• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Akando

Members
  • Content count

    13
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

101 Neutral

About Akando

  • Rank
    Member
  1. I stumbled upon this website a few years ago, but just recently started to delve deeper into the more advanced coding and artistic aspects of the Byond program. I was wondering if anyone else on gamedev has had a chance to play with Byond, and if so did they run into any complications with the abilities that Byond offered to a game dev?
  2. The 3d box wasn't a game loop or anything, it was just a program that showed a rotating box and that was all it was suppose to do. I was thinking of adding features to it to learn further steps. Currently I wanted to make a pac man clone so I could try to help reinforce things and learn things I need to for programming games.
  3. Thats one reason I was thinking that if I learned some more detail on these subjects it might help because then I could that the 3d box and make it bounce around and do collision detection of the walls or maybe another box. I could also take double buffering so I could have the background moving so that it looked like the box was flying as it rotated. Another thing I wanted to see if anyone knew of was there a book or website with "problems" of things to program going from easy to really hard. Maybe that way I can increase my programs farther by just running through them all and seeing if maybe I learned anything new from them.
  4. I've written a few visual basic that do different arthimitic, takes input of values and gives you costs or how much yardage you would need, a java program that has a cyan background and a smily face that moves around. I am currently working on making its magenta background transparent or masked. I've made some karel the robot programs that have it moving around in different points and spelling out my name by going in one side of the letter and out the other side. You could put the letters in any order and it would still spell put the letters on screen in the order you wanted them to. I made a program with C++ and opengl that displays a 3d box on screen that rotates at a 45 degree angle at a rotation speed of 10ms. I've made a bunch of simple little programs, but I am trying to move further. I did a C# program of a number guessing game, but it had no advanced functions or anything.
  5. I have been messing around with some game programming but I always hit a brickwall. I think at this point the code makes sense but maybe I am confused on what I should actually be coding. Anyone know of any good books for the concepts behind making a game in general like threading, triple and double buffering, collision detection, UI, GUI, etc....
  6. Thats what I needed. I've been looking for reference sheets all over the internet for any of the languages and it never gives me something of much use. It may tell me the function itself but it doesn't say anything about the import. LIke I now know that java.awt is for the user interface, from what I've seen it was just for graphics and keyboard input so only about 1/3rd of what that import is actually capable of. Thank you.
  7. If you use them in a game that you resell then yes it is very illegal, but if you own the game then you can use them for your own personal use. You can not represent them as your own basically.
  8. That doesn't give me the full answer I was looking for. I was mainly using that as an example, but was I really wanted to find out what how do I know what functions are already in a language? like there is srand, math, swing, jframe, etc.... Where do I find out more information about these? Do I have to open the actual .lib or package file to look at them and figure out what they do?
  9. I have been messing with C++, Java, Basic, etc... for awhile. The problem I am runing into is that if I get a book about it or watch a youtube tutorial on it they use things that I can not find much on. one such thing is with java when they say to [b][size="2"][color="#7f0055"][size="2"][color="#7f0055"]import[/color][/size][/color][/size][/b][size="2"][color="#000000"] javax.swing.JFrame;[/color][/size] [size="2"][color="#000000"]I am confused as to how they got this import, where it comes from, what exactly it does.[/color][/size] [size="2"][color="#000000"]Anyone have suggestions of where I can look to find the functions that are already built into a language?[/color][/size]
  10. I have tried that many times, but I do not like the art books way of going about it. They have you look at things and draw them as you see them. This has helped me greatly with shading and drawing things that I see, but I still end up with the block where I can not take a idea I have in my head and place it on paper or screen. I start to draw some lines and either they come out to squiggly or it ends up getting morphed into something completly different after I get the first line down. Do you think tracing with paper/ using low opacity layers to copy pictures may help me learn to put my own ideas onto paper or the screen?
  11. I have been messing with game design, programming, art for awhile now but I always run into a snag where I am not a good artist and can never get something worth putting up on the screen to even continue playing around with in the game development process. I understand there are a lot of sprite sheets out there, but I prefer to use my own things because I feel it helps me learn and understand things better. I am trying to start out small with 16 bit, don't wanta even try 8 bit, pixel art characters. I've found lots of tutorials and books but they all mainly cover shading and the such. The problem I run into is I can not figure out how to transform what I see in my head, say a boar, into something even closely resembling that on paper, screen, any medium. Anyone know of any good guides, tutorials, or books that would help me with my block on ideas?
  12. I've been registered to Gamedev.net for awhile, but I have never made any posts. Figured I would drop and finally say high to everyone. Where am I currently at with my programming? Not very far lol. I am currently enrolled at my community college and taking some classes. For my class right now I am useing Simple Program Design A Step-by-Step Approach fifth edition. Its pretty good for getting everything set up for before you even start coding. I just started working on the game from scratch using SMFL and finnaly got SMFL to work with my ATI card so I am excited about that. Been reading a lot of different beginner C++ books. I know they say not to start out with C++ but of all the languages the rest seem rather odd. I think I am just having a hard time grasping Object oriented programming and the use of classes. If anyone knew of any good books or tutorials dedicated to those two things I'd be more then happy to give them a read to see if they help. Nice to meet all of you.