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Aluthreney

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  1. Thanks for the responses. I've decided to keep it simple and implement the player character as a simple class.
  2. I am implementing the player character of my game as a class, and I only need one instance. I want the code to reflect this "single instance" requirement by allowing only one instance to be made. I'm currently looking into the Singleton pattern; it seems to satisfy my requirements of only one instance, as well as limiting access to the player character data, given the scope in which I would instantiate the class. With that said, there seems to be a substantial debate over the use of the Singleton pattern. So, my question: Is it appropriate to use the Singleton pattern to implement my player character class (of which I only need one instance)? If not, are there any alternatives which meet my requirement for a single instance and limited access to the player character data?
  3. That's exactly what I needed, thank you very much. Just one more question: Could you point me to a source of information that discusses the formula you posted? I don't mean to bother, but I always like to have a conceptual understanding of the things I work with.   Once again, thank you very much.
  4. I am sorry if I was unclear; I was trying to get to the point quickly. I am trying to create an user interface where, in order to pick a color, the user must click within the area of a circle. Absolute red (255) lies at 90º; Absolute green at 210º; Absolute blue 330º. When the user clicks within the circle's area, the distance between the clicked point and each absolute color node is calculated. Finally, in order to obtain the each color's intensity, I calculate the distances with the circle's diameter.   I am having trouble with that last part (calculating the color's intensity).
  5. For a few days now, I have been trying to find a way in which I can calculate the intensity of each component of an RGB color based on two lengths. To exemplify: Let us say I am trying to measure the Red component of a color. The minimum length is 0 (which represents 255); the maximum length is 10 (which represents 0); the length I wish to measure is 10.   In so far, I have attempted to use the inverse proportion formula, but apparently it does not work well with zeros: 5/10 = 127.5/x (=) 10/5 = 127.5/x <- Inverse (=) x = 5 * 127.5/10 (=) x = 637.5/10 (=) x = 63.75 The, logically, correct answer is 0. I have been looking for an alternative, but so far I have found nothing. I would be very thankful if someone could point out a formula I could use to calculate the color intensity.
  6. @TheComet - Thank you very much for your answers; I really appreciate your participation.   More responses are still welcome!
  7.     I have been given the task of writing a short research paper on the field of work that I want to go into. My research paper also has to include an interview(s) with an individual(s) in the field I am researching, and so I decided to post some relevant questions here. This inquiry is for video game programmers who have had experience in working for a large company or as an indie developer. The answers you write down will be included in the research paper. If you are comfortable in doing so, please include your real name. If you are not comfortable sharing your real name, I will use your username on gamedev.net to associate your answers with you. You can reply to this post, or send me a PM(private message).     ~Thank you.   1. How many years have you worked in game development? 2. What is/was a typical day at your job, pertaining to your work as a programmer? 3. What was expected of you as a programmer? 4. Were there any skills and/or tasks that were required of you that might not usually be expected from a programmer? If so, what were they? 5. What advice would you give to someone who is working towards getting into this field? 6. What challenges were most difficult of overcome while working on a project as a programmer?   - Aluthreney
  8. Quick question: I'm learning python with the intention of playing around with pygame in the near future. I understand that python can be used in website development, but can I build a game with python (along side pygame) and place it on a website in a similar fashion to flash games?
