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JesseReiter

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  1. JesseReiter

    Introducing our protagonist, the mute.

    These are good points. I would add though that sometimes the feeling of being inconsequential can in fact be a compelling character trait (if your protagonist is, as in the FF7 example, the 'reluctant hero'). Just as PropheticEdge said, it's a narrative tool - and like any other, it can be effective or detrimental, depending on how it's executed.
  2. JesseReiter

    What makes an antagonist?

    I think the key to a really compelling antagonist is complexity. Someone who's a villain for villainy's sake to me isn't very interesting. I would argue that more often than not, the antagonist ends up being the driving force of the story: if the protagonist's main motivation is to thwart the antagonist, then the antagonist's motivations better be pretty damn interesting, or else you have a really vanilla story, The hero is on a journey of exploration and discovery that is dictated by his/her nemesis' motivations. I'm a firm believer that a villain should have just enough sympathetic qualities to make the audience feel conflicted, and the hero should likewise have just enough flaws to create that same feeling. Conflict is the essence of good fiction; the most impressive stories are able to make you identify with a character that isn't perfect - cause let's face it, perfect isn't interesting, and it doesn't require any risk.
  3. Just want to add that I checked this out and it's quite good I'd recommend it.
  4. JesseReiter

    Introducing our protagonist, the mute.

    I think it can be brilliant, if executed right. I remember being struck by Final Fantasy 7, how Cloud never spoke a word of dialogue but his lines were always implied in his body language, or the responses of other people in the scene. I sort of think that adding voice actors to the mix somewhat hurt the RPG... part of engaging in a fantasy game is having the freedom to inject the character with a bit of your own nuance. It's similar to the way reading creates an intensely intimate experience for the reader because everything is interpreted through your internal filters. That can be a powerful tool, imo.
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