as they come (so be gentle!). This trailer features a lot of the newer gameplay set pieces and mechanics so gets across more the objects and things i want to convey. A few people i've let see this video say that it's a lot better paced than my previous attempts and more exciting to watch. If you could please give some of your own constructive feedback on this and potential improvements I can make to it without spending money and by doing the changes myself, I would be grateful. (I have no further budget for this apart from my time) - Thanks!
  5. Just out of curiosity, why Canada? There are many game studios worldwide that you could apply to if you're willing to relocate all that way. Is there a secondary reason you're limiting your search to just one country?
  6. Please please make this app. The problems we've had with getting kids to brush their teeth aren't trivial for some, of course kids would rather play, or do anything else! Making it a game does help. I really hope you do manage to make this, and make it a success! Good luck!
  7. This depends what your experience of programming languages is. Unity uses C#, and is generally easy to pick up if you have previous experience in programming. Unreal Engine 4 uses C++ and is generally less friendly for a beginner, but extremely powerful for those with experience. I'd recommend starting out with unity, if you have some programming experience. If you don't, just put your project on hold for a few months while you learn the basics, and believe it or not once you have the basics down you can kind of learn as you go, it will just take a lot longer (i mean a lot longer - don't expect to get this project finished within a 3 or 4 year time frame). A wise man once said it takes 10,000 hours of experience in a field to become an expert, that's 3.5 solid years of practicing your craft, including time for breaks, holidays, and assuming an 8 hour full time day. If you are doing this on the side, double that timeframe. In the end though, its not how long it takes, but the end result and the journey taken to get there right? Above all, have fun!
  8. I think when you say engine, you have a different idea of what an engine is than i do. If you mention making an engine around here, you usually mean a renderer, entity component style system perhaps, subsystems to manage audio, gameplay scripts, etc. What you're asking for are a set of components to add to an existing engine such as unreal engine or unity, that allow for creation of a game, plus the art work. That's a lot of stuff. Before you think about what language to use, consider making sure you have knowledge and experience in the tools you're going to use. If you don't yet have this experience, get some experience first otherwise what you're asking to do is akin to trying to build a skyscraper when you haven't even learned the basics of structural engineering. I'm not kidding, game development is HARD but very rewarding... Once you've done this, create a short document of 5 pages or less documenting the rules of this game, the general loop the player progresses through. e.g. "player explores, finds enemies, gets experience, levels up" or such. This is your game design document. Don't bloat it out with back story, concept art etc, these come later, or maybe you don't need them at all ever in the case of things like concept art. Consider buying existing off the shelf components to add to unity or unreal engine, and adjusting these to suit your game, never under-estimate the time this would take to do from scratch (perhaps decades). Good luck!
  9. Brain

    advice/choosing a game engine

    Out of curiosity, which languages did you program your previous two games in? It may be better if possible to expand on knowledge you already have and strengthen your existing skills.
  10. Brain

    Godot or Unity for a new game dev?

    If you know a little of C++ and C#, why not try them both out and see which you like the most? Both are very competent solutions, and have different approaches. One may resonate with you and you might use it and think "ah ha, yes, i understand and enjoy this". You may find you like both equally as much, and then you've gained a ton of knowledge. You can't really go wrong though, there is no bad choice here - both will be suitable for creating a first game.
  11. In my opinion, if you're starting out and the most important thing to you is to make a game, choose something like game maker. Why? Because if you do, you'll spend more of your time making a game than learning the ins and outs of memory management, the idiosyncrasies of some programming language, etc. In my shed, i have a toolbox. In that toolbox, i have a screwdriver that i use to screw in screws, and a hammer i use to bang nails in. I wouldn't use the screwdriver to bang in the nail. What i'm saying here is use the right tool for the job, there is a time and place for languages like LUA, C++, and friends, and the right time and place isn't the start of your journey. If you set off on a quest to immediately meet the last boss, well you aren't going to enjoy that game too much, unless you really enjoy punishment or happen to enjoy Dark Souls... Good luck on your journey ahead!
  12. I'd recommend using something like unity to do this. It comes with support for a wide range of platforms out of the box and generally performs quite well. As i understand it, you may need to purchase some extra functionality depending on how you want to handle networking, and you may need a subscription e.g. to quantum or photon, or you might be able to roll your own with a web based backend and a database, it depends on how confident you are. Don't under estimate the costs and time taken to maintain such a project after it's launched. Game updates, upgrades to the systems, security, customer support and billing can take up a huge amount of time on a project like this, and if you're going into it alone, you may be in for a bit of a shock. I have previously made a couple of web based games and these alone were a nightmare to manage. You also have to be aware of various other laws and conditions on your ability to do this, i assume you'll want to use a mobile store for payments etc, this is probably the best way to do it, you should probably speak to an accountant about properly creating a business entity such as a limited company or LLC, and make sure all your tax etc is above board and that everything is done right. I'd recommend building a small team of trusted game developers you know well, i'd estimate that with the correct level of experience a team of perhaps 3 or 4 people may be able to do this, if you contract out your art and sound, keep the assets to a bare minimum and re-use as much as possible, as often as possible. Everyone on board should be aware this will be a long term project not just in terms of the initial development, but in terms of the ongoing work afterwards. Most importantly, do you already have gameplay and mechanics down? If not, think about documenting it all in a simple game design document - don't go overboard, five pages at the very most. Some of the biggest and most successful AAA games of the past few generations had game design documents which were extremely short, as these documents are subject to change on a whim. After all that, good luck! You'll need it, but it will be worth it!
  13. Brain

