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bloodisblue

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  1. It seems like the algorithm used is this g(y) = g(x) + dist(x; y) so it would always attempt to go diagonally first and than level off because that would shorten the distance to the target earlier in the program. This is why the first thing the algorithm would do is go diagonally until it reaches either the end of the wall or the goal node and than continue going horizontal.
  2. I think that doing a simulation of many randomized shots and then picking the best one would work pretty well. If you calculated where the balls would all end up before starting the animation of the players shot you would have the entire graphical animation period to do some calculations along with the normal computer move making time. With 100 shots you would probably end up with something decent especially if you have parameters like minimum of 50% power which would prevent 0 power options from taking up computing time.
  3. Also if you have a local Barnes and Nobles or bookstore similar to it nearby you could always stop by and skim through several of the books offered there and if the price is better on amazon order it online. I don't really have any suggestions for C# but doing this actually convinced me not to buy a book that I was considering buying on an impulse do to several good reviews on amazon.
  4. First off I would read the FAQ in the Multiplayer section, it should help out a bit do not skip over #0 it is very relevant in this case-- [url="http://www.gamedev.net/index.php?app=forums&module=forums&section=rules&f=15"]http://www.gamedev.net/index.php?app=forums&module=forums&section=rules&f=15[/url] Also the only thing I've heard of that can work on most of those platforms is Unity -- [url="http://unity3d.com/unity/"]http://unity3d.com/unity/[/url] I haven't personally tried it out that much however I have heard very good things about it so I'd say learn how to use that rather than the languages you need to know.
  5. For drives I'd also probably want to add in challenge / difficulty. One of the games which I currently am having a lot of fun with is Desktop Dungeons, a 2d rpg style game where you have to beat all the monsters on one board. ([url="http://www.desktopdungeons.net/"]http://www.desktopdungeons.net/[/url]) it is very difficult to complete a level which makes it both entertaining and replayable. This aspect is much more difficult to design seeing how often players simply use frequent saves to avoid the difficult portions of the game such as stalling to discover a bosses weakness vs reloading until you learn it. This may seem kind of cliche but to encourage players to explore the caves / kill all monsters if you give rewards such as different skins/textures for items (like make your sword have a permanent glow effect its up to you). These types of small perks tend to give players a sense of completion and will make them want to try out their newly unlocked skins making the game slightly more replayable.
  6. From what I've seen hitboxes are pretty much the way to go for 2D sidescrollers. Check out this video [url="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0eZg4b1jNow&feature=related"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0eZg4b1jNow&feature=related[/url] it shows hitboxes for Kirby in Super Smash Bros Melee, a very high end game which still uses hit boxes. The way to make the collisions seem realistic would probably be to create physics which push the things apart from each other when they collide which would look pretty natural.
  7. Whats happening is exactly what you said it is. You get inside the rectangle and since you will always stop the movement you can't get out. You can fix this just like you said by either pushing your guy outside the box. (Shouldn't be that hard if you use Force Vectors originating from the rectangle). Or you could check for the collision before the movement actually takes place. Also good luck!
  8. QUICK EDIT: You didn't read any of the forum FAQs did you... You literally posted this right after you signed up for an account. Quickly go and read all the forum FAQs, they will give you a better starting idea of how hard it is to make a game. Well first off, you probably will not be able to come anywhere close to finishing this if it is your first project (which it sounds like it is) and you try to jump straight into it. I'd start off with much simpler things like pong and such. Also steam is very selective with the games which they allow on their servers. However I'll still answer some of your questions. Unity [url="http://unity3d.com/"]http://unity3d.com/[/url] it is a free, easy to use game development engine. I believe it probably has ways to implement pre made AI which is something you are looking for. It also doesn't cost anything and can be commercial. The 1500 dollar limit is mainly for companies making over 100,000 dollars (Don't worry about this at all). [url="http://www.blender.org/"]http://www.blender.org/[/url] it is a 3d modeling program. It is really hard to use and I personally gave up on my first day trying it out. If you stick with it however I believe it is a pretty strong program for its free price tag. [url="http://yoyogames.com/gamemaker/windows"]http://yoyogames.com/gamemaker/windows[/url] probably the easiest program to make 2D games in. Though its no where near easy, don't get those two confused. Overall though I'd tell you to work on smaller projects. Rather than even start with mario start with something simple like pong or break out. Then maybe move onto asteroids. Keep building. If you start off to high up you will probably give up out of frustration. It is a lot more work to make a game then you think. Playing them does not really mean that you can make them very well. Also I wouldn't try to sell your first game at all. You would be lucky if people download it for free, let alone pay for it. [url="http://www.rpgmakerweb.com/"]http://www.rpgmakerweb.com/[/url] probably would be more fun then trying to use all the other things.
