WaywardSquanderer

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About WaywardSquanderer

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  1. Trying to understand how animation works from Ken Perlin's "[url="http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/login.jsp?tp=&arnumber=468392&url=http%3A%2F%2Fieeexplore.ieee.org%2Fiel1%2F2945%2F9858%2F00468392.pdf%3Farnumber%3D468392"]Real time responsive animation with personality[/url]" (sorry, article is behind pay wall), so this is probably for folks who are still in school or have access to IEEE journals. For a given joint, a range of motion is given for angle values of rotation about each axis {x,y,z}, e.g. start: {5 5 5} finish {-5 -5 -5} would mean the joint starts at 5 degrees of rotation about each axis and ends at -5 degrees of rotation about each access... I think. But a third 3-tuple is given that specifies how to go about interpolating between the limits/ ranges of motion. I think I get the "raised sine" part. For some time t, use the angle within the interval along the graph of raised sine. But more confusing is the use of the noise functions. I take it that this is supposed to interpolate between values, in our case between 5 and -5 for any axis (since they're all the same). But the functions generally take the form: .5 * (1 + noise(t)). I'm assuming t to be some time, though the paper does not specify this. What I definitely do not understand is how the noise functions actually interpolate between the extremes. Can anyone explain this? Also, I really don't understand the use of bias and gain. I graphed out Perlin's bias and gain functions, but I don't see how they relate to character animation nor the notation used in the paper.
  2. How crucial is iOS/ OS X experience?

    [quote name='Tachikoma' timestamp='1306521519' post='4816514'] Regarding iOS development, it is sufficient to get a refurb Mac Mini for nearly half the price of the $900 machine you posted. If you want to focus purely on iOS development, you don't need much grunt. Just get plenty of memory. That said, writing a iOS game on other platforms is possible, provided you keep as much code platform neutral as possible. You can download OpenGL ES 2.0 emulators on Windows or Linux, including PVR texture compression support. OpenAL is also widely supported. However, you will need to do a lot boilerplate stuff on your own, or use some cross platform lib; and then you will need Objective-C to glue everything together at some point, which means using Xcode/Mac anyway. [/quote] There is much to digest in your response; thank you. And the $900 is the difference in cost (savings) between the Apple product and the Windows machine, not the total cost of the Apple product.
  3. How crucial is iOS/ OS X experience?

    [quote name='Tom Sloper' timestamp='1306388399' post='4815912'] [quote name='WaywardSquanderer' timestamp='1306350894' post='4815722']is it enough for a game dev studio to see that a prospective hire has worked on Android and Windows Phone 7? [/quote] Not if the studio develops for Playstation3 or Nintendo. Read [url="http://www.sloperama.com/advice/lesson49.htm"]FAQ 49[/url]. [/quote] Mr. Sloper, evidently I must apologize for a poorly worded ( or "dumb" as stated in your blog) question. In retrospect, what I had intended to ask was whether not having iOS experience (while having WP7 and Android experience) would be cause for a mobile game developer to discount my resume or job inquiry. An even better question would be to ask "How significant is the difference among developing for iOS v. WP7/Android?" Is the learning curve steep? Is it so steep that a prospective employer would rather not spend time allowing someone to train or learn the environment? Also, I failed to specify that the original question was referencing mobile game devs. I can see how this would be confusing as I'd stated that I also hope to eventually participate in "AAA" development. I'd like to point out that I hate using the phrase "AAA" as it seems to imply that mobile games are not serious undertakings, which I know is generally not the case. I believe that there are valuable gameplay experiences that can be had from PCs, consoles, mobile platforms and web browsers. I am just trying to plan ahead to take into consideration the trend (anecdotal or not) of the industry moving towards smaller teams working on smaller projects. Two inferences you make of laziness and trying to cut corners are unnecessary and insulting. I'm aware of your disclaimer of applying the contents of the article to the reader's situation (such as my not being lazy), however statements of judgement like these are still distracting from the point you are trying to make. You also state there being a problem with the "naivete behind the question". A question is generally asked because of naivete, i.e. having a lack of judgement, experience or information. To be bothered by this encourages people to remain naive and ignorant, which is actually more dumb than asking a 'dumb question'. I think it is fair to say that $900 is a significant amount of money. As well, trying to maximize the utility of the dollar by getting as high quality as possible for a reasonable price, i.e. the difference between getting the cheapest Mac machine v. an equivalently priced but more powerful PC, is also a reasonable action. I refer to the wisdom of loom_weaver, jbadams and the first statment in your comment in this regard. The product in question is really a means to an end, with that end being the development of software that will hopefully aid in my being employed in game development. Thus, having experience with a certain technology will probably not outweigh having a portfolio well designed code and projects written for other platforms, unless the employer works primarily with that technology. Lastly, I want you to know that I have visited your website on a few occasions and have found it useful. I do take your point that nothing is enough. A better way to state this might be: "you only need to meet the qualifications of the resume, bring more to the table than the competition, impress someone enough to offer you a job without your inquiry, patience, luck, and a strong professional network." That seems like a sufficient starting point. Again, I apologize for the lack of clarity in my original question, hence the length of this response.
  4. How crucial is iOS/ OS X experience?

