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Lain Rivers

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  1. Right, I was in the wrong forum to begin with I guess. I'm talking about learning an actual language and theory. I don't have the tools I need, that's why I was so confused why you would tell me to 'just code' when I don't know anything that allows me to 'just code'. I guess the official documents somewhat give me that, though I still think it's a bad way to learn your first language.
  2. Never mind. Wrong references idea, official docs are fine.
  3. Nevermind, had the wrong idea of what you meant by references. Sorry about getting defensive.
  4. EDIT: Please move to beginner forum. And since no one seems to know what I'm asking. Think of it as a curriculum. A path. I'd like some insight as to what path is normally followed while learning programming. Using python as an example, I was looking around for some solid books to learn from and I came up with the following categories. General language books - basics of programming/python language Intermediate books - intermediate language/real world programming concepts/larger projects Specialized books - GUI/web/network/Game programming using python Mathematics - Mathematical programming Algorithm/Data Structures - Algorithm and data structure programming Reference - Complete language reference I'm sure I could just go from language books to intermediate and then do whatever I feel like, but I tend to thrive on structure so I would like some core themes to follow as I learn programming. With subjects like programming there doesn't seem to be any standard progression to follow. I tend to get overwhelmed because I have no idea what programming can do or how to do them, all I've learned thus far are languages and basic programming concepts. I have a hard time understanding how I can go from basic programming to writing my very own program. What exactly are the next steps? Progression examples followed by book recommendations for those examples would be greatly appreciated.
  5. [quote name='szecs' timestamp='1354955378' post='5008431'] [quote name='KingofNoobs' timestamp='1354938654' post='5008352'] This may seem weird, but I think that programming can actually [i]contribute[/i] to depression. I had a minor episode the other day and it was quite surprising to me. I think one reason for that is that being social is a large element of being happy. I think the best programmers are those who are so internally happy without external stimulation, that they can continue to hone their craft and not fall into the pit of depression. I also think that programming attracts people who are depressed and don't want to do the hard things that they know they have to do in life. Just take a minute or a day and sit in silence with yourself and you will know what is important in your life. Do that. [/quote] Interesting post, but I don't agree with the last two sentences. After many hours and many days of silence with myself didn't help at all, it made things worse for me. For me, the start of "healing" was not to pay attention to my random thoughts, not to try to think things over, not to think about my life, etc. But the main problem with this whole thing here, these threads about depression, and the "advices", that we are not the same. What works for me, won't work for others. I have OCD, so having random thoughts all the time is an essential thing to my problem. Others have other bases. So fighting with depression should start with looking for an expert. [/quote] I also don't quite agree with the above of just sitting in silence, but that's just my case. I am well aware that depression is something that is different in literally every case. It wasn't quite my plan to have a depression discussion (Now that I think about it I don't really know what I was asking) but there really isn't anything wrong with seeking advice from others when you're already taking the steps necessary for professional help as long as you are safe and smart about it. Even just talking about it can help sometimes. Also -- Thank you BMO! The website you referred me to seems like something I would enjoy. I will look into it further.
  6. [quote name='hupsilardee' timestamp='1354936412' post='5008343'] I had no reason on paper to be depressed - well off background, parents in a happy marriage, yes I fought with my siblings but who doesn't at that age? Brainy as anybody I ever knew, and got the results to prove it. (When the depression started affecting me, my work slipped quite badly [/quote] The line I quoted is probably one of the biggest reasons I'm so bent out of shape. I hate the fact I have no outside reason to be depressed. I will guarantee you I have a fear of failure. It may not be the entire story, as I'm sure my mental habits are not perfect, but it's definitely a very large part. I'm surprised you picked that out from just my writing! I've passed the point where menial every day tasks are straining. I can go about my day and I'm even looking for a part-time job to get my feet wet. However I can say with confidence I am still depressed. I can definitely relate to your destructive or self-secluding episodes. I will leave the house when my parents get home and walk around town for hours until they go to bed and I can be 'alone' in a sense. And of course they occasionally involve beating the shit out of miscellaneous objects. I'm not exactly sure what I can ask you...but given that you're the closest thing I've found to what I'm going through any advice or relevant information would be appreciated.
  7. I guess I was going to just try and continue with what I knew I was going to do before and ignore the depression...maybe I should change up my game plan. I mean it's not like I'm completely ignoring it. I do have medication and therapy, but I'm not exactly doing anything to deal with it aggressively and get my life back, and maybe I should. Thanks for the responses, didn't really intend for it to be about depression but I'm glad it ended up that way.
  8. Now, this may sound a little odd, but I have a unique situation (See next section) and some ideas might be able to help me out. Is there any reason to casually teach yourself programming other than for enjoyment? Self-teaching is not my strong suit. I thrive on seeing something done and having a completely structured plan of how I am going to learn it and when I am going to learn it. I have a feeling I may pick up bad practices or go routes that, when I eventually attend college, will either not help or hurt my progress. Unique problem: Dealing with depression. I don't really enjoy much these days. I once enjoyed programming and I am convinced it, or at least something related to computers, is what I want to do if I can ever deal with my problem. I guess what I'm looking for is a reason to not just say screw it until I go to college. But honestly, it might be the best choice. Thoughts?
