JosephParrilla

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About JosephParrilla

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  1. How to start?

    [quote name='kintantee' timestamp='1322870969' post='4889964'] [quote name='Joe P' timestamp='1322862948' post='4889928'] You couldn't possibly be more wrong about C++. If you think you can become an "expert" in 6 months, you are in a wild dream. It is very nice that you are a "fast learner", but thats irrelevant. Being stubborn is not the way to go here. Theres nothing wrong with wanting to make an engine, if that is your true goal. If your goal is to just make games, you should pick a language you know well, and pick an engine/framework that fits the level of abstraction you want and just get on with it. Being a language elitist will get you nowhere. Unless you have been making games for a while, I really dont see you running into performance issues in a language like C#. Trust me friend, the attitude that you have is going to take you nowhere... be humble and smart when it comes to your tools, youll be happy you did. [/quote] No offense but as an engineering student, there is no way you can engineer something with C#. I'm not an language elitist but C# is just some bullshit that is made by a company who seeks only it's own interest rather than community. The problem is not performance issue, I want to learn something useful later in my life and I don't see C# will be useful for me. In addition, I didn't say I will be an expert in 6 months. I just said I can hit advanced level in 6 months. You can check an english dictionary if you think advanced and expert have smilar meaning. Finally, I really don't need your help other than technical issues. Please, keep your opinions to yourself other than those related with my question Thank you for your contribution in this thread. [/quote] Ok I'm done here, this has no hope... good luck :/
  2. How to start?

    [quote name='kintantee' timestamp='1322502109' post='4888504'] [quote name='Gamer Gamester' timestamp='1322426143' post='4888200'] Also, C++ isn't a language that you can quickly pick up (even if you know other languages). It's a language that [b]seems[/b] like you can quickly pick it up... until several years have gone by and you still haven't finished anything and decide for the n++ time that you have even more C++ studying to do. I'd highly recommend considering other languages. Don't be mesmerized by C++'s "power".... power is relative. C++ may have a high level of run-time power, but development-time power is usually the critical factor in whether or not your would-be game ever exists. [/quote] I really really doubt C++ will take more than 6 months for me to hit advanced level. First, I'm a fast learner, second, I'm an advanced C programmer. Besides, hardest thing while learning a programming language is programming logic rather than language's tools. Also, if you're suggesting starting with C# or something, they are too "high level" for me. When it comes to power, C is even more powerful but it's not suitable for modern software development techniques unless you're going for system programming. one more note: Software development != learning a language. [quote name='ELawson' timestamp='1322418537' post='4888159'] I am going to have to agree with Tom Sloper. Starting from the beginning is a very bad idea, especially starting out. Unless you think you and your friend can make an engine better than what is out there. (Which is possible, but doubtful) Grab an existing engine and start working. Now, as far as the giving up on opengl you do understand that OpenGL is NOT an engine right? It's just a graphics API , the same is true for DirectX. By the way, you should avoid asking publicly which you should use, its just throwing troll feed on the ground. In my experience most of the tutorial books (including the SuperBible) that pertain to Graphic APIs just to get you familiar with gfx pipeline. If you try to make a sizable game with those tutorials your wont get much performance out of it. To your teachers credit, the best advice he gave was Start SMALL. Do not get stricken with "All we have to do syndrome". It's the killer of so many projects. Your average [u]console[/u] game take about 1.5 years with about 20 people working on it (not just programmers). So you and your friend are going to be very very busy Good Luck and wish you both the best [/quote] by "console" , you mean a game console(like ps3) or the command line? [/quote] You couldn't possibly be more wrong about C++. If you think you can become an "expert" in 6 months, you are in a wild dream. It is very nice that you are a "fast learner", but thats irrelevant. Being stubborn is not the way to go here. Theres nothing wrong with wanting to make an engine, if that is your true goal. If your goal is to just make games, you should pick a language you know well, and pick an engine/framework that fits the level of abstraction you want and just get on with it. Being a language elitist will get you nowhere. Unless you have been making games for a while, I really dont see you running into performance issues in a language like C#. Trust me friend, the attitude that you have is going to take you nowhere... be humble and smart when it comes to your tools, youll be happy you did.
  3. Python/Pygame or C#/XNA