  9. I really appreciate the advice and I will keep it in mind for future reference, but this was not originally meant to be a plot for a video game. What I wrote in the OP was just something that I had thought up and felt like sharing with everyone here. I admit that posting it in a creative writing section of a game development forum wasn't the clearest way to get my point across, but such is are the unbeknownst inner workings of my mind, and my actions have clearly brought me excellent rewards. In any case, I gladly welcome all criticism and advice.   If it's not too much trouble, could you point out what those grammatical errors are? You don't have to be explicitly specific if it's too much of a bother.   - Aluthren(ey)(ite)
  10. Journal Entry #1 - The Nightmare. Every night for the past few nights I've had a most terrifying of dreams. I find myself at the bottom of a well made of cobblestone. Somewhere within the murky water, in the midst of my confusion and fear, my hand reaches out and latches on to one of the stones. I'm surprised and intrigued by this new found stability, but mostly surprised. I begin to cling on to more rocks and before I'm aware of it, I'm climbing the rough wall. As I reach and surpass the dark water I see the surface. A night sky filled with stars captures my attention and motivates me to climb further. As I come, ever closer, to the edge of the well, I begin to notice the water rising after me. I panic and attempt to escape, but the foul liquid catches up to me and weighs me down. I call upon my last shreds of strength to pull me out, but as freedom is one stone way I falter and fall back into the depths of my curse. Journal Entry #2 - The search for an answer. The nightmare never ends. I've already gone to the doctor, but all he's done is give me drugs that dull my mind; my nightmare is still there. Then I went to the library with the vain hope of finding some information on whatever is plaguing me, but most of my discoveries aren't worth mentioning. The only thing that stood out as I rummaged through the book collection was a passage that talked about concentrating upon the details of the dream. By paying attention to details, it said, you are then likely to understand the meaning behind the dream. I will try this tonight. Journal Entry #3 - The Figure. I just woke up. It's been three days since my last entry and the nightmare had seemed to had finally ceased, but tonight I was back in the well. Just as I had promised myself, I ignored my primitive desire for escape and instead focused on my surroundings. The first thing that I realised was the fact that I was conscious as I dreamed. Seemingly obvious, yes, but I hadn't become aware of this fact before and that alone is fascinating. Most of the dream passed by uneventfully as I studied and spied on every detail that my eyes touched. It was only the moment before I woke up that I noticed a figure looking down at me from the top of the well. It seems my emotions got the better of me and I was forced to wake. I try to recall it now, but the figure was merely a shadow hidden by the night. I return to my sleep now without a shred of an idea as to what might occur next.   I'm not sure what the above text is yet or if it's even for a game, but I felt like sharing this with everyone. What do you think of it so far? Is there anything I can improve on? Or perhaps you have some suggestions regarding the story?   - Aluthren(ey)(ite)
  11. I'm working on recreating the renowned Game of Life simulation and I'm currently having some problems with my math. To get to the point, I'm trying to calculate the column and row of a specific element within the array knowing only the size of the array as well as the last element of the array. Let me explain by listing the information:   Index e - element in the array x - column where e is situated y - row where e is situated X - Size of the array (columns) Y - Size of the array (rows)   e = (y*X)+x <--- equation for finding an element knowing the column and row. x = e-(y*X)  <--- equation for finding the column of an element knowing the element and the row. y = (e*x)/X  <--- equation for finding the row of an element knowing the element and the column.   The array I'm working with is 8x6.   So I'm trying to find an algebraic expression that will allow me to find the column of element 9 knowing only the dimetions of the array and that the last element is 47.   P.S. If you have an answer I'd prefer if you'd point me in the right direction instead of saying it directly because I want to figure this out in order to understand it better.
  12. out of operators priority, it should be F=G((M*m)/d^2) Newton theory is good for a capiptal absolute moment in universe, and fits well linear space, but count time in, and you will need super small timestep to update linear vectors as often as possible (still a theory, some believe in a linear time quantum). Einstein theory fits time better, yet newton is sufficient usualy with resolution of 0.1 second! But forget simulating two base balls of sun mass one meter from eachother. You cannot express such a small number to step in time to have them not on oposite side of universe, they will accelerate towards eachother toooooooo much, like speed of light * speed of light. Funny   Since my plan is to produce a simulation, could you give me some pointers as to where I should look for further information on what you just explained.   P.S. I'm usually not a nitpicker, but, for future reference, try to be more careful with the way you structure your sentences because I had a hard time understanding what you were trying to say. Having said that, I don't know if english is your first language and I apologize if I offend you with this; it is not my intention.
  13. Thanks for the help everyone :D
  14. *gasp* You're right! Thank you. Aside from that, does everything else look ok?
  15. I'm trying to figure out how to properly calculate the gravitational force between two celestial objects:   Example   Mass01 = 5.97e24 (kg) Mass02 = 1.99e30 (kg)   Distance = 1.50e11 (m)   Gconst = 6.67e-11   So the formula for calculating gravitational force is: F=G(M*m/d^2) This is how I calculated:   Note: Red represents the calculation I did on that step. F=6.67e-11(5.97e24*1.99e30/1.50e11) (=) F=6.67e-11(11.88e54/1.50e11) (=) F=6.67e-11(7.92e43)   (=) F=5.283e33 (rounded)   Did I calculate this improperly or am I being paranoid?