BlackMagicWolf

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BlackMagicWolf last won the day on October 25

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About BlackMagicWolf

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    QA
  1. Tips on Building Portfolio

    Your portfolio should show off your skills, so use whatever game engine you work in best to show them off. Also, you don't have to make a game from scratch if you can't, find a team that needs your skills and help them. Any game you make is experience and something you can put in your portfolio.
  2. Where to find artists / designers ?

    Conceptart.org is also a great place to find people. They have multiple tiers to post on depending on your budget.
  3. There's a LOT of variables that goes into estimating your timeframe. The game itself, how much content you're going to put in at launch, the size of your team, your setup/capabilities, all of this will go into your timeframe, and what's more, you should account for delays, replacing co-workers, and more.
  4. General questions about Testing

    I've been a QA tester for both a AAA company and several indie game companies. There's many different levels of it. There's one who test the game while it's being worked on, there are those who test it after builds have been compiled, there are those who test for certain bugs (art, gameplay, audio, etc.), it's a multi-layered thing, and it takes time. My former AAA job had me playtesting as many aspects of the game I was assigned to every day. And every day I tried to find new bugs and errors based on the new builds that were made. Yes, QA testers have been treated poorly in the past, and yes, the pay could be better. However, it also depends on the company itself. The one I worked for was VERY kind to me, and kept us all excited to come into work the next day. And for a college kid? The pay was good. QA Testers are a vital part of game development. They help make things better so that the gamers aren't the ones finding it.
  5. Hey Everyone - Todd here. I’m a community manager for various projects, and one of them happens to be in Beta right now Indie developer Inductor is launching a special Limited Beta for upcoming mobile turn-based strategy title Exospecies. In the game, you control creatures from another world and use them to battle foes. It’s multiplayer to the extreme because you can actually play multiple games at once! If that sounds like your kind of game, then you might want to sign up for the Beta. Just make sure that your email address is linked to TestFlight – and enroll through the following link: http://exospecies.com And if you have any questions, don’t hesitate to ask!
  6. Google. lol. And use it to not just find free non-copyrighted music, but composers who are willing to help you on a budget. I once asked for something for a trailer I was doing, and like 20 people offered free work. It's the internet, there's always someone.
  7. It's ok to have a laid out idea for your game, but once you start working in a team and things start getting created, you'll realize that things might have to evolve and change. And that's ok.
  8. How Much is Too Much?

    That's all on you. You might think you want to cultivate all of these skills, then find out that you like one or two or even three more than the other. Try them all out, see if you want to stick with them. If you can? Great! If not, you know what you'll need help in. Either way, you'll learn, and that's the most important thing.
  9. Poker-based Card Battle RPG

    I agree, prototype it out, see if the Poker Rules line up with what you want from the game. If anything, maybe simplify it a little bit, make it so there's not this long line of one-ups that players have to remember. It does have potential though.
  10. Contracts are a big deal, especially in game making, because if not, they technically can steal your stuff. So definitely write up a contract when you decide to hire someone, because then if something goes wrong, you know at least that they can't take what they've made for YOUR game.
  11. Most Important Aspects in a Video Game Storyboard

    Storyboards are meant to block out scenes and show how they progress. This can apply to narrative scenes, action scenes, gameplay scenes, anything. They're meant to help show the flow so that the team can get a better grasp on what you're trying to tell them
  12. What are your focusing techniques?

    I try and set a specific time to do work. That way, I can plan in front of it to make sure I don't get distracted when that time comes.
  13. I really dig it, if I need a violinist for some music, I know who I'm calling! lol
  14. 3D Criticize my 3D game models

    The Goblin looks really good! Nice facial features, textures and personality. Not sure about the fish creature. What's it supposed to be?
  15. Who’s ready for a Steam game sale? Well, The Silent Age, the hit mobile title-turned-updated-PC-game has been given a 90% discount on Steam via the Halloween Sale! The game is $0.99 until November 1st. What is The Silent Age? Well, it’s a fun point and click adventure game, one that has you being a literal “average Joe”. But, your life takes a sudden twist when a time travel from the future comes and demands your help. The world is going to be ending via an event that starts in Joe’s time, and he has to stop it … somehow. You’ll jump between 1972 and the post-apocalyptic 2012 and try to figure out exactly what’s going on. The Silent Age has won many awards for its deep story and fun gameplay, don’t miss out on the chance to play it. Do you like point-and-click games? Do you feel this might be one you try out? If so, why? Try it out on Steam, here’s the link: http://store.steampowered.com/app/352520/The_Silent_Age/