    [quote name='Levistus' timestamp='1313359664' post='4849137'] Been looking around for python games and seems they usually look ugly. or maybe they don't have graphic artists. I forgot Kingdom Rush was made by a bunch of people. Will it cost me to develop games using C# + XNA or can I make the games I like with the free versions of Visual Studio? I'm still a student, maybe I can get Visual Studio Pro for Free from MS Dreamspark. [/quote] The look of a game has nothing to do with the programming language and framework. The art will only be as good as the artist creating it. Dont ever judge a programming language or platform based on the way that the existing games made with it look. As a beginner, any language/framework you choose will be powerful enough. The last thing you need to worry about is the "power" of the language. You are not going to push ANY programming language to its processing limits with your games at this point, so dont worry about it. What you should be worried about is ease of learning/ minimal frustration, as well as a solid community to help you out.
  4. dilemma

    [quote name='Serapth' timestamp='1313098998' post='4847941'] [quote name='Joe P' timestamp='1313097984' post='4847931'] [quote name='Serapth' timestamp='1313093526' post='4847877'] Not to be a semantics dick, but that wasn't a dilemma. Oh, guess I am being a semantics dick after all, isn't that ironic, don't you think? [/quote] I concur, you damn semantics dick. [/quote] Actually, you used the verb form, to be semantically correct you should have used the adjective form "damned". Hey, if I am going to embrace semantic dickery, I'm going all in! [/quote]
  5. dilemma

    [quote name='Serapth' timestamp='1313093526' post='4847877'] Not to be a semantics dick, but that wasn't a dilemma. Oh, guess I am being a semantics dick after all, isn't that ironic, don't you think? [/quote] I concur, you damn semantics dick.
  6. Hey guys, I'm REALLY new to this.

    Age really isnt the reason he shouldn't start with C++... C++ is the reason he shouldnt start with C++ Edit: Just realized you pointed that out Serapth
  7. Where to start 3D game programming?

    [quote name='TheCompBoy' timestamp='1313001634' post='4847271'] Can i read about making engines or is there som articles i can read about them? I am realy intrested in learning so much i can from this. [/quote] I wouldnt concentrate on "making engines"... just make games using a lower level framework.. and you will learn about engine stuff. My advice is to grab Microsoft XNA. Its a nice library that will help you do 3D stuff, but it wont cover up all of the details like a DarkGDK or Unity will. For me, I really like to mess around with tech, I tried out Unity... and it was just too far removed from the level I want to work at. Programs like that are targeting two types of audiences in my opinion.. Lone developers who just want to make games and dont want to worry about anything that doesnt interest them on the lower level... and teams of developers with artists and designers who need to be able to get stuff done and prefer to do things in a GUI environment with rapid prototyping... XNA does enough so that you dont need to go through pure DirectX calls, but it just leaves you alone and lets you be a programmer and learn everything about games from the ground up. For me, thats the fun of it. You can definitely be interested in both low level code and making finished games, biut you just need to adjust your expectations. By starting from the bottom, you have ALOT more work ahead of you than someone who is using an engine has. For me, my main interest is 2D games, so it helps that I dont need as much functionality as modern 3D games do. Because of this, I can use a lower level framework and be quite productive. If my goal was to make modern style games... something like a 3D shooter, doing it the way I work now would be ALOT more work.
  8. Where to start 3D game programming?

    [quote name='TheCompBoy' timestamp='1312999047' post='4847261'] So its more valuable for me to learn OpenGL than things like DarkGDK? [/quote] What are you interested in? Building games from the low level up? Or being a higher level designer? Using OpenGL will force you to write a lot of engine code... youll learn alot, but its highly technical and will take longer to make games. If youre more about the finished product and flashy games and you dont care about what happens on the lower level, use an engine. Only you know what is valuable to you.
  9. Where to start 3D game programming?

