fireside7

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About fireside7

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    Art
    Design
    Programming
  1. Weird fears?

    One of my fears is something will happen to me and no one will take care of my dog. I also have a fear of confinement with other people, like in an elevator. I'm fine if it's empty, but break out in a sweat when it's full. Even being trapped in a line at the grocery store gets me nervous. Along those lines is the fear of crowds. All those people moving in a mob is terrifying. I can't imagine going to a protest or something.
  2. How to stay motivated?

    I think it's mainly momentum. Even if it's a few minutes a day, make sure you open it up and actually do something. If you get tired of it, work on a different portion. Creativity can help brighten your outlook. Think of it as the one thing that is actually yours and that you have full control over.
  3. I'm using an i3 on a desktop and it's fine for Unity and Blender. I have a gtx950 card. If you are doing indy game dev, you want to do something that will run on smartphones, so you don't need much power. Also, if it runs on your machine, it will probably run well on the average user's machine. The triple AAA games are in another league and you have to be in a large team for that kind of thing.
  4. Hobby: How do you finish your projects?

    I have this exact same problem. Lately, I've decided to look at it as the journey that's important instead of the finished project. It's like anything, you build it up in your mind that there is so much left to do, etc, and it makes it worse and worse to keep going. Instead I break it down into a small next goal like getting this part working. Another thing I've been doing is break it up into main sections and then work on all of them periodically, instead of totally finishing one section before moving on. It keeps it fresh. And, like someone else said, just get a basic section working and then add to it. For me, these are separate projects that will later be joined.
  5. A good engine for a space game?

    This is kind of irrelevant since the the original comment  person is apparently done with it and hasn't checked back in, but you have made me realize this site isn't really for me.  
  6. Next Logical Step...

    I haven't actually used UE, so I might be wrong, but c++ is hardly ever used for a scripting language because it kind of defeats the purpose of not worrying about memory management.  When an engine is set up for scripting, then you mainly add classes that extend the functionality.  
  7. Next Logical Step...

    I would think a little about directx.  Everything is going to web and multiplatform and that leaves directx kind of out.  It's proprietary and it's like using something specific to an Apple computer or whatever.  WebGL will be the graphics standard eventually, since we all use the web.   It's already accepted on pretty much everything, but I think Microsoft is fighting it a little.  No idea why you are sick of the console, it can basically do anything.   From what you've said, I would recommend SFML and OpenGL, I think, or do some searches.  UE is a scripting language mostly, so from the way you are talking, probably not quite the right direction.  More like Unity. I would get some 2d images from OpenGameArt and just do some 2d games first with SFML, and then possibly move to Opengl.
  8. Need suggestion

    I don't think the number of surfaces probably would matter very much.  You could use a numbering system also, and load them by converting an int to the end of the string in a for loop.
  9. A good engine for a space game?

    Avilus: We read the directives differently, maybe we should just each make recommendations based on that, and not criticize the other ones that saw it differently.  I reread it, and I think Opengl or Ogre fit what his stated goals are better than the engines given.  I use Unity and it's great, but I've used Ogre and OpenGL and neither one is particularly hard for someone I think is in his position and programming wise, they would be better choices.  For speed, the other engines would be better.
  10. A good engine for a space game?

    What? That makes no sense. What relation does Ogre have with learning C++?   Ogre is built to use c++, not a scripting language that you can extend if you want to.  There are libraries for the other functions of game making.  The "OP" even mentioned DirectX and OpenGL, so obviously there is a disconnect here somewhere and you've mind read the whole situation and determined he wants a complete engine.  Myself, I don't think that's what he was looking for from reading his statements.  If one of your stated goals is learning c++, then those engine recommendations don't really fit the bill.  Ask anyone using it, besides possibly the authors, if they are using c++.    
  11. A good engine for a space game?

    This isn't what the OP was looking for...   "I'm looking for an engine that is Open source(I literally have no money otherwise i'd use UE4), uses C++ and is "Relatively" straight forward. "       I really wonder if any of the engines suggested use C++.  I have't looked at them, but it's uncommon for  scripted engine with lots of editors to use c++.   Ogre is only a rendering engine, which means the operator connects to the other libraries in a normal c++ way.  So, if he is serious about learning more about c++, not using the fastest and easiest engine, then Ogre would be the logical choice.     Personally, though, I would find some tutorials in OpenGL such as these: http://www.spacesimulator.net/wiki/index.php?title=3d_Engine_Programming_Tutorials
  12. A good engine for a space game?

    Ogre.
  13. Is Unity good for learning?

    Unity is pretty much the indie engine of choice right now.  You can do 2d or 3d or some of each.  It outputs to lots of platforms.  There is a huge community that is helpful.  You can buy things on the asset store if you are lazy or art challenged.  Constantly updated.  Takes imports from many art programs like Maya, Blender, many others.
  14. Assets first?

    Unity kind of functions on an assets first premise, where you attach scripts to objects.  If you want to get started in a hurry, you could get Playmaker for about 45 dollars on the assets store and run through their tutorials.  
  15. Unity Unity or C++?

    What I've found over the years and trying a lot of things is this.  Take every short cut you can find, because even if you do that, you probably still won't finish any but the shortest game.