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Bartley

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  1. This is just the tester I've been using to try to come to grips with animation. Hope to integrate it with the actual game later. Just click on the black spot, then any other square. You'll notice the black spot (representing a character) jumps to the final tile, without displaying on any of the intermediaries. The plan is to get the character to move to each square (first) , then break the move from each square down into a series of smaller moves with individual animations. Here goes: This launches the program [CODE] /* * Launches Image loader */ import javax.swing.JFrame; public class ImageLauncher { public static void main(String[] args) { ImageLoader6 loader = new ImageLoader6(); loader.setTitle("Basic Image Loader"); loader.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE); } }[/CODE] This contains game logic [CODE]/* * Game logic is in this class */ import javax.swing.*; import java.awt.*; import java.awt.event.ActionListener; import java.awt.event.MouseAdapter; import java.awt.event.MouseEvent; import java.util.ArrayList; import java.util.LinkedList; import java.util.Timer; import java.util.TimerTask; import java.util.logging.Level; import java.util.logging.Logger; import javax.swing.ImageIcon; public class ImageLoader6 extends JFrame { /* INSTANCE FIELDS */ private Image sand; private Image grass; private Image character; private final int tileSize = 64; private final int WIDTH = 640; private final int HEIGHT = 640; private JPanel gamePanel; private ActionListener MouseListener; private GameBoard board; private ArrayList <Actor> actorList; private final int BOARD_WIDTH = WIDTH / tileSize; private final int BOARD_HEIGHT = HEIGHT / tileSize; java.util.Timer timer; private int selectedActorId; private boolean isActorSelected; /* CONSTRUCTOR */ public ImageLoader6() { // Initialise Instance fields board = new GameBoard(); actorList = new ArrayList <Actor> (); selectedActorId = 0; isActorSelected = false; // Add an Actor to the list actorList.add(new Actor(actorList.size(), 11, "C:\\My Folder\\Game Development\\Testing\\Graphics\\char.png")); board.setActorIdInTile(11, actorList.size()-1); add(createGamePanel()); setSize(WIDTH, HEIGHT); loadImages(); setVisible(true); repaint(); } /* METHODS */ // Loads Images public void loadImages() { sand = new ImageIcon("C:\\My Folder\\Game Development\\Testing\\Graphics\\sandTile.jpg").getImage(); grass = new ImageIcon("C:\\My Folder\\Game Development\\Testing\\Graphics\\grassTile.jpg").getImage(); } // Creates a panel to display Images public JPanel createGamePanel() { gamePanel = new JPanel(); addMouseListener(new MouseListener()); return gamePanel; } // Paints the map public void paint(Graphics g) { System.out.println("Paint Method started"); for(int i = 0 ; i < 100 ; i++) { String type = board.getTileType(i); int x = (i % 10) * 64; int y = (i /10) * 64; // Checks the tile object to determine whether it is grass or sand if(type.equalsIgnoreCase("grass")) { g.drawImage(grass, x, y, null); } else { g.drawImage(sand, x, y, null); } } // Works through the list of actors, draws them for(int j = 0 ; j < actorList.size() ; j++) { // Get Actor's position & convert to X,Y coordinates int actorPosition = actorList.get(j).getActorPosition(); int actorX = (actorPosition % 10) * tileSize; int actorY = (actorPosition / 10) * tileSize; g.drawImage(actorList.get(j).getActorImage(), actorX, actorY, null); } try { Thread.sleep(20); } catch (InterruptedException ex) { Logger.getLogger(ImageLoader6.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex); } }// End of paint() // Mouse Listener private class MouseListener extends MouseAdapter { public void mouseClicked(MouseEvent e) { Point b = e.getPoint(); int relX = e.getX(); int relY = e.getY(); System.out.println("Mouse x: " + relX); System.out.println("Mouse y: " + relY); // Determines which tile the click occured on int xTile = relX/tileSize; int yTile = relY/tileSize; System.out.println("X Tile: " + xTile); System.out.println("Y Tile: " + yTile); // Get the position of the tile in ArrayList format int arrayLPos = (xTile * 1) + (yTile * 10); System.out.println("MouseListener: ArrayListPosition: " + arrayLPos); if(isActorSelected == false) { System.out.println("MouseListener: Actor selected: false"); // Check if that tile has an Actor int tempSelectedActorId = board.getTileActorId(arrayLPos); System.out.println("MouseListener: Selected actor Id: " + tempSelectedActorId); // If tempSelectedActor Id isn't -1, if(tempSelectedActorId != -1) { selectedActorId = tempSelectedActorId; isActorSelected = true; System.out.println("MouseListener: Selected Actor is: " + selectedActorId); } } else { System.out.println("MouseListener: Actor selected: true"); moveActor(arrayLPos); } } } // Moves the actor (should update graphics, but doesn't) public void moveActor(int destinationIn) { LinkedList <Integer> actorMoves = calculateMoves(destinationIn); // get the int values representing the co-ordinates the actor must move through to get to destination // Iterates through the actorMoves for(int i = 0 ; i < actorMoves.size() ; i++) { System.out.println("MoveActor: Move " + i + ": " + actorMoves.get(i)); // Resets the actor Id of the current position to -1 to denote empty int currentPos = actorList.get(selectedActorId).getActorPosition(); board.setActorIdInTile(currentPos, -1); // Sets the actor position in the actor object and on board actorList.get(selectedActorId).setActorPosition(actorMoves.get(i)); board.setActorIdInTile(actorMoves.get(i), selectedActorId); // Starts a thread to update the board new Thread() { public void run() { System.out.println("Paint thread started"); repaint(); } }.start(); // Puts main thread to sleep try { System.out.println("Main thread sleeping"); Thread.sleep(500); } catch (InterruptedException ex) { Logger.getLogger(ImageLoader6.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex); } System.out.println("Main thread active"); } } // Calculates the tiles the actor will have to pass through to get to their destination public LinkedList calculateMoves(int destinationIn) { // Get current position int currentPos = actorList.get(selectedActorId).getActorPosition(); // Get Destination int destination = destinationIn; int movementValue = 0; // Create a linked List to store the moves LinkedList <Integer> movesList = new LinkedList<>(); do { currentPos = currentPos + movementValue; movementValue = 0; System.out.println("CalcMove: Current position is " + currentPos); int currentY = currentPos / BOARD_WIDTH; int currentX = currentPos % BOARD_WIDTH; int destinationX = destination % BOARD_WIDTH; int destinationY = destination / BOARD_WIDTH; if (destinationX > currentX) { movementValue += 1; System.out.println("CalcMove: Destination X " + (destinationX) + " is greater than Current X position" + (currentX)); System.out.println("CalcMove: movementValue is " + movementValue); } if (destinationX < currentX) { movementValue -= 1; System.out.println("CalcMove: Destination X " + (destinationX) + " is less than Current X position" + (currentX)); System.out.println("CalcMove: movementValue is " + movementValue); } if (destinationY > currentY) { movementValue += BOARD_WIDTH; System.out.println("CalcMove: Destination Y " + (destinationY) + " is greater than Current Y position" + (currentY)); System.out.println("CalcMove: movementValue is " + movementValue); } if (destinationY < currentY) { movementValue -= BOARD_WIDTH; System.out.println("CalcMove: Destination Y " + (destinationY) + " is less than Current Y position" + (currentY)); System.out.println("CalcMove: movementValue is " + movementValue); } movesList.add(currentPos + movementValue); }while(currentPos + movementValue != destination); return movesList; } }[/CODE] This is for the individual tiles [CODE]/* * A tile is a single square on the board */ public class Tile { /* INSTANCE FIELDS */ private int actorId; private String tileType; /* CONSTRUCTOR */ public Tile(String tileTypeIn) { actorId = -1; tileType = tileTypeIn; } /* METHODS */ // Returns the actor Id of a given tile public int getActorId() { return actorId; } // Sets the actor Id in a tile public void setActorId(int actorIdIn) { actorId = actorIdIn; } // Returns the type of tile (i.e. grass or sand) public String getTileType() { return tileType; } }[/CODE] This allows Imageloader6 to interact with the individual tiles [CODE]/* * Allows the main program (Imageloader) to interact with the individual tiles */ import java.util.ArrayList; public class GameBoard { /* INSTANCE FIELDS */ public static ArrayList <Tile> grid; /* CONSTRUCTOR */ public GameBoard() { grid = new ArrayList <Tile> (100); for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) { if(i % 10 > 1 && i % 10 < 8) { grid.add(i, new Tile("sand")); } else { grid.add(i, new Tile("grass")); } } } /* METHODS */ // Returns actor Id of a given tile public int getTileActorId(int terrainTileIn) { return grid.get(terrainTileIn).getActorId(); } // Sets actor Id of a tile public void setActorIdInTile(int terrainTileIn, int actorIdIn) { grid.get(terrainTileIn).setActorId(actorIdIn); } // Returns tile type public String getTileType(int terrainTileIn) { return grid.get(terrainTileIn).getTileType(); } }[/CODE] This class is for the Actors, or characters which will make up the game [CODE] public class Actor { /* INSTANCE FIELDS */ private int position; private int actorId; private Image charImage; /* CONSTRUCTOR */ public Actor(int actorIdIn, int positionIn, String imageLocation) { actorId = actorIdIn; position = positionIn; charImage = new ImageIcon(imageLocation).getImage(); } /* METHODS */ // Returns actor's position public int getActorPosition() { return position; } // Sets actor's position public void setActorPosition(int positionIn) { position = positionIn; } // Returns image for the actor public Image getActorImage() { return charImage; } }[/CODE]
  2. Hello, Been stuck on this for a few days. Would really appreciate a little help. I'm trying to learn the basics of animating movement on a 2D Tileset. Characters can move in 8 directions on the board. If I click several tiles distant, the intermediate moves are not shown - the character just moves instantly to the end point I used println to feed back information. It seems the thread is being created, but that it is not calling the paint method. This method gets the tiles the character must pass through to get to his destination, moves the character, starts a thread to call repaint, then sleeps to allow the animation (which doesn't happen) to occur. [source lang="java"]public void moveActor(int destinationIn) { LinkedList <Integer> actorMoves = calculateMoves(destinationIn); // get the int values representing the co-ordinates the actor must move through to get to destination // Iterates through the actorMoves for(int i = 0 ; i < actorMoves.size() ; i++) { System.out.println("MoveActor: Move " + i + ": " + actorMoves.get(i)); // Resets the actor Id of the current position to -1 to denote empty int currentPos = actorList.get(selectedActorId).getActorPosition(); board.setActorIdInTile(currentPos, -1); // Sets the actor position in the actor object and on board actorList.get(selectedActorId).setActorPosition(actorMoves.get(i)); board.setActorIdInTile(actorMoves.get(i), selectedActorId); // Starts a thread to update the board new Thread() { public void run() { System.out.println("Paint thread started"); repaint(); } }.start(); // Puts main thread to sleep try { System.out.println("Main thread sleeping"); Thread.sleep(500); } catch (InterruptedException ex) { Logger.getLogger(ImageLoader6.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex); } System.out.println("Main thread active"); } }[/source] This is the paint method. First it draws the tiles, then the characters on top. [source lang="java"]// Paints the map public void paint(Graphics g) { System.out.println("Paint Method started"); for(int i = 0 ; i < 100 ; i++) { String type = board.getTileType(i); int x = (i % 10) * 64; int y = (i /10) * 64; // Checks the tile object to determine whether it is grass or sand if(type.equalsIgnoreCase("grass")) { g.drawImage(grass, x, y, null); } else { g.drawImage(sand, x, y, null); } } // Works through the list of actors, draws them for(int j = 0 ; j < actorList.size() ; j++) { // Get Actor's position & convert to X,Y coordinates int actorPosition = actorList.get(j).getActorPosition(); int actorX = (actorPosition % 10) * tileSize; int actorY = (actorPosition / 10) * tileSize; g.drawImage(actorList.get(j).getActorImage(), actorX, actorY, null); } try { Thread.sleep(20); } catch (InterruptedException ex) { Logger.getLogger(ImageLoader6.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex); } }// End of paint()[/source] Here's a sample of the output. It seems the paint method is not being called by the thread. MoveActor: Move 0: 22 Main thread sleeping Paint thread started Main thread active MoveActor: Move 1: 33 Main thread sleeping Paint thread started Main thread active MoveActor: Move 2: 44 Main thread sleeping Paint thread started Main thread active Paint Method started If you need me to post the whole program, no problems. Let me know. Any help hugely appreciated!