  9. Oh! Ok, I get how to say what it's doing to myself now. Thanks, I'm aware the code is poor, it's from the exercise portion of the end of the chapter. It's trying to teach me what not to do. Also, how do I format the C++ code so it shows up exactly as I type it? If i recall it's something like [code lang=c++] but I'm not 100%...Thanks!
  10. EDIT: sorry, I don't know how to paste C++ code so it formats itself, I don't type everything left justified like it shows up. Hello, I'll try to explain this as best I can. I'm having trouble understanding what this code is...saying...It's just an example exercise from a book, but I'm not sure how to 'say' to myself what this code is doing. Specifically the lines that are commented. [code] #include <iostream> #include <conio.h> using namespace std; class CAT { public: CAT(int age) {itsAge = age;} ~CAT() {} int GetAge() const {return itsAge;} private: int itsAge; }; CAT &MakeCat(int age); //What is this 'saying'? int main() { int age = 7; CAT Boots = MakeCat(age); cout << "Boots is " << Boots.GetAge() << " years old." << endl; _getch(); return 0; } CAT &MakeCat(int age) { CAT *pCat = new CAT(age); return *pCat; } //also, the code compiles but the book says there is an error //probably a memory leak situation. Don't worry about it. [/code] I understand it's saying it returns a CAT object, but is it saying it's a reference function or something, what does a reference function mean? I hope you can understand what I'm trying to ask. Thank you.
  11. A little bit, I think. I was also doing some reading from various other sources. Basically I want a class whenever I want to wrap something that python doesn't already have built in that would otherwise be very complex in a nice little package with clear instructions for working with and editing. Does that sound reasonably close? I think I still need more practice with them for sure since this is my first time being introduced to them, but I prefer to understand why I need something before 'diving in'
  12. My book that I'm self teaching from doesn't do the best job from the start of explaining what exactly classes are for and in what situations I would need to create my own class. So far the book has taught me the syntax by creating a Point class and a Television class. However, I'm just not grasping the why's and when's of creating my own class. I understand making a class that isn't supported in python by default...but what kinds of classes like that are necessary? can someone give some more examples and explain when/why you would need to implement them? I know it's a little vague, if you need more information of what I'm trying to convey here please let me know. Thank you!
  13. I'm not sure if the title is 100% accurate but I'll try to describe what I'm having troubles with as well as I can. I want a second function to be able to recognize the variables defined in function1...here's some code to help show what I mean. I think what I'm looking for is called inheritance but using google I wasn't able to word properly what I was searching for. [code] def function1(word,number): print word print number def function2(): print word*2 print number*2 function1('Word',0) function2() ##How do I make a call to function2 that automatically uses the previous variables word and number? [/code]
  14. First off, I've taken a first year college course for computer programming which focused on teaching the fundamentals through the python language. I was able to do all the assignments well enough, and I even feel as though I have an upper edge on some when it came to problem solving and programming in general in class. However, I feel very daunted by the computer science major as a whole. I have no idea what life is like in the shoes of a software developer or how hard the major/career actually is. The real problem I'm facing is lately I've been insanely afraid of the career choice as a software developer because every time I look at anything, be it a video game, websites, etc, I feel completely overwhelmed by how much coding and effort has to go into all of it, and frankly, I'm not sure I have what it takes as I page through my books re-doing last years assignments (of which so far I've only been unable to complete one) What I want to know is; what the daily life of anyone who has a major in computer science consists of, what the workload is, and how much pressure they are under to perform to the best of their ability? Majorly, what happens when you aren't able to figure something out or complete a segment of code? What kind of problems do you have to tackle on a daily basis? etc. (Would a job shadow be highly recommended?) Even if I'm completely overwhelmed at the moment, I really enjoy computers and the idea that with the proper training I could create anything I wanted. Would anyone completely recommend this career choice? Has anyone else felt this way and everything ended up turning out just fine? Thanks in advance!
  15. Hello, I'm just curious (as my commenting skills are horrid) how someone with some experience would comment some code. For example code I'll just throw up my most recent text book assignment for computing the nth prime number. Any help would be appreciated for good commenting! [source lang="python"][font="arial, sans-serif"][size="2"] def nth_prime(n): prime_list = [2] #Skip 1 and 2 by entering what is already known; 1 is not prime, 2 is prime. number = 3 #Starting point is 3 while len(prime_list) < (n): count = 0 for i in range(2,number): if number % i == 0: #if number is divisible by i, increment count. count = count + 1 if count == 0: #if number was not divisible by any i, number is prime, add number to prime_list and increment number prime_list.append(number) number = number + 1 else: #if number was divisible by any i, number is not prime, increment number number = number + 1 print prime_list[-1] #print out last prime of prime_list [/source] [/size][/font]