    Game engines

    When you say beginner just how much of a beginner? Can you program? Which languages? If you're comfortable with C#, you'll find unity a breeze, whereas if you are comfortable with C++ and are open to new ways of doing things (e.g. visual scripting) you'd probably prefer Unreal Engine. There are many other engines out there such as Godot, most will assume a good level of familarity with a particular programming language to make some progress. My specs are similar to what you posted, and it's kind of needed for me, i tend to have lots of things open at once. By the time you've got blender, UE4, gimp, visual studio, discord, audacity and a bunch of other stuff all open at once, you'll soon fill that 16gb of ram and be wondering when you can afford to go to 32gb. Right now my game's project takes about 6.5gb of ram just to open and edit, and here's what task manager looks like for me: Also, with C++ projects, you'll find that having a solid state drive really does help (and put your project on it as well as your OS!) with build times, as despite what others say, i find that the visual C++ compiler spends a lot of time I/O bound when building large executables and libraries. Good luck and enjoy!
  14. Take a look at some tools like rpg maker and game maker. I've not used these myself, but i've been told they are very accessible and will get you into making simple games very quickly. Personally I use Unreal Engine 4, but i would definitely not recommend this for someone starting out. The vast amount of features in it and the scattered documentation make it extremely daunting even for people who've been creating games for many years. Similarly, unity is great but will assume that you already know how to program to make good use of it. I don't think it was mentioned, have you already learned any programming at all? You said you know almost nothing, is that completely nothing, or do you know the basics of variables, loops etc in one or more programming languages? Hope this helps!
  15. Brain

    New trailer feedback!

