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      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Eastfist

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  1. I'm using Qt 4.8.7, which seems to be the last of the line of Qt version 4. I don't want to jump to Qt 5 simply because installs are getting bigger. Granted, they are trying to provide support for more operating systems, but it is very clunky. I looked into Necessitas for Android and the whole process of getting your app onto a mobile phone just seems clunky. Technically it all works, but usability goes out the window. I'm sticking with desktop deployment for now.
  2. It's been a LONG TIME since I last updated you guys on my game engine. This is what I've accomplished so far: https://youtu.be/sWIAZwODEMo
  3. http://qt.eastfist.com I'll be putting up a series of very basic tutorials on Qt c++ while I recover from surgery.
  4. You need to do some heavy processes in that render loop. Then you'll see if that frame rate is going to hold.
  5. Just translated some image distortion algorithms from c# to Qt c++. Looks amazing, although not ideal for real-time rendering. Have to still learn about bilinear interpolation and direct pointers to pixels.
  6.   You can say that again.  Very appropriate level of abstraction for beginners.
  7. I realize now that if I continue to rewrite my code, I'll never get it done. This iteration, though, is quite robust. But it seems I encounter a new problem everytime I implement a new feature to make it easier to use. For example, today was all about make tabs.
  8. Qt manages to open/draw a 24 megapixel jpeg with ease (because of built-in double-buffering in their widgets). However, in GIMP, which is built with GTK, it tears all over the place. I dare someone to write a Qt paint program comprehensive enough to compete with GIMP.
  9. I love how well c++ runs (when the code is good). But I also understand why it's intimidating to new programmers (because c++ is not my first programming language). But how I learned it coming from Visual Basic was to look for the patterns in language syntax. Imagine one day when we'll all be programming with full graphical rebus language, looking like some kind of code we dial into Mortal Kombat. :P
  10. Success! Qt "real" 3D rotation transformations give me Mode-7 F-Zero type of rendering. Opens up all sorts of possibilities. Check out my video: http://youtu.be/KuTBzhBqU4Y
  11. First goal after completing the development kit is to "port" the fundamental seminal games like Tetris, Pac-Man, Mario. If I can do that with ease, then I will have accomplished what I set out to do. Of course, I don't want to get ahead of myself.
  12. New GUI is coming along nicely. Stability is the main issue.
  13. [quote name='JTippetts' timestamp='1346535272' post='4975551'] What you should worry about instead of language progression, is learning one language [i]really well[/i]. Once you have a strong grasp on programming, you will understand that the differences between most languages is very superficial.[/quote] +infinity OP, make an HTML+Javascript+CSS webpage game first. Make a div box move around on the screen when you press the keyboard. Then try to duplicate that in c++. Once you understand what it takes just to make a simple rectangle move on the screen, then you have conquered your first step. Everything else is built on that and it will become very complex so organization is going to be vital.
  14. If you're a beginner, I suggest not diving into OpenGL or even DirectX, just yet. Learn the native drawing API of your system or tool first. If you're using any of Microsoft Express editions, jump into GDI+ (or even GDI). Otherwise, there's Qt, which has their own QPainter class that makes those calls internally for you. At the least, it guarantees it will run without a dependency on the OpenGL or DirectX libraries.