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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Tony Sharp

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  1. [quote name='rip-off' timestamp='1324339164' post='4895540']Unfortunately, no such high level input exists in SDL. You need to do it yourself, or find a higher level library (possibly written in terms of SDL).[/quote] That sucks... I may just have to look for another cross-platform multimedia library, or just make a CLI-based game. Trying to connect everything to these graphics is the only thing that's getting in my way. [quote]For instance, you could have a collection of rectangles, and write or find a function that can do a point/rectangle intersection test. You need to listen for mouse events, and test the mouse pointer position against this rectangle set when a click or drag is detected.[/quote] Very clever. I'll look around for some non-SDL tutorials to detail this. [quote]It is hard to give more than a broad overview to such a broad question. The details are up to you - but given how far you've gotten you should be capable. If you have a specific question about how to achieve any particular piece of this puzzle then it will be easier to provide a more detailed answer. [/quote] I just want the mouse to work with the board. When the player clicks a spot, I want a piece to show up in that spot. And once the computer calculates its move, I want a piece to show up there. I'll eventually figure it out. You've pointed me in a better direction. Thank you for your time and help.
  2. After hours of trying to figure this out on my own, I've given up... I need help. I'm making a board game. All the "hard work" like graphics, gameplay, AI are done. The only thing that's in my way now are mouse events. I haven't been able to find a tutorial that gets to the point of what I'm trying to do. How do I define the coordinates of a clickable area on a graphic (my board image)? And how do I give the user control to put pieces in that area? Your help would be greatly appreciated.
  3. [quote name='bluehailex' timestamp='1322514965' post='4888579'] [quote name='Tony Sharp' timestamp='1322511720' post='4888562'] The designs and gameplay for my game are done, and the image elements are saved. I have some experience with C++, but very little experience with SDL. To get things started, I'd like to know how to load my [i]board.png[/i] file into a window as a background. Your help would be greatly appreciated. [/quote] [url="http://lazyfoo.net/SDL_tutorials/lesson01/index2.php"]This[/url] is a pretty good tutorial that will show you how to get an image on the screen, but if you want support for PNG files you will want to follow up with [url="http://lazyfoo.net/SDL_tutorials/lesson03/index.php"]this[/url] tutorial. The [url="http://lazyfoo.net/SDL_tutorials/index.php"]site[/url] also has other tutorials if you want to learn more about SDL. [/quote] Thank you for the links. After I figure out how to get SDL to work in Ubuntu 11.10, I'll get started. Edit: Finally got it working. Woot woot.
  4. The designs and gameplay for my game are done, and the image elements are saved. I have some experience with C++, but very little experience with SDL. To get things started, I'd like to know how to load my [i]board.png[/i] file into a window as a background. Your help would be greatly appreciated.
  5. I want to make a board game with Python. The gameplay design is done, and the board and pieces are saved as .png files. I have some experience with Python, but I don't know much about using it through a graphical interface. My Problem: I want stuff to happen when the player takes their mouse and clicks on a spot on the board. [img]http://public.gamedev.net/public/style_emoticons/default/laugh.gif[/img] Your help would be greatly appreciated. Edit: I figured it out. I needed a framework. Using pygame now.
  6. [quote name='jyk' timestamp='1303363734' post='4801107'] Oh, sorry, I missed the 'mobile devices' part. That changes things somewhat. But, the free version is definitely functional. Playing around with the free version a bit should definitely give you an idea of the engine's capabilities and allow you to compare it to the other engines you're considering. [/quote] After spending the last few days with the free version of Unity, I see now why it costs as much as it does. It's definitely the most refined and complete package for independent game development. It's very impressive, and I think I'm going to stick with it. Thanks again folks for the help.
  7. [quote name='jyk' timestamp='1303361686' post='4801091'] [quote name='Tony Sharp' timestamp='1303360752' post='4801084']I checked out Unity3D, and was really impressed with the features, cross-platform abilities, and so on, but I had a hard time coming to terms the hefty price tag. That's a point I forgot to clarify in my OP. I'd like to get a game engine that offers a complete professional package for under $2,000. [/quote] Unless things have changed recently, the pro version of Unity falls within your specified price range.[/quote] On their site they list a different pro version for each platform. Unity Pro is $1,500, and iOS + Android Pro totals to $3,000. I can get the same compatible and features from ShiVa3D for only $1,500. I have no idea how it compares to Unity in terms of ease of use and stability though. [quote]Also, in addition to the pro version, there's also a free version of Unity. The pro version has some features that the free version doesn't, but the free version is fully functional and might be worth at least taking a look at. [/quote] I assumed since the Pro versions were so expensive that the free version was completely stripped of features. After taking a closer look, I see I might have assumed wrong. I'll get the free version now. Thanks!
  8. [quote name='Promit Roy' timestamp='1303360209' post='4801080'] Look at Unity3D. [/quote] Thank you for the reply. I checked out Unity3D, and was really impressed with the features, cross-platform abilities, and so on, but I had a hard time coming to terms the hefty price tag. That's a point I forgot to clarify in my OP. I'd like to get a game engine that offers a complete professional package for under $2,000.
  9. [quote]What language would I be best off learning next, considering my experience with LSL?[/quote] For iOS games you'll need to learn Objective-C. [quote]Unity3D and Unreal engines. Which is better for iPhone games? I have played with the Unreal engine a little already and the scripting is quite confusing and there's quite the lack of total-newbie-friendly tutorials.[/quote] Unreal can produce higher quality results, but Unity3D is more "affordable" (in my opinion). I've been looking at the [url="http://www.stonetrip.com/"]ShiVa3D[/url] and [url="http://www.esenthel.com/"]Esenthel[/url] engines. I'm kind of a noob myself, so I'm not sure how popular they are for iOS, but they do offer iOS compatibility. [quote]Conversion. Unity3D seems to have really good documentation and I am tempted to try it, but I do not have the funds to buy the IOS version. If I could create the game I want to make for a pc version (like with arrow keys representing the tilting of the iPhone), then give it to an apps development company... how difficult would it be for them to convert it to work on the iPhone?[/quote] I'm not sure. If installing iOS compatibility for Unity is all you need to do, you'd probably only have to optimize the graphics to fit within the ram and screen resolution limits.
  10. To make a long story short: I went to college for animation, spent the last 10 years doing photography, and now I'd like to do some game development. I still know how to animate and make character models, so that's not a problem. But I know very little about programming, and my math is a little rusty. However... I am willing to learn C++ and Trig if I absolutely have to. I've spent the majority of the evening researching game engines. For my first serious game I think I'd like to start with something simple like a 3D tower defense for desktop. And once I finish that, I'd like to do something a little more "involved" for mobile devices. The [url="http://www.stonetrip.com/"]ShiVa3D[/url] and [url="http://www.esenthel.com"]Esenthel[/url] engines look very nice. They both run on Windows and Mac, and can produce very high quality graphics. But I was wondering if there were any other (maybe easier) options I should research and consider. Your help would be greatly appreciated.