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slippers2k

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  1. What kind of requirements do you have? Here are some points to consider: 1. Any restriction on programming language used? 2. How large/small should the program be? 3. Will the program be downloaded to a user's computer to play online? (Or do you simply load it onto a web browser to play?) 4. Is this a game you play against the computer, or against live people? Or both? 5. Do you prefer the DirectX or OpenGL API to render 3d hardware acceleration? 6. How much detail would you prefer in the scenery, cars, etc.? 7. What is the target pc/online requirement to play the game (for example, Pentium 3 at 800mhz, you need at least a 56k modem)? 8. Do you need to have a free and pay version of the game, or is this just going to be something offered up on a free gaming site like www.miniclip.com? Just some ideas to get you started.
  2. Hey all, I'm trying to use vbscript to create a program. The program will run in securecrt, which is a terminal program (runs ssh/telnet sessions). I am stuck, because in my program, I want to send the backspace keypress to my terminal screen, much like this: crt.Screen.Send BACKSPACE where BACKSPACE is the code required to send the backspace command. I have heard that you have to enter the ASCII code to send the command. (I don't think there is an escape sequence you can enter for backspace in securecrt.) Does anyone know how to send that code (whether it be decimal, octal, or hexadecimal notation) to the screen? Give you an example: crt.Screen.Send command 'code goes here, blah blah blah crt.Screen.Send BACKSPACE 'the code left something in the prompt 'I want to remove what's in the prompt before I do anything else 'other code, blah blah... Does anyone know an answer to this problem? Thanks for any help you can give.
  3. YES!!! I GOT IT!!! I would like to thank God, and Google, and perseverance for making this possible. Anyway, to make a pocketpc 2003 game using directional keys work in mobile 5.0, make sure you are refering to your directional keypad with System.Windows.Forms before each key command, like for example: private void keyDown(object sender, System.Windows.Forms.KeyEventArgs e) { keyArgs = e; if ((e.KeyCode == System.Windows.Forms.Keys.Up)) { // Up breadPlayerRectangle.Y -= generalSpeed; } if ((e.KeyCode == System.Windows.Forms.Keys.Down)) { // Down breadPlayerRectangle.Y += generalSpeed; } //etc... } (The rest of my key definitions are in another part of my code, but you get the picture above.) Once I tried this in my code, it worked. I am RELIEVED. Good night, people... it's past 3 in the morning in the Eastern Time Zone, and I'm going to bed. CASE CLOSED! God bless you, slippers2k
  4. Ok, I think I answered my own question. PocketPC 2003 and Windows Mobile 5.0 PocketPC specs differ slightly in one regard - the keypress events. Apparently, while I am not sure about the specifics, one operating system reads hardware keypress commands with the keyDown event, but the other operating system reads hardware keypress commands with the keyPress event. Sounds like a simple change of code, right? Wrong... there is a difference: keyDown is a variable that is used with a KeyEventArgs type, such as: private void System.Windows.Forms.KeyEventArgs keyArgs = null; but keyPress is a variable that is used with a KeyPressEventArgs type, such as: private void System.Windows.Forms.KeyPressEventArgs keyArgs2 = null; The keyArgs and keyArgs2 objects do not have the same members. keyArgs can reference something called KeyCode to find out what key got pressed on the device. However, keyArgs2 has (or is supposed to have) keyAscii, which is more or less supposed to do the same thing. (Unless I missed my guess, and the KeyPressEventArgs keyArgs2 variable does have a KeyCode member... I didn't see one in Visual Studio when I was coding.) Feedback? I would like to know which event to code for so that my game will respond to hardware button presses on a 5.0 device (and a 2003 device as well). -slippers2k
  5. I think I just realized something. The problem could be due to one of a few things: 1. There is a difference between control scheme programming for pocketpc 2003 devices and windows mobile 5.0 devices... 2. There is a difference in control scheme programming between a windows smartphone and a pocketpc in general (sounds more obvious, but it didn't even give me compile-time errors when I ran the code) Does windows mobile 5.0 stop using GAPI commands? Did pocketpc 2003 ever use those for controlling games? I am stumped... -Ramon
  6. Hey all, I was porting a smartphone game to the pocketpc a while ago, and had trouble when I ran the game on my pocketpc. It's a pong remake, and while I don't have a smartphone device, I was able to get it running on the smartphone emulator that I had at home. When I got my pocketpc, I tried porting it to a pocketpc solution and actually compiled it with only one warning (a problem with a member of a high score window object, nothing else game-related). The only problem is that when I play the game, the pocketpc controls will not move the paddle to hit the ball. Are there any fundamental differences between programming user controls for the smartphone and the pocketpc? The port was almost flawless (I'm still somewhat impressed), but by the same token, the game is no fun without player control. Thank you for your time. Any input you can provide would be appreciated. Later! -slippers2k p.s. here are more technical specs for you taking notes: The pocketpc is an HP iPAQ rx1950 series, running windows mobile 5.0. I initially developed the game for the smartphone (windows smartphone 2003 edition), and ran it on a 2003 smarphone SE emulator in Visual Studio 2005 Beta 2. The emulator ran the program fine. I later tried to convert the program to compile for a 2003 PocketPC device, and was actually able to deploy it to my pocketpc, but again, the game will not move the player device (player controls the paddle to hit ball back to the computer).