    Hi, This is a slight necro, but sorry for not replying sooner. It's an unforgiving "anti-casual" puzzle game. I had to actually look up what a zach-like meant, you mean games like spacechem right? Not quite, but yes, perhaps this needs to be made more obvious in the final trailer later this month. Thanks everyone for the feedback!
  16. Hi Everyone, Now that I've returned from Casual Connect London 2019, I can finally progress with pushing Mr Boom's Firework Factory to release. Casual Connect was extremely productive, and an extremely useful resource for getting the game polished and put in front of many eyes. There is a gallery for the photos of Casual Connect below: The main things that happened were: Over 70 people played the game, with overwhelmingly positive feedback. The game is as hard as we'd intended, but I need to review the tutorial and usability to ensure people are getting stuck in a good way with the game's difficulty curve, and not with the controls and learning what they actually need to do I managed to grow my professional network, meeting many other indie developers One of the people I met has encouraged me to get proper voice acting done for Mr Boom, so the main 'antagonist' of the game will have a voice! What worked? Actively encouraging people to come and play the game worked very well. Where most people patiently sat and waited for people to come and play their game, I was not content with this, and would stride with purpose into the walkway and try to convince people that they needed to play my game. A casual introduction of "hi, how are you?" would start a conversation which usually ended with 15 minutes of play. Having a rolling video of the game helped massively, if one person was playing, or we were busy networking, a second person could simply watch the video. Similarly, if someone did not want to play the game, but wanted to know how it worked they could simply watch the rolling gameplay video. Recording various players on my phone as they played help two ways; firstly, it allowed us to analyse their body language and expressions afterwards to determine where they were pleased, happy, frustrated, or confused. Secondly, these may be useful later in footage to promote the game, at key moments where people cheer to themselves or curse the game as they lose or win a level. Having Trello on our mobile phones allowed us to quickly make a list of observations in the background as people played. The appeal of the game was very strong, many people played until they had other places to be (e.g. they had a set of games they wanted to try out, or had to go to a talk or meeting) with the average game session lasting 15-20 minutes. I purposefully chose to take equipment to casual connect which could not edit the code and perform fixes. This forced me to ensure that the game was stable enough on the equipment to not need hotfixes at the event. We didn't want to be the ones sat trying to edit our code at the event for all to see. Reaching out to previous winners gave a whole wealth of useful advice, which we used. Thanks very much to Robert Kujawa at Neurodio for his in-depth email responses which helped tailor my approach to the conference. They produced a guide, which is now available to everyone, based on the emails they sent me. What didn't work? The tutorial was not strong enough to stand alone at the conference, Craig and I ended up becoming an interactive tutorial, with each player, explaining the controls and goals repeatedly. This soon became tiresome, but at the same time afforded the opportunity for the player to ask questions as they played. The hardware we had planned to use was not up to the task - the netbook I had ready to stream 1080P video was not up to the challenge on the day, luckily we had backup hardware. Recording people on our phones did not yield the excitement we had hoped to capture. While people got very excited to complete a level that had challenged them for ten minutes or more, they would react naturally and excitedly when we weren't recording, but if they were aware of the mobile phone recording their reactions would change, perhaps due to being uncomfortable with being recorded. What did I learn? This may be directly related to the types of professionals at the event, but we were repeatedly asked when this would be available on mobile. Due to this, I intend to look into a mobile port soon after the steam release, either porting it myself or finding a third party able to port it, such as a publisher. Once you put a game in front of real people, outside your testing team, they will uncover bugs you never dreamed possible. Amongst the positive feedback were at least two crashes to desktop, two different forms of lockups, and some weird non-game-breaking visual bugs. For the non-game-breaking bugs, usually the player did not notice as they were too deep into the gameplay and concentrating on finishing the level. The game needs more visual cues. For example ghosted crates on the exit, and above the machines, to give hints to what is going to happen next and what is expected of you: I am now starting on the list of feedback obtained from Casual Connect, so there should be another blog entry of these fixes soon. Stay tuned! If anyone has any comments or feedback as always please do leave comments below!
  17. Brain

    Mr Boom's Firework Factory

    Mr Boom's Firework Factory is a fast paced puzzle game written in Unreal Engine 4 with a combination of Blueprints and C++. Through many levels of mayhem, you'll discover the secret behind the firework factory. This game is almost ready for release, due to be released 4th July 2019.
  18. Brain

    IMG_20190528_175016.jpg

    From the album: Casual Connect London 2019/Indie Prize

    © (C) Craig Edwards, Brainbox.cc, 2019

  19. Brain

    IMG_20190528_175016.jpg

    Paulo Luis Santos - Centre Me - Right
  20. Brain

    IMG_20190528_083607.jpg

    Craig McLure (FrostyCoolSlug) being camera shy as we were setting up the showcase on the first morning.
  21. Brain

    IMG_20190528_083607.jpg

    From the album: Casual Connect London 2019/Indie Prize

    © (C) Craig Edwards, Brainbox.cc, 2019

  22. Brain

    IMG_20190528_092635.jpg

    From the album: Casual Connect London 2019/Indie Prize

    © (C) Craig Edwards, Brainbox.cc, 2019

  23. Brain

    IMG_20190528_092635.jpg

    My "booth neighbours" were Flux Games, creators of Talaka who spent quite a while trying out Mr Boom's Firework Factory.
  24. Brain

    IMG_20190528_142832.jpg

    From the album: Casual Connect London 2019/Indie Prize

    © (C) Craig Edwards, Brainbox.cc, 2019

  25. Brain

    IMG_20190528_142832.jpg

    Mr Boom's Firework Factory showcase
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