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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Moonflow449

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  1. Hi everyone   I´m an art student that wants to work for the videogame industry someday, but for now I´m just study by my own and make commissions time to time so it´s kind of boring sometimes that´s why I would like to collaborate in some videogame project. I don´t ask for money, I just do this for the experience and get into something interesting.   I have experience in characters and props (weapons and stuff like that) not so much in environments but I would love to start to do them so no problem if you need some. Here is a link to my portfolio http://digestedworlds.carbonmade.com/   And deviant art where you can find old stuff too. http://wolfnoom.deviantart.com/   If anyone is interested, please talk a bit about the project and who you are.  
  2. Azgur: I didn´t know that designers might end up learning programming too, it´s good to know. And yeah in level design I found a lot of limitations to do something fun and at the same time creative, UDK (the softwer I choose) requires programming skill to make your own rules. Destin Bales: Thank you, it´s a fantastic guide. there is a lot of nice information. To be hired to make games, first become good at making games o.o, makes a lot of sense.
  3. [quote name='Azgur' timestamp='1338123099' post='4943691'] [quote name='Moonflow449' timestamp='1338066675' post='4943561'] [quote name='Azgur' timestamp='1338007470' post='4943406'] Proving yourself as a game designer is generally a bit trickier than the other professions (like artist, programmer, etc). While level design demonstrates a certain skill, it doesn't really demonstrate particular game designer skill. Personally I find there's a really good solution to this outside of the realm of digital entertainment. Designing, balancing and play testing table-top/card games is an excellent way to hone and prove your skill as a game designer. The assumption here is that you do attempt to go out of the box a bit [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img] [/quote] Thank you for the sugestion [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img] it seems a good idea to improve skills as a designer but maybe it would be a little bit hard to get the job with that kind of work, how do you show to a company that your game is fun? in person? [/quote] It's a hard thing to show, but being able to explain design decisions and the results they get goes a long way. You could even record play testing sessions if you wanted to. Though, the former is more likely what would happen [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]. At the very least, record your progress. What problems did you find, which decisions did you make to fix them, that's great stuff to show off. I guess half the issue with game design always is proving/showing your skill before you have released titles on your resume. Some companies will give you a design test. Having done board games or other games will have prepared you for these tests more than having done level design. Unless your intention is to get hired as a level designer. Either way, generally it comes down to sounding like you know what you're talking about at the interview. In order to reach that point you need practice and a ton of it. And making digital games can be a bit too time consuming and too technical to efficiently spent your time honing your game designer skill. However, that said. It will still be worth it to make games in Flash or other lower entry technologies. [/quote] Thank you again! I found your comments very useful. You said "too time consuming and too technical to efficiently spent your time honing your game designer skill". I am interested in knowing what kind of work you are referring, I know a little bit of design, but more about the theory then actually the practice. By the way, I don´t want to be a level designer my whole life, I don´t even like it too much, I´m just trying to break in. i need money, if I can´t start to work soon in something related with videogames I might end up in a MacDonald’s or something like that :S
  4. [quote name='Azgur' timestamp='1338007470' post='4943406'] Proving yourself as a game designer is generally a bit trickier than the other professions (like artist, programmer, etc). While level design demonstrates a certain skill, it doesn't really demonstrate particular game designer skill. Personally I find there's a really good solution to this outside of the realm of digital entertainment. Designing, balancing and play testing table-top/card games is an excellent way to hone and prove your skill as a game designer. The assumption here is that you do attempt to go out of the box a bit [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img] [/quote] Thank you for the sugestion it seems a good idea to improve skills as a designer but maybe it would be a little bit hard to get the job with that kind of work, how do you show to a company that your game is fun? in person?
  5. [quote name='Tom Sloper' timestamp='1337879346' post='4942946'] [quote name='Moonflow449' timestamp='1337874893' post='4942930'] So in order to put my feet on the door and live from videogames I am thinking on doing level design, the finished work would be a video showing the level. is this a good way to archive my goal? [/quote] No. One level is not enough. You should design at least three levels. And while videos are a reasonable way of showing your designs to someone who does not have the necessary base technology to run your levels on, you should also provide the levels themselves, for people who do have the necessary base technology. Level design is a good entry path to game design. You need to build a level design portfolio website, and make your levels and videos and resume available there. [/quote] Thank you for your answer, I will do that.
  6. Hello, I´m trying to break into the industry as a videogame designer. But I found that the role of a videogame designer is very versatile, I found very different kind of designers that are also level designers, programmers, animators, concept artists etc. From my point of view companies need to finish videogames and in order to do that they need people with specific skills to execute ideas, not someone who is aiming for that abstract role of videogame designer. So in order to put my feet on the door and live from videogames I am thinking on doing level design, the finished work would be a video showing the level. But at the same time I wanted to do something fun, with a story and a simple gameplay like a puzzle inside the level, so the ultimate goal is an interesting video to watch showing my capacities as a level designer and game designer. [b]The why of this post: [/b]is this a good way to archive my goal? How and what companies valorize when choosing a good game design? I would like to know what you guys think, also I would appreciate (if someone want to say) how you prepared yourself to get the designer job, it would be interesting hear different stories and methods. Thank you.