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DarklyDreaming

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  1. The one who gets the largest bite of the cake, e.g. the largest amount of compensation, is the one who is the most financially invested in the venture -- simple as that. I can promise you that the programmer, artist, sound engineer and composer each put in their piece of the whole just as much as the next person -- but the company leader, the one who actually [i]pays [/i]them and takes on all the risk, deserves to reap the rewards when a financial return hits -- more so than the rest, since they did not take the same risks (they were hired, employees). If [i]you [/i]aren't taking an larger risk than anyone [i]else [/i]than why do you deserve a greater reward than the next man in the team? After all, none of them are getting paid nor are they hired -- thus, they are entitled to an equal share, aye? Unless you sign an agreement, this will get messy, really quickly. It doesn't matter if they expect nothing now, try telling them [i]that [/i]when cash rolls in! So, if you want to be "fair" and "ethical", why not hire them? That seems to be the most reasonable course of action. If not, then at the very fucking least sign a proper agreement before you release a product -- otherwise, there will be an ungodly lot of "but he said!" and "you said!" and then everyone is miserable.
  2. Balancing game development stuff with marketing and web development is... hard! Much harder than I thought it'd be!
  3. Why are you adding +1 to timer if it isn't within a function like main() or update()? It doesn't make sense to update timer without those. As far as your code goes, I guess you are simply doing this as a test and that is why you aren't doing this in an OOP friendly manner and also why your code isn't structured in any refined way -- so, basically you just loop through all three of the images and then, reaching the final one, reset to the first one? But does it do this multiple times? Or is it just the one time (as you indicated by saying: "timer++ not in a function" meaning nothing of this is in a function being continuously updated)? Finally, what is the image you are looping through? Where are EnemyRect and StorageRect defined? Lots and lots missing here to take any wild guesses, and I'm too tired honestly to try and figure out what it could be without more info about how the rest of your program is built.
  4. I find it funny to talk to less-than-stellar developers about things that they stubbornly refuse to acknowledge. Like why we all can't run Crysis on that '07 laptop your grandma bought you with a GMA-chipset... okay, no, it's just annoying...
  5. Working hard on getting the website 100% functional now... going to be a very long day!
  6. Obviously you can sell any kind of game you want, baring any regional restrictions, so with that silliness out of the way, let's get to the actual question: can you successfully sell a HTML 5 game without massive piracy? Yes, yes you can, with one [i]massive [/i]disclaimer -- it [i]must [/i]be a multiplayer game or people will pirate the beejesus out of you. If the players need access to a server, the chances of someone setting up a pirated server becomes much less likely -- even if s/he does, the choice of 'legal' servers would be more preferable most of the time since a) updates and b) stability c) official approval and general feel-good stuff (karma). There are plenty of cases of this, but so far I haven't seen a single [i]commercially [/i]successful open-sourced (or easily accessed source) single player game (minus donations, of course).
  7. Sought counseling, became an eremite, and eventually moved into a nearby mountain range. So, nothing much really.
  8. [quote name='way2lazy2care' timestamp='1325774643' post='4899946'] [quote name='DarklyDreaming' timestamp='1325733551' post='4899828'] For many games though, this isn't the case. Piracy occurs everywhere, even in regions where the game is legally and easily available -- price and economic factors play a role too. [/quote] [url="http://www.escapistmagazine.com/news/view/114391-Valves-Gabe-Newell-Says-Piracy-Is-a-Service-Problem"]http://www.escapistm...Service-Problem[/url] [/quote] Yes, I read that article as well. Your point more precisely? Nothing of what's in there isn't something I've'nt pointed out in my posts in this thread already... Service, pricing and other factors all play a role -- locking out regions will naturally create piracy. Whoop-dee-doo, big surprise. However, being available everywhere doesn't eliminate piracy -- it truly doesn't.