  3. Hello, I'm currently prototyping a game in java, which I hope to develop to a proper game. It's 2D, top down, fullscreen, turn-based strategy, with simple animation. Currently I've built it in swing, using Frames and I'm currently working on a panel which the graphics will be drawn to. My question is, is building a game in swing (with a fullscreen, undecorated panel) a bad idea? Should I be working in fullscreen exlusive mode? I should add, there is a management aspect to the game, which necessitates a lot of buttons and labels. Thank you!
  4. Figured it out, for what that's worth. Posting incase it's of any use to the next guy! [CODE] import javax.swing.*; import java.awt.*; import javax.swing.ImageIcon; public class ImageLoader extends JFrame { /* INSTANCE FIELDS */ private Image sand; private Image grass; private final int tileSize = 64; private final int WIDTH = 256; private final int HEIGHT = 192; private int [][] map; /* CONSTRUCTOR */ public ImageLoader() { setSize(WIDTH, HEIGHT); loadImages(); prepareMap(); printMapIntegers(); setVisible(true); repaint(); } /* METHODS */ // Loads Images public void loadImages() { sand = new ImageIcon("C:\\My Folder\\Game Development\\Testing\\Graphics\\sandTile.png").getImage(); grass = new ImageIcon("C:\\My Folder\\Game Development\\Testing\\Graphics\\grassTile.png").getImage(); } // Sets an Integer for each tile, representing whether it is grass or sand public void prepareMap() { map = new int [HEIGHT / tileSize][WIDTH / tileSize]; // R = 3 / C = 4 for(int r = 0 ; r < 3 ; r++) { for(int c = 0 ; c < 4 ; c++) { // Is a SAND TILE if(c > 0 && c < 3) { map[r][c] = 0; } // Is a GRASS TILE else { map[r][c] = 1; } } } } // Prints Integer Values for tiles public void printMapIntegers() { for(int r = 0 ; r < 3 ; r++) { for(int c = 0 ; c < 4 ; c++) { System.out.print("" + map[r][c]); } System.out.println(""); } } // Paints the map public void paint(Graphics g) { for(int r = 0 ; r < 3 ; r++) { for(int c = 0 ; c < 4 ; c++) { // If integer value is 0, draw SAND if(map[r][c] == 0) { g.drawImage(sand, c*64, r*64, null); } // Else, draw GRASS else { g.drawImage(grass, c*64, r*64, null); } } } } } [/CODE]
  5. ** CODE PROVIDED BY !NULL** Getting somewhere with it, but hindered by limited knowledge of the graphics class. This is the launcher class: [CODE]package graphicstester; import javax.swing.JFrame; public class GraphicsLauncher { public static void main(String[] args) { GraphicsTester gt = new GraphicsTester(); gt.setTitle("Graphics Tester"); gt.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE); gt.setVisible(true); } }[/CODE] This is the first attempt at the tester. The frame loads, but doesn't draw the images. This may be because the paint method is automatically by the frame too early. [CODE]package graphicstester; import java.awt.Graphics; import java.awt.Graphics2D; import java.awt.Image; import java.util.Random; import javax.swing.JFrame; import javax.swing.ImageIcon; public class GraphicsTester extends JFrame { static final int WIDTH = 640; static final int HEIGHT = 480; int tileSize = 32; int map[][]; Random rand = new Random(); Image tile1; boolean imagesLoaded; Graphics g; /* CONSTRUCTOR */ public GraphicsTester() { setSize(WIDTH, HEIGHT); loadImages(); init(); setVisible(true); } /* METHODS */ public void init() { map = new int[WIDTH / tileSize][HEIGHT / tileSize]; // Assigns an integer value to each tile for(int i = 0; i < map.length; i++) { for(int j = 0; j < map[i].length; j++) { map[i][j] = 0; } } } // Loads Images public void loadImages() { tile1 = new ImageIcon("c:\\My Folder\\Game Development\\Testing\\Graphics Testing\\Graphics Tester\\Graphics\ ile1.jpg").getImage(); if(tile1 != null) { imagesLoaded = true; System.out.println("GraphicsTester.loadImages(): Images loaded = " + imagesLoaded); } } // Draws the map according to the assigned integer values public void paint(Graphics g) { //Graphics g2 = (Graphics2D)g; // Works through the rows for(int i = 0; i < map.length; i++) { // Works through the columns for(int