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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

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  1. Definitely do not link views with network stuff. They are for showing game entities and stuff but nothing else, except for technically listening to player input maybe.
  2. Just study the documentation of BufferedReader#readLine.
  3. [quote name='CinoGenX' timestamp='1341837628' post='4957236'] I’ve, of course, ignored seasoned advice and started off with C++. [/quote] Alright, you knew about the advice and are beginning to realize the reasoning behind. Then it's clear what to do now... A beginner shouldn't need 5 books about a f...... language - they should be about general software development, architecture, best practices, algorithms, patterns, etc. Languages are interchangable - basic knowledge is not. And you will hardly have enough time to get it all. There is absolutely no reason to start with C++ , beyond "it's cool, it's what the pros use". You can still come back to it in a few years.
  4. [quote name='armornick' timestamp='1341600151' post='4956422'] However, what stops me from just using these languages is that they require a rather large runtime. I'm a bit hesitant to ask potential players to install the JRE or .NET/Mono. I know most pc's have these runtimes nowadays but still. [/quote] Right, don't ask nobody to install runtimes [i]separately[/i] - just add them to the game installer. Can't speak of .NET, but you can bundle your private JRE which won't interfere with customer systems at all, they won't even notice what's under the hood.
  5. It sucks that you are not allowed to strip down the runtime by yourself when you bundle it. At least that will change with project Jigsaw. On the other hand, big titles take several giga bytes meanwhile, so what are 40MB compressed runtime for an Indie game compared to that ? About 8 minutes of OGG-compressed music take up about 30MB as well. That is just the natural evolution.
  6. Some LibGdx features:[list] [*]sprites [*]particles [*]OpenGL bindings [*]integrated bindings to the C++ physics library Box2D [*]bitmap fonts [*]UI widgets [*]support for tile maps [*]various target platforms like Windows, Linux, OSX, Android and soon iOS [*]audio [*]input [*]Open Source [/list]
  7. [quote name='argoneus' timestamp='1341521542' post='4956096'] So far I have my eyes on jMonkeyEngine because it seems both easy and powerful (and works on Lee-Nukes), but, is there anything else? [/quote] There is LibGdx for example. [quote name='argoneus' timestamp='1341521542' post='4956096'] I'm trying to avoid C++ for now as I am a beginner >.> [/quote] Good decision.
  8. [quote name='Ameise' timestamp='1338823708' post='4946139'] You can tell my friend who works on database servers where the client interface is written in Java that. [/quote] Oh yes, loading the database into memory and blaming Java for being slow... [quote name='Ameise' timestamp='1338823708' post='4946139'] ...Or any Android mobile developer. [/quote] FYI: You don't run Java on Android.
  9. [quote name='Ameise' timestamp='1338573578' post='4945379'] Actually, Java using more memory [i]can[/i] very much be a problem depending on what you're doing. Mobile devices (Android's Dalvik comes to mind) or large industry systems may see this. I have a friend who works for one of the large database providers, and with so many virtual instances running, their Java implementation constantly drives down the available system memory. Even in normal game development, Java tends to simply [i]eat up[/i] memory, and depending on what you're doing, memory might be in short supply. I do a lot of procedural work, and end up using a lot of memory. I've hit the 4 GiB limit in the past with C++; Java would have been worse. [/quote] Java does not tend to eat up memory. Excessive memory usage has nothing to do with Java itself, it all depends on your very own coding style and that of used libraries. Please do not feed age-old myths. True is, that automated garbage collection can lead to mindless programming habits, but that usually has bad consequences in each and every language and environment.
  10. JBox2D or the native binding of LibGdx to Box2d are possible options as well.
  11. Don't use ifs or switches for that. Create some kind of a dialog manager class which gets a game context as input and returns the appropriate dialog. Store the dialog mapping in some external format so you can add, modify and delete without compiling.
  12. [quote name='stein102' timestamp='1337760366' post='4942471'] What about the item system though? Got any ideas? [/quote] Probably, if I knew more requirement details...
  13. Then a linked list is a valid choice. Rearranging items will happen too infrequently to be of any significance.
  14. [quote name='stein102' timestamp='1337754093' post='4942448'] , then I could make a linkedList or something that you would use for the inventory. The problem is, if I have say 100+ items this would be very inefficient. [/quote] For doing what ? Choosing the right collection class is important, but that all depends on what you want to.
  15. [quote name='fourvector' timestamp='1337244535' post='4940877'] Is using instanceof expensive, or is it just considered bad form? To me it seems like the right thing to do. I use it frequently for my event distribution system to my components, since it seems more type safe than having some kind of string as an ID, which could be tricked, for instance, I could send a RegionChanged event, any component listening for RegionChanged events would check the type and respond in the right way. [/quote] Good or bad... it is a warning indicator of incomplete OOP design, of lacking polymorphism, most probably if used frequently. When dealing with various kind of events, you would rather have different event handler implementations as well.