  9. [quote name='Antheus' timestamp='1325802592' post='4900141'] [quote name='SteveDeFacto' timestamp='1325802168' post='4900137'] If you don't like the ideas I present in this thread then perhaps you should stop bumping the thread! [/quote] Or maybe you should stop advocating Final Solution. There are no ideas here, just repeated attempts to justify extermination of people you find undesirable. I answered your original idea about your smart software developing nation by proposing Google. Your reply was clear that it's not what you are interested in, it's the laws and certain types of people you have problem with. Balkan wars were mentioned. I've lived through them. I grew up in a two class society. I've seen these ideas been spoken by people on television who rose to power. I've seen these words repeated as people were exterminated. And they are still familiar to lost generations today. Maybe others are willing to give you a benefit of doubt. I won't. Ideas like this are not to be humored or entertained but shunned and nipped in their buds. Period. [/quote] +1[quote name='SteveDeFacto' timestamp='1325793758' post='4900085'] [quote name='kseh' timestamp='1325792576' post='4900077'] [quote name='SteveDeFacto' timestamp='1325786416' post='4900034'] [quote name='kseh' timestamp='1325783814' post='4900014'] Near as I can tell, adversity is something that is needed in society. We need something to fight against or to overcome. Without it humans have no reason to try to adapt or change things to increase their odds of survival. And of course, too much of it also decreases our odds of survival. If the premice behind creating a nation is to remove elements of adversity (particularily ones that make you uncomfortable in the society you currently live in), you are ultimately creating a weakness (inability to adapt to adversity) which will lead back to the problems that you were trying to escape in the first place. This is why "evil" exists and why it must constantly be fought. Further, I can't help but point out that it kinda sounds as though you have this design document for a massively multiplayer society simulation and all you need is the programmers to bring it to life. I'm sorry but I have my own worlds that I'd like to create and experiment with and you will probably find it to be the same with other programmers. It'd be best if you first experiment with something on a smaller scale to learn the fundamental skills and dynamics involved in this industry and be prepared to continuously learn new things as technology and paradigms evolve. [/quote] I agree adversity is a dreaded but necessary fact of life. However, you have only stated what I have been trying to explain all along. As I see it the earth is a living system in which all organisms are interdependent on each other. Trees produce oxygen, bacteria in the ocean maintain the proper pH balance to support life, and predators keep prey from reproducing infinitely and stripping the land barren. Each organism makes up a cell in the entire living system we call earth. Unfortunately, one type of cell has mutated and the systems of regulation which apply to every other cell to prevent it from reproducing beyond what can be sustainable has been broken. In other words humans have become the cancer of the earth. The system will collapse and we will all die with it. As for my project I see little how that has to do with this topic, and I've already come to the conclusion you have stated. At this point I have little interest in finding help and will continue to work on it alone no matter how in vain my attempts may be. [/quote] No comment on any other programming projects you may be working on was intended. What I meant by that last bit was an attempt to politely, yet with a hint of humour, decline your offer to join your society while sugesting that rather than trying to start with something big like forming a nation maybe starting something smaller like on the scale of a local community. I was trying draw a metaphor likening this idea of creating a nation to the ambitous plans of a beginner programer who wants to build an MMO with no experience behind him and only needs a few programmers to help realise his vision. I would hope that you can see the similarities and the humour. If your over all concern is about the well being of life on the planet, it seems to me that you would have a smaller chance of affecting a change to avert global disaster by breaking away from existing centers of power than if you were to work from within them. If it's easy to become a politician then do it and effect a real change. [/quote] Actually, my concerns are with the survival of mankind. I care little about the lesser organisms which will inevitably be whipped out by an unforeseen natural disaster such as an asteroid or most likely mankind. I would like to see mankind eventually move to the stars but at this rate I don't think that day will ever come. I see little investment in our space program and as resources become tighter this problem is only getting worse. My hope is that by gathering the worlds greatest minds and enabling them to make real changes we can escape the fate of this world and all who inhabit it. [/quote] All who inhabit this earth... right, people like you then? Certainly you must see that your own criteria displaces you from this potential wonder-society? Or are you so incredibly arrogant as to claim to be one of the world's greatest minds? About the self-selection, yes -- those are the "minimum" requirements. Doesn't negate anything I said: education, background and many other factors play into what your chances are of getting elected into any position of official capacity. Just because an incredibly stupid politician operates here or there doesn't mean that there wasn't some form of reason for his ass getting selected for office -- even if that reason was horribly flawed. Start seeing how this whole thing works? OK. I'm done with this thread. You advocate ideas that have roots in some very murky waters... and don't try to pass it off as scientific, it isn't.
  10. [quote name='Gaiiden' timestamp='1325703084' post='4899667'] [quote name='DarklyDreaming' timestamp='1325702074' post='4899665'] The text cursor, yes. It jumps around if you put anything in italics, write some words without italics, and then backspace. No clue as to why or if this is just me -- but this is the second IP board that does it. [/quote] yes I know what you're talking about, but actually for me, here on this site the cursor actually behaves pretty well. Elsewhere, like when I edit my Wordpress blog, I sometimes can't even tell exactly where the cursor is most of the time. I've noticed this annoyance all over the place since FF7 or so. I think it's a Flash thing? Have you noticed your text cursor hopping around on other websites or just here on GDNet? It drives me bonkers wherever it happens. [/quote] Just here on GD.net and another IP board -- think it's something with their newer version of the text editor. Wordpress does it too, but that seems to be completely out of whack (half the time it seems to just do whatever it pleases and jumps at random). As far as I can tell, here it mostly only happens if I use italics, and only if I try to edit text after using them -- so I guess I'll be fine if I avoid [i]them [/i]and type a bit slower. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/ph34r.png[/img] [quote name='Gaiiden' timestamp='1325703084' post='4899667'] [quote] As to the workshops, they used to be great -- but they sort of died a slow quiet death until no-one took notice anymore. Maybe someday there'll be more of them and, hopefully, they'll actually finish. Posted Image [/quote] It was indeed unfortunate JWalsh had to suspend the current XNA workshop. He got a new job at Microsoft and has been adjusting these last few months. He keeps saying he wants to pick it back up again and now that you remind me I'm due to give him another poke about it.... [/quote] Sounds like a great idea, my only concern would that most of the participants just aren't there anymore. Make sure to post an announcement somewhere visible if JWalsh decides to pick it up as there are probably quite a few who just gave up on it after the posts stopped coming.