  9. [url="http://wiki.garrysmod.com/?title=Lua_Tutorial_Series"]http://wiki.garrysmo...Tutorial_Series[/url] here is a Lua tutorial guides for Garry's Mod. Please note that it will be a lot of work to do. I haven't really tried it ever. [url="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_3EmDOXZs6c"]http://www.youtube.c...h?v=_3EmDOXZs6c[/url] here is an example MMORPG type game made using it. BTW Garry's Mod is more of a game which can be modded using Lua which is what these people did. And also please read the FAQ on gamedev.net making an MMORPG as your first project is unrealistic. Making one as your 50th project alone is still unrealistic and I noticed you made your first post before you were even signed up for an hour...
  10. Try Garry's Mod. I'm pretty sure it has everything you are looking for and you can host a server for about 20-30 dollars per month which can have many people playing on it.
  11. I'm just kind of curious, but if you had a system like this wouldn't it spend a lot more time rendering seeing how you would have to check for each individual pixels change of collision group as it is updated? From what I think you are saying is to make a couple more calls per pixel to check for the change of collision group. These calls I'd think would take far more time then your quadTree calls which would take far fewer calls to check for the collisions.
  12. Similarly to what Wooh said you want to check your own code. You want to make sure that you are formatting the images when loading them, not when drawing them. When drawing you would have to constantly reformat. Also I would look for potential leaks because SDL is most likely fast enough.
  13. Well it looks like what you have here is something like this if(leftCollision == 1){ do stuff here} if(rightCollision == 1){do stuff here} if(anything done == true){ if(leftCollision == 0 && rightCollision == 0){ Move Ball here } } It looks like your problem is that you never get to that point. For example in order to make left_up = true leftCollision would have to be 1. In order to move the ball leftCollision would have to be 0. Hence you can never reach the part of the code where it should be moving. This should give you a clue on how to proceed. Also as a little side note you might want to start putting indents after every if statement, your current code is really hard to read and tell what is happening.
  14. I don't really have any good tutorials or anything for you, except a while ago I was trying to create my own level editor and ended up creating a little thing which allowed me to read / write from a text file [code]public Level(int levelXInBlocks, int levelYInBlocks, int levelNumber){ levelComposition = new Block[levelXInBlocks][levelYInBlocks]; System.out.println(levelComposition); levelX = levelXInBlocks; levelY = levelYInBlocks; this.levelNumber = levelNumber; setLevel(levelNumber); } public void setLevel(int levelNumber){ String[] eachLine = new String[128]; try{ FileReader fr = new FileReader("level" + levelNumber + ".txt"); BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(fr); String record = new String(); int lineOn = 0; System.out.println("Loading level " + levelNumber); while((record = br.readLine()) != null){ eachLine[lineOn] = record; lineOn += 1; } } catch(IOException e){ System.out.println("No file found "); } generateBlocks(eachLine); } /* o = air = 0 b = brick = 1 i = ice = 2 */ public void generateBlocks(String[] levelNotation){ for(int i = 0; i < levelY; i ++){ System.out.println(levelNotation[i]); String tempS = levelNotation[i].toLowerCase(); char[] c = tempS.toCharArray(); for(int blockCounter = 0; blockCounter < c.length; blockCounter++){ char tempC = c[blockCounter]; if(tempC == 'o'){ levelComposition[blockCounter][i] = new Block(0); } else if(tempC == 'b'){ levelComposition[blockCounter][i] = new Block(1); } else if(tempC == 'p'){ levelComposition[blockCounter][i] = new Block(0); p = new Player((blockCounter * 25),(i*25)); } else if(tempC == 'i'){ levelComposition[blockCounter][i] = new Block(2); } else if(tempC == 'f'){ levelComposition[blockCounter][i] = new Block(3); } else if(tempC == '<'){ levelComposition[blockCounter][i] = new Block(4); } } } }[/code] It only really applies to tile based maps, but it is pretty simple to read / write levels in a text document. The way I created the levels was by simply going into the text document and adding more "b"s or "i"s to place blocks. More recently I tried creating a game which I had a level editor and I placed objects in the levels which were written into a text file with all attributes which could be read with a text parser. It seemed like it would work correctly (I never found out an error which prevented it from running). Personally I've found GUIs to be really hard to build so you might want to stay away from them if you could help it. Or if anybody has a good way to create GUIs that would help you and me +Good luck on future projects!
  15. How much money do you have to pay all these people to work on a video game? Personally I would not work on a non hobby project for free. Also I believe you are in the wrong section, you should post here [url="http://www.gamedev.net/forum/8-help-wanted/"]http://www.gamedev.net/forum/8-help-wanted/[/url].