    If theres an openGL tutorial that teaches some 2D, just do it. Thats the basics of getting used to openGL, you cant expect to start creating moving 3d shapes with shadows and all that in the first line of code. You have to start from the beginning. also, darkGDK and OpenGL are different. Dark is a game development kit, it is not pure openGL programming.
  10. [quote name='Soap360' timestamp='1312948243' post='4847016'] I'll end this post off with saying thanks for realizing I don't have that passion that you all share. I've decided to major in law this semester. Thank you all [/quote] Well that was easy enough. Life saved..... Check
  11. C# Engine for Sandbox Game

    This is what I meant when I said it needs to be programmed. Im not really understanding how you expect to create a minecraft-esque world without some serious algorithms.
  12. C# Engine for Sandbox Game

    [quote name='RobotLong' timestamp='1312924470' post='4846895'] That's quite alright, I've actually been on these forums before a while ago and I've seen that. If you can't recommend an engine then would you advise sqlite to save the level data? Is that at all standard for save files or is there something else more appropriate for this? [/quote] Wait, didnt you say youve already usd Unity3D? I cant think of anything better. I mean the level editor is pretty much what you need, and the only other engine that comes close would be UDK. Ive never used Unity, but Ive watched tutorials... and it seems pretty drag and drop as far as models go. Then just attaching movement scripts to the Entities... if you have already used Unity, I think its just what you should continue with. As for as saving level data, I haven't done any multiplayer so I just use simple XML or .txt to save info like that.
  13. C# Engine for Sandbox Game

    [quote name='RobotLong' timestamp='1312923638' post='4846888'] I planned on building a terrain in the editor and then placing a bunch of props that I modeled such as foliage and rocks. The rendering of the world is already done by the engine and I won't have to program the graphics systems such as 3D rendering and lighting and such. That I'm not comfortable at all with. I don't want to build an engine, I just want to write code to add character interactions and the systems to save what the character has done (and maybe later networking). So no, I'm not programming a world really, If I was then yes I would not be comfortable. What I am comfortable with is writing all the code for those character interactions. Getting objects to spawn and snap to the terrain, rotating those objects, deleting objects, and then finally saving the objects. I'm fairly certain I can do that (I've already created a script in Unity 3D to spawn objects where I want while waiting for responses). So, I'm sorry if this comes out as being rude but I don't need advice on what kind of project I should be making as a beginner, I think this is within my reach. I do need help finding the right tools for the job though. Should I invest money in something that will be much easier/better or should I go with a free alternative? If you could answer that, I would be very appreciative. [/quote] Not my specialty, I work with a lot lower level tools and API's. And you have to understand that people post here EVERY DAY asking about engines, languages, etc when they have never written a single line of code in their life and should not be concerned with 3D yet. So Im sorry if my initial reaction is to ask where you stand.
  14. C# Engine for Sandbox Game

    [quote name='RobotLong' timestamp='1312922515' post='4846875'] Yeah, but in VB6 a long time ago. I'm not too worried about the programming personally. I just want to make a world where I can place/break things and move around and then save it. Then eventually add multiplayer and other gameplay elements. It would be a sandbox game in two aspects 1. You build stuff in a world 2. Its a testing ground for my learning of game programming. Also, if someone could recommend a database or file type to store the level that would be great too. I was planning on sqllite because I'm familiar with it but I'm worried about the performance. Although, unlike games like minecraft I wont be generating and saving the terrain in a bunch of blocks, just the objects that I place and create. [/quote] What do you mean by "I'm not too worried about the programming personally"? Is that meant to be like you are comfortable enough and confident enough not to worry.. or you just dont care about it? If its the latter than I think you will find yourself with a huge problem. You cant just "make" a world, you have to program the world... Im confused.