    [quote name='jbadams' timestamp='1306387991' post='4815911'] If you're going for a job specifically creating games for iOS then obviously a developer with actual iOS experience would be preferred over one without, but in the general case simply showing you have the ability to learn how to target different platforms should be sufficient assuming you are otherwise qualified (relevant degree, portfolio, ability to answer interview question, etc.). Unless you're specifically interested in a studio that does a lot of iOS work I would go with the purchase you're more happy to make for now -- you can always pick up the hardware and experience for iOS development later. If you're just after a portfolio piece that runs on iOS hardware you could also consider [url="http://www.gamedev.net/page/resources/_/reference/programming/game-programming/300/developing-a-mobile-application-with-flash-r2797"]targeting that platform with Flash[/url] -- not quite the same thing, but it may still give you a leg up over someone with no iOS-based portfolio piece, and shows you can take the hardware requirements into consideration and work with different tool-sets. [/quote] I think I will also do some research on the Unity3D engine, as it seems that it is designed to aid in multi-platform deployment.
  5. How crucial is iOS/ OS X experience?

    [quote name='loom_weaver' timestamp='1306359549' post='4815782'] It depends on the studio. If they create iOS games then having experience in that area is a big plus (and you'll probably need a Mac to get this). That being said, your skills as a developer, portfolio, and interview ability is what really matters, not what laptop you use. [/quote] Thank you for your well stated point. I suppose iOS is more crucial for a dev studio that works exclusively with iOS, though I wonder if such a place exists. As well, I will attempt to install the Mac OS X on a non-Mac machine and/or virtually.
  6. How crucial is iOS/ OS X experience?

    Macs are expensive. Installing OS X on a non-Apple machine is a pain in the arse for a noob. I think it is fair to say that indie development is on the rise and part of that includes deploying a game to as many platforms as possible. While OS X has a small market share in the PC environment, iOS is a very popular mobile platform. So, is it enough for a game dev studio to see that a prospective hire has worked on Android and Windows Phone 7? Is OS X or iOS development different enough such that an employer wouldn't want to bother with a new hire's learning curve if they haven't worked with it before? I'm having a bit of a dilemma here, as I am considering a purchase of an HP laptop with superior specs (except screen res and Thunderbolt port) and $900 cheaper than the high end MacBook Pro 15 in. I've looked into how to install OS X on the laptop and none of it is straight forward and much more hassle than I want to deal with at this point. So would this $900 Apple taxed machine with inferior hardware be a worthy investment in my future, presuming that future is in game dev? While I would like to work in "AAA" development eventually, I'd rather be prepared for as many jobs as possible in game development. I'm aware that I'm not including premium design features (aluminum body, high quality track pad, etc.) that Mac owners use to justify the price in this discussion. I believe that those things are luxuries that I don't need. I have no disdain for Apple products, and I do in fact want a Macbook Pro. I just can't justify spending that much money for OS X, a Thunderbolt connector and otherwise inferior specs. Unless of course it will give me a significant edge in a job interview...
  7. Hello all, Unfortunately, I must choose between two courses in my Comp Sci grad program: Distributed Systems and Parallel Computing. The choice will be decided by which is more applicable to game development. My grad coordinator suggested that parallel programming was more suited to massively parallel tasks and that distributed systems would be more practical. The course descriptions follow: Dist. Systems: [color=#513127][font="Arial"][size="2"]An introduction to the study of distributed systems. The course covers distributed system architectures such as client-server and peer-to-peer, distributed system design issues such as communication, fault tolerance, coordination, and deadlock, distributed system middleware such as Remote Method Invocation (RMI) and Tuple space, and the theory of distributed algorithms such as logical clocks and leader election. Programming projects are required. [/size][/font][/color] Parallel Comp.:[color=#513127][font="Arial"][size="2"]A study of the hardware and software issues in parallel computing. Topics include an introduction to the basic concepts, parallel architectures and network topologies, parallel algorithms, parallel metrics, parallel languages, network topology, granularity, applications, parallel programming design and debugging. Programming projects will be required.[/size][/font][/color]
  8. ideas for expert system