  7. Okay... made my decision after I left to go out that weekend, and bought myself a pocketpc. I bought an HP, an iPAQ rx1950 (or rx1955, not sure). It's got wifi, no bluetooth (but I don't feel like I'm missing much, would've had to pay 100 bucks more for a model that the store did not have with it), and it's a nice home for my 1 gb sd card. I *definitely* want to program for pocketpc apps because of the absolute ease of use of the windows visual studio enterprise for mobile app development. frob: I tried programming on evc++ for mobile apps and discovered why I like visual studio so much - evc++ just does not want to work on my computer, period. I also like the growing pocketpc market. I'm also thinking about making games that will run on pocketpc and windows platforms. For now though, the majority of my attention will be brought to bear on making pocketpc games. I like the popularity they are beginning to get.
  8. Hey all, I spent a while thinking about this, and wanted to get your feedback, as it is quite possible that I might get a PocketPC handheld or Palm handheld today based on the outcome. I have been learning how to program for windows mobile for the last 3 months solid. I created a quick little snippet of a smartphone test app (which is basically pong, but with powerups), and converted it to a pocket pc format (I just have to clean up the code so it displays properly). I am also trying to start selling games through Handango.Com, and am feeling more confident in my ability to start creating fairly decent "cheapo" titles in the future (everything I sell on Handango will probably be $1 or less, no more than $5 at the most). My question is: am I selling to the right hardware? I'm torn between continuing to program for the pocketpc and sucking up the cost of one of those handhelds, or learning how to program for Palm handhelds and potentially re-learning the coding/compiling/deploying process for those machines. Windows may be the new kid on the block, but Palm handhelds are getting cheaper every day. (I have not forgotten Microsoft's powerful ability to throw money at its problems, however.) What is involved in programming for the Palm handhelds? Is is that much more complicated than using Visual Studio and the NETCompact framework for mobile devices like windows pocketpcs and smartphones? I would like to make mobile programs, but I also don't want to waste time programming for a device that I'm not going to get long-term exposure on. Thank you for reading my post. Happy New Year to you all, and thanks for any advice you can give. God bless you! -slippers2k
  9. Thanks for the assist. Tried it out though with code like this: example_str = std::getline(in_stream,param_string,'\n'); And I got this error: error C2679: binary '=' : no operator defined which takes a right-hand operand of type 'class std::basic_istream<char,struct std::char_traits<char> >' (or there is no acceptable conversion) I believe I've got a basic istream and a basic string. The '\n' is the delimiter character. What do I seem to be doing wrong here? This is literally the only error I am getting in my code. It is supposed to grab an entire line of text and put it into a string. Could it be because I am working with a file? Thanks for you help... -slippers2k
  10. I've been trying to figure this out for a little while now, but there seems to be no mention (online at least) of a way to read strings from a text file. What I mean is that typically I see getline code with char str[2000] ... //other defining code for (blah = 0; blah < end_of_file; blah++) in_stream.getline(str,2000); ... //other code, etc... but... I usually never see example getline code that looks like this... string example_str; for (blah = 0; blah < end_of_file; blah++) in_stream.getline(example_str); //etc. What is involved with making a getline function read to a string, instead of a character array? Why is it that my C++ compiler gives me an error message whenever I try to substitute a string for a character array pointer (which is almost essentially a string)? Thanks in advance for your assistance.