  11. [quote name='SteveDeFacto' timestamp='1325783919' post='4900015'] [quote name='swiftcoder' timestamp='1325783192' post='4900007'] [quote name='SteveDeFacto' timestamp='1325781240' post='4899989'] [url="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BXRjmyJFzrU"]Natural selection[/url][/quote] It's a cute trailer, but suggesting that this is a new phenomenon betrays a fundamental misunderstanding of the way human society has functioned for the past few thousand years. The lower/working classes have [b]always[/b] reproduced at a far higher rate than the ruling elite - I'm pretty sure that holds true across history. Up until the late 20th century, access to healthcare coupled to obscene rates of infant mortality still played a role as a limiting factor, but even taking that into account, it is simply disingenious to suggest that the elite have [b]ever[/b] outnumbered the poor and uneducated. And this leads to an interesting point: if the uneducated masses have always outnumbered the intelligentsia, how then has humanity made steady scientific and social progress? The answer is that our political systems are inherently self-selecting - a form of social darwinism, if you will. Members of the poor uneducated masses rarely make it into politics (except during times of cultural revolution, when their fresh blood is needed). The rest of the time, the educated are the ones who succeed in business and politics, thus dictating the direction of the culture as a whole... [/quote] Our political system is not self-selecting and stupid or crazy people raise to power all the time. However, your point about the cooperate sector holds true and has indeed been the driving force behind human progress. However, the pool of intelligent and talented individuals is much smaller than you may realize, and yet the demand has never been so great. As the population continues to grow this demand will only increase and the division between the upper and lower classes will only continue to widen. [/quote] It certainly [i]is [/i]self-selecting or otherwise anyone could easily become a politician -- which is not the case. Social factors, economic factors, education, background... this plays a huge part in what your chances are. Also, you seem to want to negate any worker class in this utopia of yours -- a thing that is at our current technological level simply not possible.
  12. A nation run by engineers reminds of what Adama told Lee before he assumes command of Pegasus: [quote]"- In your opinion, off the record, what was Garner's flaw? - He was used to working with machines. Command is about people."[/quote] No, I don't think a programmer would run a nation terribly well... EDIT: Oh, didn't read the thread first. Kinda wish I did. Puts that quote in a whole new light for me... Steve, I don't know much about you, but those are some incredibly sickening things -- if a leader ever enforced sterilization, I assure you I'd disassociate myself from anyone who supported him, and I would personally ensure he got the noose and nothing less. Any leader who puts himself above his people like that should be shot without questions. If we deem you "less than worthy" I assume you'll accept this forced sterilization on yourself and your children? Yeah. Hmm. Thought so. Fortunately, your "incredibly smart" wonderland would quickly fall apart once people with half a working brain cell understands just how desperately important these eugenic practices are... and what lengths you'll go to enforce them.
  13. [quote name='way2lazy2care' timestamp='1325703447' post='4899669'] [quote name='DarklyDreaming' timestamp='1325701363' post='4899662'] Piracy is driven by a misunderstanding of an evolving business model and customer dissatisfaction -- at a certain price point, mostly the traditional 60$ for AAA titles, people don't want just the [i]product, [/i]they want the [i]service [/i]to go with it. Sure it's not viable for many types of games, for various reasons, to provide constant updates and other assorted that would make it implausible or tedious to keep up with a pirated version (look at Minecraft, a game which updated so often that pirating it just became silly) but it [i]is [/i]what the costumer wants and they're right -- a 60$ game is, for the most part, not really worth its price., [/quote] Article related: [url="http://wii.ign.com/articles/121/1215619p1.html"]http://wii.ign.com/a.../1215619p1.html[/url] I read this this morning and I think it's kind of stupid. Here is my take on a recipe for piracy. 1. Have a desirable product. 2. Implement measures that force your markets to be separate more than they naturally are (region based DRM for example). 3. Only release the desirable product in specific markets. 4. Don't even hint at the product coming to a significant other market. To do these for things and expect people not to pirate the game is kind of silly imo. The writer of the article says that people who pirate need to support the game, but ignores that the developer isn't supporting the game the way they need to in the first place. [/quote] Right, but that's for games that aren't available in all regions -- naturally, people who [i]want [/i]the product will at that stage acquire it through other means if they cannot legally and easily find a copy to purchase. Quite reasonably this will result in massive amounts of customers "jumping ship" and joining with pirates to get a game they legally would've bought had it been available in their region of choice. For many games though, this isn't the case. Piracy occurs everywhere, even in regions where the game is legally and easily available -- price and economic factors play a role too. Players want value. If they feel they're getting left in the cold, or they need to lump over an unreasonable amount of money for the amount of game they're getting, they will turn to alternative methods or pass on the game -- either way, you lose customers. Naturally, we can't abide to the cheapskates that want "games 4 free" but we can certainly find ways to improve perceived value of the product and, more importantly, turn it into an ongoing service that benefits and rewards customer loyalty. That's really the only way to [i]stop [/i]piracy. Anything else is just slowing it down or crippling it somewhat. (Of course, here we're talking about "classic model" of games -- not the whole freemium model that relies on entirely different metrics)