    [quote name='blewisjr' timestamp='1301085933' post='4790479'] [quote name='WaywardSquanderer' timestamp='1301083324' post='4790470'] In my Computer Science course I am to develop an expert system. Whenever I can I try to make my projects game related in the hopes of building a portfolio. I do not intend to use the project in the portfolio, but hopefully it will provide a starting point for another project. Regardless, I would very much appreciate ideas on feasible (able to be completed in 3 - 4 weeks) applications for an expert system. On a side note, evidently the Plus membership over at AIGameDev.com does not allow you to read or write on the forums. Thanks in advance for polite, constructive suggestions! Update: I believe I probably should have posted this in the Beginner's section, as I am a noob. Unless someone can tell me how to move this post over to that section without double posting, it's here unfortunately [/quote] Sent a report in for a move. My advice to take expert systems to the game world would have to be naturally adapting AI. Expert Systems in Real Time applications need to evolve to constantly changing data over time. So if I understand it properly an AI that makes decisions based off of how the player plays would classify as an expert system because it needs to evolve as the player evolves to keep a consistent challenge. The goal however for it to be an expert system means the AI can't cheat it needs to actually adapt its decisions to what the player is doing to scale the difficulty not just making it do more damage or have more health but tactical decisions. This would be a great system in say a simple 2D RTS game where the AI can actually make tactical decisions. [/quote] Thanks for sending in the report and the suggestion. You've got me thinking about creating an expert system for the board game Diplomacy. I've heard some compare it to Risk. I think the compelling aspect would be in entering alliances (which is a main feature of the game); the expert system could take into account the player's propensity and motivation to 'backstab' in such situations. I have no idea what I'm doing but it already sounds fun!
  9. ideas for expert system

    [quote name='nfries88' timestamp='1301102486' post='4790549'] Well, I'm not too sure what you mean by "expert", but... I recommend making a text-based game where you type messages as if you were talking to someone, and it returns with a whitty or sarcastic comment. I would get a kick out of it; at least, and I suppose that's one aspect of AI programming, right? (this isn't really my field of expertise...) [/quote] Its funny you mention that. Bruce Wilcox from TellTale Games used an expert system for his Loebner Prize winning 'chatbot' (used for lack of a better term). From what I understand it is to be used in one form or another in their adventure games for dialog features.
  10. ideas for expert system

    [quote name='alexjc' timestamp='1301085511' post='4790478'] [quote name='WaywardSquanderer' timestamp='1301083324' post='4790470']On a side note, evidently the Plus membership over at AIGameDev.com does not allow you to read or write on the forums.[/quote] Seems like it's a bug, I'm looking into it. Sorry for the trouble. You should be able to read and write with a simple introduction, whether or not you're PLUS... Alex [/quote] I feel the need to clarify my statement about AIGameDev.com; I just wanted to head off any suggestions for me to post on that site (as I'd already attempted) and I'm afraid my words, from a business standpoint, may have come across as a slam on the service of the site. This definitely was not my intention. Alex took care of the bug and I am now enjoying the forums very much! If you haven't checked it out yet, and you're reading this, then you definitely have to.
  11. ideas for expert system

    In my Computer Science course I am to develop an expert system. Whenever I can I try to make my projects game related in the hopes of building a portfolio. I do not intend to use the project in the portfolio, but hopefully it will provide a starting point for another project. Regardless, I would very much appreciate ideas on feasible (able to be completed in 3 - 4 weeks) applications for an expert system. On a side note, evidently the Plus membership over at AIGameDev.com does not allow you to read or write on the forums. Thanks in advance for polite, constructive suggestions! Update: I believe I probably should have posted this in the Beginner's section, as I am a noob. Unless someone can tell me how to move this post over to that section without double posting, it's here unfortunately
  12. Professional Networking at PAX East

    Pretty much what I was thinking. I appreciate the feedback!
  13. Hello all, This is my first post. I'm a computer science student looking to acquire some game dev skills. I am attending PAX East on Friday 3/11 with a friend and we had a bit of a debate. He intends to hand out business cards, but I don't feel comfortable doing that just yet because I really don't have anything to show. I'd rather make my name known when I can direct any developers to a website that actually has content. My plan is to hit up a few of the industry lectures and meet some of the smaller devs, e.g. Twisted Pixel, Red5 and maybe even Bethesda. So my first question to anyone out there is this: is it best to just get your name out there or should you be primed and hireable (or at the very least, have started a portfolio)? And here's my general question: What advice do you have for a rookie looking to make the best of his time (professionally ) at PAX East? I have not started a portfolio yet because I've been entirely focused on excelling at my school work, which has nothing to do with gaming. I have earned straight A's in both quarters.