j = 0; j < map[i].length; j++) { switch(map[i][j]) { case(0): g.drawImage(tile1,i*32,j*32, null); // Problem, graphics hasn't been initialised break; // case(1): // g.drawImage('your interesting tile',i*32,j*32); // break; default: g.drawImage(tile1,i*32,j*32, null); break; } } } } }[/CODE] This is the second attempt. It throws a null pointer at 78, probably because the graphics object hasn't been initialised. Did some tutorials on drawing images, but not sure how to draw from a loop. Any hints on solving this? At any rate, I'm going to have to learn more about the fundamentals. Time for a trip to the library! [CODE] package graphicstester; import java.awt.Graphics; import java.awt.Graphics2D; import java.awt.Image; import java.util.Random; import javax.swing.JFrame; import javax.swing.ImageIcon; public class GraphicsTester extends JFrame { static final int WIDTH = 640; static final int HEIGHT = 480; int tileSize = 32; int map[][]; Random rand = new Random(); Image tile1; boolean imagesLoaded; Graphics g; /* CONSTRUCTOR */ public GraphicsTester() { setSize(WIDTH, HEIGHT); loadImages(); init(); drawMap(); setVisible(true); } /* METHODS */ public void init() { map = new int[WIDTH / tileSize][HEIGHT / tileSize]; // Assigns an integer value to each tile for(int i = 0; i < map.length; i++) { for(int j = 0; j < map[i].length; j++) { map[i][j] = 0; } } } // Loads Images public void loadImages() { tile1 = new ImageIcon("c:\\My Folder\\Game Development\\Testing\\Graphics Testing\\Graphics Tester\\Graphics\ ile1.jpg").getImage(); if(tile1 != null) { imagesLoaded = true; System.out.println("GraphicsTester.loadImages(): Images loaded = " + imagesLoaded); } } // Draws the map according to the assigned integer values public void drawMap() { //Graphics g2 = (Graphics2D)g; // Works through the rows for(int i = 0; i < map.length; i++) { // Works through the columns for(int j = 0; j < map[i].length; j++) { switch(map[i][j]) { case(0): g.drawImage(tile1,i*32,j*32, null); // Problem, graphics hasn't been initialised break; // case(1): // g.drawImage('your interesting tile',i*32,j*32); // break; default: g.drawImage(tile1,i*32,j*32, null); break; } } } } } [/CODE]
  6. Thanks a lot !Null! I'm going to try this out now!
  7. [quote name='!Null' timestamp='1349818708' post='4988500'] I'm just a bit confused as to why you have a grid of buttons. [/quote] It may not be a very good set up. I mainly used it because I already had used something similar to make a battleships game. Each button corresponds to a tile object, which stores among other things the ID of the actor (-1 if vacant). [quote name='!Null' timestamp='1349818708' post='4988500'] Do you want to select characters with the mouse or whatever and have them move to that point (animating while moving?) [/quote] Yep, that's it. You click to select the actor within, then click again to move. It works, but it looks bad. There are lines separating the buttons (which can probably be removed), and animating movement between buttons is a worry. Can I ask how you built the map for your games? Thanks again
  8. Thanks !Null. I did have a look on the site earlier, but it seemed like it hasn't been updated in a while. Is it still usable with the current version of java? My main worry at the moment is that I have made a bad choice with how I created the map. It's a panel with gridlayout, and each element of the grid has a button with an imageIcon. I will probably use bird's eye 2d, rather than iso, as this is my first attempt at a serious game. The bit that troubles me most is animating movement (i.e. a character walking between between buttons). Would this be done by simultaniously updating the button at the current location and the destination button several times, to show the character leaving one button and entering the other? I am prepared to develop on something else (maybe XNA, or Unity) if it would simplify implementing the graphics, but I'm far more familiar with java. Any advice on this? Thanks a lot, this has been giving me a real headache!