  11. I tried using what I thought was a crossover cable to hook up the pcs together through their network cards, but aside from slight recognition ("Limited or no connectivity") I was almost completely unable to get the network card to recognize in my old Windows 98 pc at all. I'm going to try to see if I can do a cd copy in AheadNERO tonight and see what comes up. If it doesn't work, that might convince me to try the network situation again. You never know... -slippers2k
  12. I recently bought a new computer, and am trying to copy my non-reproducible data (pictures, zipfiles, documents, projects) over to it from my old pc. I recently tried unsuccessfully to set up a home network to transfer files that way, and decided instead to burn those files to cds to simply copy into the new computer. Unfortunately, I hit a major speed bump. My old computer uses a PacketCD format to be able to drag and drop files to a cd from the computer. My new computer uses Windows XP, and unfortunately does not recognize this type, even though PacketCD format is normally supposed to be recognized accross the board (as a UDF format). I made the mistake of deleting some of the information I had copied. I'm not up the creek completely, as I could very well use the AheadNERO software I have to do a 1:1 cd copy on the old system to create a cd which would most likely be recognized by Windows, but I'd like to see if I can find a solution which would not involve me burning another cd. A potential candidate I located was Isobuster, a program which, when I installed the trial version on my new pc, was able to instantly read the information I had burned on the cd (previously when I stuck the cd in, Win XP treated it like a blank disc). Only problem? I have to pay to get it registered. Don't get me wrong - if I had the money in hand and the capacity to register it immediately I most likely would have. I just don't have the money in hand right now. Does anyone know any freeware programs that act like Isobuster? I am NOT interested in pirate software. I simply want to get the files read and put on my new pc. I am fairly confident that the AheadNERO program I got with my new LG CD-RW drive (which is installed in my OLD pc) will put the information on my NEW computer in a readable format. It's just that for some reason, the iteration of XP that I got (and perhaps the fact that my new pc is set up for the NTFS filesystem) does not read packet cd systems. Thanks for your time.
  13. If you know in advance that you are going to be designing any kind of game as a series of games (a trilogy or any n-part series otherwise), what are areas you really want to focus on? If I was to design a trilogy myself, I'd figure I'd try to preserve a singular focus through all three games, tying them together. From that singular focus, each game would have its own theme, which would branch out into separate parts of the whole which help make each game's overall theme work. The "first" Star Wars trilogy is something of an example of this, albeit the fact that it is a movie first. I am also a fan of most anime storytelling in that it layers stories on top of each other, although this is getting off track somewhat. Rephrasing the big question, what is a crucial aspect to a trilogy that needs to be preserved through the course of the design? Is storyline necessarily the most important aspect?
  14. What do you think are some of the more innovative and respectable design bits of games present and games of the past? Games that I've played such as Descent, Half-Life, Flight Simulator, and Tokyo Extreme Racer have all had interesting game design in some form or another. (Of course, they all have their flaws too.) I'm a big fan of the open-city driving environment, if only for the simple fact that I've been used to it all the time with Microsoft Flight Simulator letting you fly wherever you want. I picked Descent because of the simple idea of a spacecraft-based first person shooter where you were shooting bots, and Tokyo Extreme Racer was all about racing on realistic city highways (I own TXR 1 and 2 for the Dreamcast). What do you really think is missing from the current games released? I usually cheer for the unique and innovative games released (like Katamari Damacy) because are risk-takers, and game publishers need to know that individuality can be embraced as easily as Final Fantasy 35. -slippers2k
  15. Does anyone know when the next game programming convention is going to be in either the greater Philadelphia PA or New Jersey / New York metro areas? I'd really be interested in attending one if they have things like programming contests in them, or clinics for game programming, things of that nature. Anyone have any info? Thanks for your time. -slippers2k