CrazedGenius

Members
  • Content count

    1345
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

156 Neutral

About CrazedGenius

  • Rank
    Contributor
  1. Amount of QoS code?

    Hi, I'm looking for ballpark figures on the following. Any ideas would be appreciated: In terms of lines of code and CPU load, how much processing is needed to account for deficiencies in the network? In other words, if you could assume very high QoS, predictable latency, etc., how much could you pare down your code or how much processing could you save? I realize it's a bit of an open ended question, but I'm trying to generate some rough stats of the "cost" of networking on networks with very little real QoS. Any thoughts at all would be helpful.
  2. Either way works fine, but one advantage of using the ortho matrix is that you can use the matrix to scale things in interesting ways. For instance, you can specify vertex values between 0 and 1 and use the matrix to scale correctly whether the resolution is 640x480 or 1600x1200 (for instance). By using the offcenter functions, you can render arbitrary "viewports" into a scene and other interesting tricks. Can still do this with transformed vertices, but you have to get in and change the vertex data.
  3. This might negate some of the benefits of dealing with YUV, but what if you did the following: Tell DX you want an RGB texture. Write your values into the channels of the RGB texture. Use .r, .g, .b values (which are really YUV values) however you want. Bottom line - the card never tries to translate anything and you can do whatever you want. You might end up bloating the texture, but is that a concern? Perhaps I'm missing something - I'm using YUV textures right now, but I want them translated into RGB, so I've never really thought about how to stop it.
  4. Why Alpha Test is so slow?

    you will only get performance improvements when you make changes to the bottleneck. For instance, if your vertex processing is the bottleneck, changes to pixel processing won't buy you anything.