  9. Hello. I did something similar (in java) using a static arraylist of items in the main class. If your characters will have inventories too, you could build a static arraylist of items into your character class. On creating items, I created a Utility class which has a static spawnItem method, which sends the variables to the relevant constructor in the relevant item class. Then I populated txt files (one for melee, one for ranged, etc) with the items stats. To create a particular item, you just have to send the item's text file, the row which contains the variables, and the amount of items you want, to spawnItem, which constructs the item, then place it in the relevant item arraylist. This worked, but there are doubtless easier ways to handle this.
  10. Thanks Arthur. Doing some XNA tutorials at the minute, seems much better for handling graphics. Might try Unity afterwards and hopefully will have a solution by then! Daithi
  11. Hello, I've been working on making a simple prototype in java (netbeans) for a game for the last few months. The game is a tile & turn based strategy/RPG in the vein of JA, X-Com, Fallout. I've built the majority of the game logic - the character system (Stats, skills, perks, levels, inventory), the TB combat system (with melee and ranged), some basic A.I.s , simple GUIs, a system for loading enemies and PCs, and a fair bit of the content: weapons (40 or so), armour, equipment, enemies. The plan was to get all the basics working and then recruit a graphics and sound person to help, when I'm fairly sure I'll be able to finish the game. The main problem is my lack of knowledge on manipulating images. The current set up for the map (which I strongly suspect is not a good one), is a 16*30 arraylist of buttons with imageIcons. Characters (which are just portraits ATM) can be selected and moved around this grid, and the button Arrays imageIcons are changed appropriately. My main question at this point is: 1) can a simple level of animation be achieved with imageIcons - i.e. walking between tiles/buttons, crouching, firing weapons, melee attacks be easily done, even in straight down 2d? If so, how? Here are some other thoughts/questions - please feel free to comment on any, or recommend reading. 2) Does anyone know how animation was achieved in the likes of JA, X-Com, Fallout, which all appear to be tile based? 3) I've considered some other ideas like putting a graphical layer on top of the buttons (not sure how), and somehow corresponding the upper graphical layer to what is happening beneath on the button array. Could this be achieved, and how difficult would it be. 4) The other thing I am considering is discarding the button array creating a single map for the level, and putting a set of coordinates on it which characters can move to. Would this be any good? 5) Finally, is there a better engine/framework I could use for the project? Definitely not opposed to moving to something else if it would allow me to handle the graphical end more easily. Any recommendations? If I haven't provided enough detail, or have been unclear, please feel free to ask. Thanks for your help!
  12. Hello, I’m looking for some advice on getting started in game development. I have a small amount of programming knowledge (Java) and am working my way through a book on games development in XNA through C#. I have made a few very simple games to date: a word matching game, a tetris style game, and am currently fiddling with a simple version of battleships. What I’d like to look at next is making a simple turn based, 2D, combat game (just the combat section for now). I have a basic story, and some notes on game logic. I’d like to develop the game with rudimentary graphics which I’ll make myself, and then involve a proper visual artist later if the project looks like it’s worthwhile. Any general advice, or pitfalls I should be aware of? More specific questions:[list=1] [*]Any rules of thumb for deciding on the tile size? [*]If I make a prototype and then get a graphics person who believes the tile size should be changed, how much work will be involved in making the changes? [*]How simple (or difficult) is it to move from 2D to isometric? [*]To what extent do engines like Torque simplify and speed up the development process? [*]Does Torque (or any similarly cheap engines) come with a graphics library I can use? [/list] Any help is greatly appreciated! Thank you!